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Sherrie Levine

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March 16, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As art's relationship to society has changed throughout this century, artists have modeled their activities on all sorts of disciplines, fantasies and even animals. Minimalism gave us the artist as an industrial laborer. Pop presented the artist as a refined consumer of common commodities. And California Assemblage proposed that the artist is a pack rat, who furtively digs through culture's junk in search of castoff gems.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Sharon Mizota
Lew Thomas' first U.S. solo exhibition in almost 20 years focuses on work from the 1970s, creating a kind of bridge between the early days of Conceptual art and the 1980s “Pictures” generation. In this sense, the content and style of the show at Cherry and Martin is familiar; more surprising is the way Thomas' deadpan sense of humor comes through. “34 Avenue Between Geary and Clement” from 1972 is a series of photographs of every building on a San Francisco block. It's urban density's answer to Ed Ruscha's 1966 “Every Building on the Sunset Strip.” Elsewhere, Thomas' work aligns with that of artists like Sherrie Levine and Louise Lawler, who shifted art's focus to the context surrounding the work.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
'I intend that my work contaminate history," says artist Sherrie Levine, who accomplishes exactly that by borrowing any bit of history that strikes her fancy for use in her own work. A key and controversial figure in the post-Conceptualist Appropriationist school that coalesced in the '80s, the New York-based artist makes works that seem at a glance to be nothing more than blatant knockoffs of Modernist masterpieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
A critical mass of artists emerging in the '70s whose work responded to image saturation in the media and everyday life -- among them Cindy Sherman, Sherrie Levine and Richard Prince -- came to be known as the Pictures Generation. It could be argued that, thanks to the kudzu-like claims of the World Wide Web, every generation of artists since then, by default if not by conscious embrace, has been a pictures generation. The designation is a natural fit for Matt Lipps, whose show, "Library," at Marc Selwyn, addresses head-on the centrality of photographic imagery to our collective history and memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Leah Ollman
A critical mass of artists emerging in the '70s whose work responded to image saturation in the media and everyday life -- among them Cindy Sherman, Sherrie Levine and Richard Prince -- came to be known as the Pictures Generation. It could be argued that, thanks to the kudzu-like claims of the World Wide Web, every generation of artists since then, by default if not by conscious embrace, has been a pictures generation. The designation is a natural fit for Matt Lipps, whose show, "Library," at Marc Selwyn, addresses head-on the centrality of photographic imagery to our collective history and memory.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
A common expectation for works of art is that they inject vibrancy and life into inert material. Amy Adler's art goes the other way, however, and that turns out to be not necessarily a bad thing. In a somewhat mixed Focus Series exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, the bloodless morbidity of her best photographs is positively unnerving. The show includes 11 works (some feature groups of between three and eight photographs), most made in 1996 and 1997 by the 32-year-old L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1986 | COLIN GARDNER
Sherrie Levine attracted critical attention in 1981 as a hard-line appropriator, rephotographing nudes by Edward Weston to create works that were indistinguishable from the originals. It was this very questioning, and by extension denial, of originality that aligned Levine firmly with much recent theory that challenges not only the rhetoric of representation, but also the innate validity of the artwork in an image-saturated economy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Leah Ollman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Frances Stark's right arm is as good a place as any to begin to consider what drives the artist and writer. She sports two tattoos there, one an ornate foliate pattern based on a Louis Sullivan drawing, inked near her shoulder when she was in college, during the "five minutes" she aspired to be an architecture critic. The other, on her inner arm just above the elbow, reads "Me Edith," in simple cursive. Edith was her grandmother, an avid amateur photographer. "There's a sepia-tone print of her in a bathing suit looking really cute," Stark explained.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 2014 | By Sharon Mizota
Lew Thomas' first U.S. solo exhibition in almost 20 years focuses on work from the 1970s, creating a kind of bridge between the early days of Conceptual art and the 1980s “Pictures” generation. In this sense, the content and style of the show at Cherry and Martin is familiar; more surprising is the way Thomas' deadpan sense of humor comes through. “34 Avenue Between Geary and Clement” from 1972 is a series of photographs of every building on a San Francisco block. It's urban density's answer to Ed Ruscha's 1966 “Every Building on the Sunset Strip.” Elsewhere, Thomas' work aligns with that of artists like Sherrie Levine and Louise Lawler, who shifted art's focus to the context surrounding the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1994 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Christopher Grimes Gallery, Lisa Yuskavage is showing paintings of doe-eyed females who are less pulchritudinous than pathetic. Here are Vargas girls minus the sex appeal, Barbies minus the soignee proportions, post-adolescent Kewpie dolls minus the pedophiliac charm. Like Hostess Twinkies, these girl-creatures consecrate themselves to the task of seduction, yet are only able to master repulsion. They are obscenely sweet, absurdly bloated and leave a distinctly chemical aftertaste.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 2010 | By Leah Ollman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Frances Stark's right arm is as good a place as any to begin to consider what drives the artist and writer. She sports two tattoos there, one an ornate foliate pattern based on a Louis Sullivan drawing, inked near her shoulder when she was in college, during the "five minutes" she aspired to be an architecture critic. The other, on her inner arm just above the elbow, reads "Me Edith," in simple cursive. Edith was her grandmother, an avid amateur photographer. "There's a sepia-tone print of her in a bathing suit looking really cute," Stark explained.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2001 | HOLLY MYERS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Truly embracing Joost van Oss and Sherrie Levine's recent collaborative work--the product of their yearlong residency in the Getty Research Institute's scholar program--requires a leap of faith. The five silvery aluminum sculptures on display in the institute's gallery are replicas of three tables and two chairs designed in the early 1900s by De Stijl architect Gerrit Rietveld.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1998 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
A common expectation for works of art is that they inject vibrancy and life into inert material. Amy Adler's art goes the other way, however, and that turns out to be not necessarily a bad thing. In a somewhat mixed Focus Series exhibition at the Museum of Contemporary Art, the bloodless morbidity of her best photographs is positively unnerving. The show includes 11 works (some feature groups of between three and eight photographs), most made in 1996 and 1997 by the 32-year-old L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1996 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a regular contributor to Calendar
'I intend that my work contaminate history," says artist Sherrie Levine, who accomplishes exactly that by borrowing any bit of history that strikes her fancy for use in her own work. A key and controversial figure in the post-Conceptualist Appropriationist school that coalesced in the '80s, the New York-based artist makes works that seem at a glance to be nothing more than blatant knockoffs of Modernist masterpieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 1995 | DAVID PAGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As art's relationship to society has changed throughout this century, artists have modeled their activities on all sorts of disciplines, fantasies and even animals. Minimalism gave us the artist as an industrial laborer. Pop presented the artist as a refined consumer of common commodities. And California Assemblage proposed that the artist is a pack rat, who furtively digs through culture's junk in search of castoff gems.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1994 | SUSAN KANDEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At Christopher Grimes Gallery, Lisa Yuskavage is showing paintings of doe-eyed females who are less pulchritudinous than pathetic. Here are Vargas girls minus the sex appeal, Barbies minus the soignee proportions, post-adolescent Kewpie dolls minus the pedophiliac charm. Like Hostess Twinkies, these girl-creatures consecrate themselves to the task of seduction, yet are only able to master repulsion. They are obscenely sweet, absurdly bloated and leave a distinctly chemical aftertaste.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1987 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"Oh no, not another appropriationist, simulationist image-stealer," groans a weary seeker of the new, suddenly confronted with faithful copies of Pop era masterworks. "What a bore, but I might as well find out which member of the rerun tribe has put so much energy into duplicating Jasper Johns' collage and encaustic flags, Roy Lichtenstein's comic-book paintings and Claes Oldenburg's plaster food and clothing. Could be Sherrie Levine or Mike Bidlo.
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