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Sherley Anne Williams

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987 | From Pat Hilton
After 20 years as a movie producer, Irwin Winkler, 57, is making his directorial debut. According to UA, who will distribute, the project is "Dessa Rose," based on last year's first novel by Sherley Anne Williams about interracial sisterhood, jealousy and conflict during the Civil War. The principal characters: a female plantation owner who helps runaway slaves and a pregnant slave accused of leading a revolt.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1999 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a life that began without prospects in the hot, dusty cotton fields and orchards of Fresno, and blossomed into one of limitless possibilities. Sherley Anne Williams, the daughter of African American migrant workers who became a leading poet, author and scholar at UC San Diego, has died of cancer at 54. Her life was one of extremes.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1999 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a life that began without prospects in the hot, dusty cotton fields and orchards of Fresno, and blossomed into one of limitless possibilities. Sherley Anne Williams, the daughter of African American migrant workers who became a leading poet, author and scholar at UC San Diego, has died of cancer at 54. Her life was one of extremes.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1987 | From Pat Hilton
After 20 years as a movie producer, Irwin Winkler, 57, is making his directorial debut. According to UA, who will distribute, the project is "Dessa Rose," based on last year's first novel by Sherley Anne Williams about interracial sisterhood, jealousy and conflict during the Civil War. The principal characters: a female plantation owner who helps runaway slaves and a pregnant slave accused of leading a revolt.
MAGAZINE
December 7, 1986 | MONA GABLE, Mona Gable is a Los Angeles writer.
It is a balmy evening, and Sherley Anne Williams' home in suburban San Diego is buzzing. Her son, Malcolm--a tall, handsome teen-ager in an Aloha shirt and matching shorts--keeps appearing from upstairs to see what's up with dinner. Her 10-year-old niece, Evangeline, is in the kitchen cooking hamburgers. And the telephone is ringing constantly.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1988
- Joseph A. Wapner, the "TV judge" who resides over the popular syndicated show "People's Court," will speak at the Voices for Children benefit at the San Diego Bar Assn.'s fourth annual Author's Luncheon Thursday at the Sheraton Grand Hotel. Wapner, a real-life judge before putting on the makeup and going for the really big lawyerly bucks under the TV lights, will discuss his book, "View From the Bench," an accumulation of experiences and stories during 20 years on the bench.
MAGAZINE
January 11, 1987
I was saddened and angered by Sherley Anne Williams' comments ("Understanding the Impossible," by Mona Gable, Dec. 7) about her experience at the University of Alabama in Birmingham five years ago, when she gave a poetry reading. I was saddened because I thought, "Well, racism is alive and well at UAB." As I continued to read, I became angered because racism is alive and well in every state, including California and its universities. Come on, Ms. Williams, were you really fair to single out the University of Alabama in Birmingham as an example of one of your "wounds"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1999
Books recommended for young readers by Ilene Abramson, senior librarian for the children's literature department, Los Angeles Public Library: Some of these stories are fun to tell as we celebrate Labor Day, but also on this list are serious books outlining the grave working conditions of child laborers.
NEWS
August 8, 1986 | ELAINE KENDALL
Dessa Rose by Sherley Anne Williams (Morrow: $15.95) In her short preface to "Dessa Rose," Sherley Anne Williams says, "I now know that slavery has eliminated neither heroism nor love." Building on that premise, she has fashioned an uncommonly absorbing novel by juxtaposing a pair of separate but complementary historical events.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 24, 1992 | CATHY CURTIS
I didn't get to see Alfonzo Moret's "House of Veils" installation at the Afro-American Museum in Los Angeles last winter, but those in the know remarked on the adroitness with which words and images associated with either black or white culture (notably, references to Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel "Uncle Tom's Cabin") were chosen to raise provocative questions.
MAGAZINE
December 7, 1986 | MONA GABLE, Mona Gable is a Los Angeles writer.
It is a balmy evening, and Sherley Anne Williams' home in suburban San Diego is buzzing. Her son, Malcolm--a tall, handsome teen-ager in an Aloha shirt and matching shorts--keeps appearing from upstairs to see what's up with dinner. Her 10-year-old niece, Evangeline, is in the kitchen cooking hamburgers. And the telephone is ringing constantly.
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | MARYLOUISE OATES
There were lasers, klieg lights, balloons and ice-packed tables loaded with oysters and clams. There was Joan Rivers. And there was the HOLLYWOOD sign temporarily altered to read FOXYWOOD. All together, this was one vast night of Hollywood hype, as Fox Broadcasting Co. celebrated the launch of it's prime-time programming. Fox Chairman and CEO Barry Diller wandered through the crowd that packed the still-under-construction Fox Towers' penthouse in Century City early Wednesday evening.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1990 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Most of all, novelist Sherley Anne Williams remembers Charles W. Thomas for his voice. Deep and mellifluous, full of resonance and conviction, it always made an impression, she said. She used to tell him, "If I had a voice like that, I would rule the world." He would always reply, "I have no interest in ruling the world, only in healing it." So it was with irony and "extreme sadness," Williams said, that Thomas' death came early Saturday.
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