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Sherman Oaks Landmarks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a two-year struggle to preserve the architectural integrity of a sleek local landmark, the last Los Angeles Unified school in the San Fernando Valley without air conditioning will finally get some relief--in another nine months. Kester Avenue Elementary School was designed by modernist architect Richard Neutra.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a two-year struggle to preserve the architectural integrity of a Sherman Oaks landmark, the last Los Angeles Unified school in the San Fernando Valley without air conditioning will finally get relief by next summer. Kester Avenue Elementary School was designed 50 years ago by architect Richard Neutra, and was copied by schools around the world. Neutra created a school with single-story buildings and long, covered walkways under wood-paneled ceilings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a two-year struggle to preserve the architectural integrity of a Sherman Oaks landmark, the last Los Angeles Unified school in the San Fernando Valley without air conditioning will finally get relief by next summer. Kester Avenue Elementary School was designed 50 years ago by architect Richard Neutra, and was copied by schools around the world. Neutra created a school with single-story buildings and long, covered walkways under wood-paneled ceilings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2000 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a two-year struggle to preserve the architectural integrity of a sleek local landmark, the last Los Angeles Unified school in the San Fernando Valley without air conditioning will finally get some relief--in another nine months. Kester Avenue Elementary School was designed by modernist architect Richard Neutra.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1988 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Daniel Van Meter's Sherman Oaks back yard is unusual, to say the least. Behind half a dozen junked cars, an old bus, washing machines, water heaters, an old outhouse and even a turret from a battleship stands Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument No. 184--The Tower of Wooden Pallets. Constructed by Van Meter in 1951, the 22-foot-tall tower consists of about 2,000 wooden pallets that were tossed out by a brewery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1988 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
A handful of Sherman Oaks residents urged Los Angeles Board of Public Works commissioners Monday to deny a neighbor's request to cut down a large cedar tree growing in a city-owned parkway. The residents said the 60-foot-tall tree is a landmark at the intersection of Valley Vista Boulevard and Stansbury Avenue. They submitted photographs of the tree and a petition with 20 signatures, asking that the tree be spared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 1990 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A developer whose proposed Ventura Boulevard project would replace the Scene of the Crime bookstore and other Sherman Oaks landmarks has filed suit against the city, charging he has been denied a demolition permit for political reasons. In a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Los Angeles Superior Court, Ventura Woodman Plaza Ltd. claimed a permit has been improperly withheld since last year because of neighborhood opposition and the intervention of Councilman Michael Woo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1988 | STEPHANIE CHAVEZ, Times Staff Writer
A handful of Sherman Oaks residents urged Los Angeles Board of Public Works commissioners Monday to deny a neighbor's request to cut down a large cedar tree growing in a city-owned parkway. The residents said the 60-foot-tall tree is a landmark at the intersection of Valley Vista Boulevard and Stansbury Avenue. They submitted photographs of the tree and a petition with 20 signatures, asking that the tree be spared.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1988 | RICHARD SIMON, Times Staff Writer
Daniel Van Meter's Sherman Oaks back yard is unusual, to say the least. Behind half a dozen junked cars, an old bus, washing machines, water heaters, an old outhouse and even a turret from a battleship stands Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument No. 184--The Tower of Wooden Pallets. Constructed by Van Meter in 1951, the 22-foot-tall tower consists of about 2,000 wooden pallets that were tossed out by a brewery.
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