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April 25, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Just go home, climbers. The adventure of scaling Mt. Everest is not as important as the concerns of the Sherpa guides who lost 13 of their own - three more are missing and presumed dead - in an avalanche. The guides are saying that they do not want to assist in any more climbs this year. They are mourning those who died, and they are fearful of conditions on the mountain. Many climbers already are showing respect for the Sherpas' situation, packing up for the year. But a few have indicated that they still plan to climb.
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NEWS
April 25, 2014 | By Karin Klein
Just go home, climbers. The adventure of scaling Mt. Everest is not as important as the concerns of the Sherpa guides who lost 13 of their own - three more are missing and presumed dead - in an avalanche. The guides are saying that they do not want to assist in any more climbs this year. They are mourning those who died, and they are fearful of conditions on the mountain. Many climbers already are showing respect for the Sherpas' situation, packing up for the year. But a few have indicated that they still plan to climb.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Left for dead near the summit of Mt. Everest, Australian adventurer Lincoln Hall survived the night alone, without supplies, in temperatures well below zero. And then he got lucky. As dawn broke, one of the last teams of climbers to ascend the mountain in 2006 encountered Hall sitting cross-legged near a ledge with a precipitous drop. His first words were, "I imagine you are surprised to see me here. " The team abandoned its own summit attempt to rescue Hall, whose wife and two sons had already been told he was dead.
WORLD
April 20, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - Bill Burke, a 72-year-old mountaineer from Costa Mesa, was making his latest attempt to scale Mt. Everest's northern face when the news came of the deadliest avalanche ever on the world's highest peak. As many as 16 Nepalese mountain guides, all ethnic Sherpas, were killed Friday on the south side of the mountain, but Everest's fraternity of climbers and their guides is small. The father of Burke's Nepalese guide was among the dead; another Sherpa in his group lost two relatives, including a nephew.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1987 | PATRICK MOTT, Special to The Times and Patrick Mott is an Orange County free - lance writer who wrote this report based on a telephone interview with the climbers in Katmandu
A team of Southern California mountaineers has returned safely to Katmandu, Nepal, after becoming the first U.S. climbing team to put a man on the summit of the 24,682-foot Annapurna IV--one of the most difficult climbs in the Himalayas--and the first team of any kind to ascend the mountain's northwest ridge. "It was the hardest thing I've ever done in my life," said Tim Schinhofen, 34, an AT&T communications executive from El Toro who, with Sherpa guide Pemba Norbu, 34, reached the summit Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1987 | MARK I. PINSKY, Times Staff Writer
An El Toro man has become the first American to scale the 24,682-foot Mt. Anapurna IV in the Himalayas, drawing cheers from family and friends who have been anxiously awaiting news back in Orange County. A statement released by the Ministry of Tourism of Nepal said Tim Schinhofen, 34, accompanied by a Sherpa guide, Pemba Norbu, 34, reached the peak Saturday after an 8 1/2-hour climb up the steep northwest ridge from the last of three base camps at 22,800 feet.
NEWS
May 1, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
A flamboyant Texan eager to return home to the United States in time for a reunion with 1950 classmates at Yale University has become the oldest man to climb Mt. Everest. Richard Bass, a 55-year-old Dallas oil millionaire, reached the top of the world's highest mountain shortly after noon Tuesday. The climb also made him the first person to reach the highest points on the world's seven continents.
NEWS
October 1, 1998 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost everyone knows the first person to conquer Mt. Everest was the New Zealander Edmund Hillary. Not many know that the second person, Tenzing Norgay, a Sherpa guide from Nepal, reached the summit only seconds later. Hillary was knighted by the queen of England and became a household name around the world for the 1953 feat. Norgay, considered the world's most experienced climber at the time, is a postscript.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | United Press International
A Sherpa guide leading a South Korean team's bid to scale the difficult southwest face of Mt. Everest fell to an icy death when his rope snapped, the Ministry of Tourism said today. Tshutten Dorje Sherpa, 21, died Jan. 30 while he was ferrying loads between the team's third and fourth camps, the ministry said. It said the guide's body could not be recovered on the face of the 29,028-foot mountain, the world's highest peak.
NEWS
May 22, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
A Sherpa guide reached the top of Mt. Everest in less than 16 hours, shattering the record for the fastest climb of the world's highest peak, the Nepalese Tourism Ministry said in Katmandu, the capital. Babu Chhiri, 34, made the climb to the 29,035-foot summit a year after he set a duration record by camping 21 hours on the peak. His brother Dawa had scaled the mountain earlier and waited at the summit to welcome him, said Chhiri's business partner, who contacted the climbers by radio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2012 | Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Left for dead near the summit of Mt. Everest, Australian adventurer Lincoln Hall survived the night alone, without supplies, in temperatures well below zero. And then he got lucky. As dawn broke, one of the last teams of climbers to ascend the mountain in 2006 encountered Hall sitting cross-legged near a ledge with a precipitous drop. His first words were, "I imagine you are surprised to see me here. " The team abandoned its own summit attempt to rescue Hall, whose wife and two sons had already been told he was dead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2011
Poly Styrene Singer in the punk band X-Ray Spex Poly Styrene, 53, the braces-wearing singer who belted out "Oh bondage, up yours!" with the punk band X-Ray Spex, died Monday, according to a statement on her website . Styrene, whose real name was Marion Elliott-Said, was in hospice care in St. Leonards-on-Sea, England, after having been diagnosed with cancer. X-Ray Spex released just one album, 1978's "Germ Free Adolescents. " But its aggressively catchy single "Oh Bondage, Up Yours!"
NATIONAL
November 28, 2010 | By David Kelly
The kitchen was hopping, orders flying in from every direction, and Jangbu Sherpa was smack in the middle, deep-frying samosas while eyeballing a simmering yak stew. Waiters rushed in ? more momos, more thupka, more papadums! Sherpa stayed cool, never breaking a sweat. And why would he? He's reached the summit of Mount Everest 10 times, seen men swept off high peaks, and survived an avalanche on K-2, the world's most dangerous mountain. "When I stood on Everest," he said, glancing up from a pot of boiling oil, "I felt like I was standing on top of the sky. " These days he stands over a hot oven at Sherpa's Adventurers Restaurant & Bar in downtown Boulder, serving up Nepali and Tibetan fare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Mingma Norbu Sherpa, 50, managing director of the World Wildlife Fund in the eastern Himalayas, died Sept. 23 in a helicopter crash in Nepal. He had been a resident of Falls Church, Va., but spent most of each year in the eastern Himalaya region. The accident occurred near the India border, about a mile from Ghunsa village, according to the World Wildlife Fund website. Seven officials with the fund were among those on board. A search team found no survivors.
NEWS
September 15, 2002 | GEORGE JAHN, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
Nepal's Sherpas helped conquer Everest, but Hans Gapp remains convinced that the world's best mountaineers have something to learn at Austria's lower altitudes from alpinists like himself. How to tie a knot, for instance. "First you go over," Gapp says as his Nepalese students sit beneath a 7,218-foot sheer cliff in the Austrian Alps watching as he guides a rope into a pattern. "Then, you go under and you go through, making a figure eight -- a very important knot."
WORLD
May 17, 2002 | From Associated Press
It got crowded in the so-called Death Zone on Mt. Everest on Thursday, as a record 54 people stood atop the world's highest peak--including a grandson of one of the first two men to conquer it in 1953. The son of the other was headed for the summit on a slower route. Basking in rare, fine weather was Tashi Wangchuk Tenzing, whose Sherpa grandfather, Tenzing Norgay, made history when he and New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary made it to the summit 49 years ago.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | ELLIOTT ALMOND, Times Staff Writer
The Sherpas, the inhabitants of the high Himalayan valleys, call Mt. Everest Cholmolunga, Mother Goddess of the World. Lying in a geological rampart that makes passage between Tibet and Nepal improbable, the 29,028-foot Everest is the embodiment of mountaineering. There may be more vertical pieces of rock, but few are more challenging. So the world's best climbers make annual pilgrimages to Nepal and Tibet to pay their respects to this mighty mountain and attempt to conquer it.
NEWS
September 8, 2001 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maybe it's the exalted beauty of the mountains or the golden glow of the sunsets, maybe oxygen deprivation. Maybe it's the twinkling eyes of the rugged men who work as guides in the Himalayas. Or maybe it's the way trekking in Nepal, a little country perched between China and India, makes Western women yearn for transformation of both body and soul.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2001 | From Associated Press
Babu Chhiri, a Sherpa guide who made the fastest trip up Mt. Everest and stayed at the top the longest without using bottled oxygen, has died on the world's highest peak. The 35-year-old Chhiri was guiding a team of mountaineers Sunday when he slipped and fell 100 feet into a crevasse at Camp 2, at 20,400 feet.
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