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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2010 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
More than two years after Orange County's top lawman was indicted on corruption charges, voters will finally decide who should run the state's second-largest sheriff's department. After Michael S. Carona's arrest and resignation, county supervisors deliberately reached outside the department to name a successor. Sandra Hutchens, who had spent decades with the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, was embraced as an "agent of change," a fresh face to lead a department that had endured years of upheaval.
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NATIONAL
January 9, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A sheriff who made $212,000 in the last three years by feeding inmates what a judge said were skimpy meals was released from jail after submitting a plan to feed them better. Morgan County Sheriff Greg Bartlett profited legally from a Depression-era state law that allows sheriffs to keep any money they can make by feeding inmates for less than what they receive in state funding. U.S. District Judge U.W. Clemon had Bartlett arrested Wednesday.
NEWS
May 15, 1987
The Los Angeles Board of Pension Commissioners voted 4 to 1 to approve a hearing examiner's recommendation to discontinue the disability pension of a former Los Angeles police officer who is the sheriff of Josephine County (Grants Pass), Oregon. The former policeman, William E. Arnado, 44, took office last January while drawing his $1,700-a-month disability pension for back problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1985 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
There's hardly a publication in Los Angeles that hasn't by now featured a story on the Los Angeles Theatre Center, and with it, a shot of Bill Bushnell in the forefront of the lobby posed in a somewhat bristling, combative stance (one magazine repeated the adjective "dogged"). The shots are never just those of an ethereal or official-looking artistic director posed in front of a big building; Bushnell looks more like the modern version of a boom-town sheriff.
NATIONAL
February 8, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Barely a month ago, Christopher Pengra became mayor of a bedroom community outside Salt Lake City, anticipating the usual headaches of a fast-growing area, such humdrum fare as traffic congestion and zoning disputes. But there was nothing in his newcomer's manual to handle this: A Utah County sheriff's deputy was killed late last month, gunned down on a lonely rural highway in Eagle Mountain after stopping to assist a stranded motorist. Sgt. Cory Wride, 44, a father of five whom friends knew as a "shy cowboy," had served the town for two decades.
NATIONAL
April 3, 2009 | Scott Kraft
When the Starr County sheriff was led away in handcuffs for accepting bribes from a bail bondsman back in 1998, the county pinned his star on his chief deputy, Reymundo "Rey" Guerra. It wasn't long before Guerra was restoring the shine to the badge. Unlike his predecessor, Guerra was affable and approachable, a beefy man with a gray-flecked mustache who rarely carried a gun. He and his wife were regulars at the peach-brick Catholic church in tiny Rio Grande City.
OPINION
October 1, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Sheriff Lee Baca, his spokesman says, wouldn't have been so enthusiastic about the nutritional supplements he was pitching if he'd known the promotional video would be seen by the public. That backward mea culpa is just as poorly thought out as the Los Angeles County sheriff's unseemly use of his public office to promote a company's product. As reported by ABC7, Baca participated in a 31/2-minute video for a dietary supplement company called Yor Health, which is based in Irvine.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1998 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When deputies in the Antelope Valley were confronted earlier this month by an armed man who continued resisting after being shot with "beanbag" rounds, they did an unusual thing for law enforcement officers--they just went away. The man eventually returned home, without harming himself or anyone else. The peaceful conclusion of the incident in the high desert town of Valyermo was a result of a new law-enforcement policy that grew out of a startling 1997 study by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.
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