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Sherman Oaks Antique Mall

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
With glittering eye, Valerie Kurokawa roams the Sherman Oaks Antique Mall, in search of reamers. You and I may have a vague notion that reamers, or juicers, are those venerable kitchen thingies on which the housewives of yesteryear twisted half an orange or grapefruit in order to produce a bit of home-squeezed juice.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1998 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN
With glittering eye, Valerie Kurokawa roams the Sherman Oaks Antique Mall, in search of reamers. You and I may have a vague notion that reamers, or juicers, are those venerable kitchen thingies on which the housewives of yesteryear twisted half an orange or grapefruit in order to produce a bit of home-squeezed juice.
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MAGAZINE
January 27, 1991 | MICHAEL EISENHOWER
Southern Californians are in love with cowboy boots; we take them to all the best places, unapologetically wearing them with everything from Armani suits to black Lycra bicycle shorts. These days, there's no boot like an old boot. The trick is, it has to be someone else's old boots--vintage and used boots are so hot that stores carrying them (look on Melrose Avenue, Santa Monica's Main Street and in the Sherman Oaks Antique Mall) can barely keep up with demand.
BUSINESS
May 14, 1989 | SAM BURCHELL
NOW VIRTUALLY a classical style, Art Deco reached its height between 1925 and 1935. Like art nouveau before it, Art Deco was an attempt to create a universal idiom, applicable to interior design, architecture and the decorative arts in general. Its nature can be seen with particular clarity in the striking jewelry of the day. The roots of Art Deco lie in many different areas: in the work of architects such as Charles Rennie Mackintosh, Frank Lloyd Wright and Adolf Loos; in the bold costumes and exotic colors of the Ballets Russes of 1909; in the artifacts of Tutankhamen's tomb, opened beginning in 1922; in the discovery and popularity of African and pre-Columbian art; in the streamlined industrial design of the time, and in the bold geometry of Cubism.
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | Researched by APRIL JACKSON, CAROLINE LEMKE, JULIE SHEER and STEPHANIE STASSEL / Los Angeles Times
The earthquake centered in the San Fernando Valley's Northridge caused death and destruction across Southern California. In addition to disrupting local freeways, the quake collapsed buildings and is being blamed for at least 31 deaths. A survey of the damage: FREEWAY COLLAPSE 1) Golden State Freeway (I-5): Northbound lanes closed from Roxford Street in Sylmar to Lyons Avenue; collapsed bridge.
NEWS
January 18, 1994 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the Valley to Hollywood to Downtown, the looting began almost as soon as the ground stopped shaking. Looters stole purses in Downtown Los Angeles. They grabbed coffee mugs and T-shirts at the Wax Museum on Hollywood Boulevard. Down the street, they stole a 10-inch wooden spear and a stuffed badger at a hunting and taxidermy shop. Los Angeles Police Department officers made more than 25 arrests and responded to many other looting reports citywide.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2008 | Pauline OConnor
Originally part of El Camino Real (the trail between Spanish missions), Ventura Boulevard is the oldest route in the San Fernando Valley. Starting in Universal City and winding through Studio City, Sherman Oaks, Encino, Tarzana and Woodland Hills, the boulevard is home to restaurants, boutiques, car washes and supermarkets. Its traffic jams are notorious, but, on the bright side, there's a lot of visual stimuli.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You see them at swap meets and garage sales, antiques shows and flea markets. They have magnifying glasses in their pockets (the better to look for flaws and identifying marks, my dear) and a gleam in their eyes. They are not simply buyers. They are collectors, people whose notion of the good, the true and the beautiful extends to some very odd stuff indeed.
HOME & GARDEN
January 3, 2009 | Barbara Thornburg
With their restored 1918 loft and their 1946 Chevy pickup, the thrift-shop chairs they sit on and the vintage clothes they wear, fashion designer Elizabeth Kramer and real estate agent Robert Heller celebrate giving old things new life. Entering the couple's Vignes Street loft in downtown L.A., you feel as if you have wandered into a prop house filled with treasures from a bygone era. The 3,000-square-foot open-plan space, with its low-slung arches and concrete floor, was once a bakery.
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