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NEWS
March 17, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic sign of the mounting costs of the drought, the state has agreed to pay a group of farmers who lost one of the world's most productive agricultural lands to harmful salts, a byproduct of heavy water exportation from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The payment, said to be $3.6 million by a source close to the negotiations, includes compensation for crop losses and for leaving fields fallow in the future on Sherman Island, a once-fertile isle at the westernmost end of the delta.
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NEWS
March 17, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic sign of the mounting costs of the drought, the state has agreed to pay a group of farmers who lost one of the world's most productive agricultural lands to harmful salts, a byproduct of heavy water exportation from the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. The payment, said to be $3.6 million by a source close to the negotiations, includes compensation for crop losses and for leaving fields fallow in the future on Sherman Island, a once-fertile isle at the westernmost end of the delta.
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NEWS
March 3, 1987
Police in Vallejo said they may have clues to the killer of 6-year-old Jeremy Stoner, whose naked body was found last week among reeds beside a road on Sherman Island in the Sacramento River Delta. "We're making headway," said Vallejo Police Lt. Al Lehman. He said a bulletin for authorities only had been issued with a description of a possible suspect and a vehicle spotted in the area where Jeremy was last seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2005 | Diane Haithman
In 1892, amateur photographer Augustus F. Sherman entered public service as a registry clerk with the Immigration Division at Ellis Island, where an average of 5,000 immigrants streamed through each day during the peak periods of arrival (1905-07). During these years, Sherman used the access provided by his position to create more than 200 photographic portraits of individuals, families and groups who were detained either for medical reasons or further interrogation.
SPORTS
May 18, 1994 | PETE THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the dog is the natural enemy of the cat, the snake of man, so were we of the fish patrol the natural enemies of the fishermen. --JACK LONDON, "Tales of the Fish Patrol" From the looks on the faces of the four men, confronted on a recent night by Department of Fish and Game wardens and caught red-handed with dozens of undersized striped bass, it seems little has changed since Jack London's days as a commissioned warden around the turn of the century.
OPINION
August 22, 2005 | Luis Alberto Urrea, Journalist and novelist LUIS ALBERTO URREA's latest book is a novel, "The Hummingbird's Daughter" (Little, Brown, 2005).
I have before me two haunting books of photography that I believe every American family should own. And these two hint at a third volume that does not exist. It doesn't, but it should. Our history is incomplete without it. But first, let's look at the two we do have. The first is "Agustus F. Sherman: Ellis Island Portraits 1905-1920." If your children ever ask you what this country is made of, or who we Americans are, you should show them this amazing book.
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