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Sherrie Rabinowitz

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
"Probably the most powerful magic that contemporary humankind has is the ability to pick up an instrument and talk to somebody on the other side of the planet," said Kit Galloway in the Electronic Cafe's Santa Monica headquarters. "What we're stressing is that a telecommunications revolution isn't something you consume. It's something you do."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
"Probably the most powerful magic that contemporary humankind has is the ability to pick up an instrument and talk to somebody on the other side of the planet," said Kit Galloway in the Electronic Cafe's Santa Monica headquarters. "What we're stressing is that a telecommunications revolution isn't something you consume. It's something you do."
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MAGAZINE
November 6, 1994 | Malaika Brown
The reading is already 10 minutes behind schedule and Merilene M. Murphy is racing to get the connections right. When at last she gets the modem and "videophone" configured, the call that she--and everyone else in her Telepoetics Salon Hollywood--has been waiting for arrives. It's poet Heather Haley in Vancouver and another confluence of verse and video is about to begin. Doug Knott does the first reading and seconds after he begins, the videophone captures a frozen moment from his reading.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1996 | PAUL KARON
There is no separating artists Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz from the technology they use to make that art. Two of the original cyber-beatniks, the Santa Monica-based media and telecollaboration artists are well-known in online circles as the founders of the Electronic Cafe, a worldwide network of telecommunications- and computer-enhanced gathering spots and performance venues.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1994 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Filmforum's monumental "Scratching the Belly of the Beast: Cutting Edge Media in Los Angeles, 1992-94" presents "L.A. Video: Scratching the Surface," at Hollywood Moguls (1650 N. Hudson Ave.), tonight at 8 p.m. and on Wednesday at 8 p.m., "Fitful Flashes," a program by filmmakers who have been showcased by Filmforum over the years. Both programs are daunting and range widely from the self-indulgent and murky to the challenging and captivating.
NEWS
May 1, 1994 | THOMAS FIELDS-MEYER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Kit Galloway says artists are afraid of technology. Computers, microprocessors, satellite linkups, videophones--they tend to scare away folks who are more at ease with, say, watercolors, or dance floors, or a pad and pen. "There's a lot of fear out there," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1987 | DON SNOWDEN
Kit Galloway and Sherrie Rabinowitz of Mobile Image don't think along the small scale lines of producing video art tapes. Their ultimate objectives are sweeping: to foster cross-cultural collaborations through a global network of telecommunications systems. The prototype for such goals was "Electronic Cafe," the pair's six-week project installed during the 1984 Olympic Games and companion Arts Festival here. Galloway and Rabinowitz linked "Mom and Pop" restaurants in Koreatown, East L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1989 | JULIE WHEELOCK
When film maker Gary Meyer takes a break from his work at the Empowerment Project, a small Santa Monica film and video studio, he frequently steps next door to catch a performance at Highways Performance Space, the 130-seat performance art gallery. The directors of Highways, in turn, confer with neighbor Steve Durland, editor of High Performance magazine, about the graphic design for their press releases and newsletters.
NEWS
November 26, 1986 | CONNIE ZWEIG, Zweig lives in Los Angeles. and
We must learn to create on the same scale as we can destroy. --High-tech artist Kit Galloway It's a frenetic morning at the offices of International Synergy Institute on Melrose Avenue. The cool elegance of the setting betrays the intensity beneath. Simple steel-gray sofas. A two-foot gold Buddha lit from behind by sunlight. An IBM PC glowing incandescently.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Rachel Rosenthal thought she had found a home in Los Angeles when she settled here more than 30 years ago. Over time, she became an internationally renowned performance artist--of sufficient stature to be one of three locally based artists selected for the Los Angeles Festival last year. With media reports regularly trumpeting the arrival of Los Angeles as a world-class art center, Rosenthal figured to be sitting pretty, sifting through offers to present fresh pieces in her hometown.
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