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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2011
The Sherlockian A Novel Graham Moore Twelve: 354 pp., $24.99
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
The greatest detective in the world has, for more than a century, been under the protection of Arthur Conan Doyle and that author's heirs. But one scholar believes it's time for Sherlock Holmes to be set free. Long a fixture of the popular imagination, the time may have come for him to belong to the public as well. Author and attorney Leslie S. Klinger, widely regarded as one of the foremost authorities on Sherlock Holmes, has filed suit in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of Illinois against the Conan Doyle estate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2011 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's far too easy to stereotype an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle's storied and much-beloved detective. After all, the pipe-smoking deductive genius, since his birth in the pages of Strand magazine in 1887, has inspired many admirers to emulate his speech patterns and style of dress. Attend the annual meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and the demographic will likely skew toward those with more gray than any other color in their hair. Doing so, however, neglects some facts that surprise at first and seem obvious in hindsight: Sherlockians start on their journey toward admiration of the detective and his sidekick, Watson, at an early age, and much of the best literature that reimagines Holmes in new adventures has been written by authors still in their 20s. They have the energy and enthusiasm to go where countless writers have gone before and, in that state of freshness, stretch Conan Doyle's original world well beyond initial constraints without sacrificing the essence of what makes Holmes and Watson tick.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For those in preemptive mourning for Fox's Sherlock Holmes-inspired "House,"which comes to an end later this month, a bit of comfort: Season 2 of "Sherlock,"the BBC's flirty but still faithful contemporary rendition of the unforgettable detective, begins on PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery" Sunday night. As reimagined by British TV maestro Steven Moffat ("Doctor Who," "Jekyll") and Mark Gatiss ("Doctor Who"), this Sherlock, played with aquamarine and alabaster radiance by Benedict Cumberbatch, is a London consulting detective as brilliant, icy and occasionally preening as the original.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2013 | By Jenny Hendrix
The greatest detective in the world has, for more than a century, been under the protection of Arthur Conan Doyle and that author's heirs. But one scholar believes it's time for Sherlock Holmes to be set free. Long a fixture of the popular imagination, the time may have come for him to belong to the public as well. Author and attorney Leslie S. Klinger, widely regarded as one of the foremost authorities on Sherlock Holmes, has filed suit in the U.S. District Court in the Northern District of Illinois against the Conan Doyle estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2012 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
For those in preemptive mourning for Fox's Sherlock Holmes-inspired "House,"which comes to an end later this month, a bit of comfort: Season 2 of "Sherlock,"the BBC's flirty but still faithful contemporary rendition of the unforgettable detective, begins on PBS' "Masterpiece Mystery" Sunday night. As reimagined by British TV maestro Steven Moffat ("Doctor Who," "Jekyll") and Mark Gatiss ("Doctor Who"), this Sherlock, played with aquamarine and alabaster radiance by Benedict Cumberbatch, is a London consulting detective as brilliant, icy and occasionally preening as the original.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Death Cloud A Novel Andrew Lane Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 320 pp., $16.99 It is extremely unusual for a literary character to remain popular for more than a century. But Sherlock Holmes is no ordinary character. Ever since the eccentric, pipe-smoking detective first appeared on the page in 1887, the tweedy London logician has been revered and emulated, the subject of 200-plus films and television shows and dozens of literary spinoffs. So it's only natural that Arthur Conan Doyle fans may be curious about what may have shaped the detective in his youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
Can it be possible: a Sherlock Holmes who's quite literally "Without a Clue"? That's the sturdy and amusing premise of this bubbling British comedy (citywide), which casts Holmes as the dolt, rather than his loyal friend Dr. Watson. As writers Gary Murphy and Larry Strawther and director Thom Eberhardt would have it--with end title apologies to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle--Dr.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | JACK SMITH
My uncertainty over what I would do if I found $6 million in an abandoned car trunk has provoked some criticism from readers. The consensus is that a man is either honest or he isn't, and that in doubting my honesty in the circumstances above I am merely proving that, deep down, I am a thief. However, in saying that I would have to think about what to do with $6 million in found money, I had in mind the case of two car rental employees who found $5 million in cash and $1.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's far too easy to stereotype an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle's storied and much-beloved detective. After all, the pipe-smoking deductive genius, since his birth in the pages of Strand magazine in 1887, has inspired many admirers to emulate his speech patterns and style of dress. Attend the annual meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and the demographic will likely skew toward those with more gray than any other color in their hair. Doing so, however, neglects some facts that surprise at first, and seem obvious in hindsight: Sherlockians start on their journey toward admiration of the detective and his sidekick Watson at an early age, and much of the best literature that reimagines Holmes in new adventures has been written by authors still in their 20s. They have the energy and enthusiasm to go where countless writers have gone before, and in that state of freshness, stretch Conan Doyle's original world well beyond initial constraints without sacrificing the essence of what makes Holmes and Watson tick.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2011 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
Death Cloud A Novel Andrew Lane Farrar, Straus & Giroux: 320 pp., $16.99 It is extremely unusual for a literary character to remain popular for more than a century. But Sherlock Holmes is no ordinary character. Ever since the eccentric, pipe-smoking detective first appeared on the page in 1887, the tweedy London logician has been revered and emulated, the subject of 200-plus films and television shows and dozens of literary spinoffs. So it's only natural that Arthur Conan Doyle fans may be curious about what may have shaped the detective in his youth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2011
The Sherlockian A Novel Graham Moore Twelve: 354 pp., $24.99
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2011 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's far too easy to stereotype an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle's storied and much-beloved detective. After all, the pipe-smoking deductive genius, since his birth in the pages of Strand magazine in 1887, has inspired many admirers to emulate his speech patterns and style of dress. Attend the annual meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and the demographic will likely skew toward those with more gray than any other color in their hair. Doing so, however, neglects some facts that surprise at first and seem obvious in hindsight: Sherlockians start on their journey toward admiration of the detective and his sidekick, Watson, at an early age, and much of the best literature that reimagines Holmes in new adventures has been written by authors still in their 20s. They have the energy and enthusiasm to go where countless writers have gone before and, in that state of freshness, stretch Conan Doyle's original world well beyond initial constraints without sacrificing the essence of what makes Holmes and Watson tick.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2010 | By Sarah Weinman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's far too easy to stereotype an avid fan of Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle's storied and much-beloved detective. After all, the pipe-smoking deductive genius, since his birth in the pages of Strand magazine in 1887, has inspired many admirers to emulate his speech patterns and style of dress. Attend the annual meeting of the Baker Street Irregulars and the demographic will likely skew toward those with more gray than any other color in their hair. Doing so, however, neglects some facts that surprise at first, and seem obvious in hindsight: Sherlockians start on their journey toward admiration of the detective and his sidekick Watson at an early age, and much of the best literature that reimagines Holmes in new adventures has been written by authors still in their 20s. They have the energy and enthusiasm to go where countless writers have gone before, and in that state of freshness, stretch Conan Doyle's original world well beyond initial constraints without sacrificing the essence of what makes Holmes and Watson tick.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS
Can it be possible: a Sherlock Holmes who's quite literally "Without a Clue"? That's the sturdy and amusing premise of this bubbling British comedy (citywide), which casts Holmes as the dolt, rather than his loyal friend Dr. Watson. As writers Gary Murphy and Larry Strawther and director Thom Eberhardt would have it--with end title apologies to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle--Dr.
NEWS
April 16, 1987 | JACK SMITH
My uncertainty over what I would do if I found $6 million in an abandoned car trunk has provoked some criticism from readers. The consensus is that a man is either honest or he isn't, and that in doubting my honesty in the circumstances above I am merely proving that, deep down, I am a thief. However, in saying that I would have to think about what to do with $6 million in found money, I had in mind the case of two car rental employees who found $5 million in cash and $1.
MAGAZINE
February 1, 2004 | SONDRA FARRELL BAZROD
Call it the Case of Sherlock Homes--tract homes, that is. The facts are elementary, yet devilishly singular. Living on an otherwise unremarkable cul-de-sac in the San Fernando Valley city of North Hills is one Chuck Kovacic, a communications specialist with a penchant for dressing as Sherlock Holmes.
NEWS
March 12, 1987 | TIM WATERS, Times Staff Writer
The place was a South Bay hotel, the time was six years ago, and the occasion was a 100th anniversary celebration of the first time Sherlock Holmes met Dr. John Watson. The topic of the real-life panel of crime experts: the sleuthing techniques of the master detective. Everything was fine until a man in the audience posed a question to the panel. Standing before an audience of 200 or so, he had the gall to call Holmes a fictional character.
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