Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSherrill Milnes
IN THE NEWS

Sherrill Milnes

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
If Sherrill Milnes had thrown out the rule book Saturday at El Camino College--the recital rule book, that is--he would have led with his strengths: a personable manner best illustrated in the group of American songs that closed the evening. It was here, in the irony-tinged fire and brimstone of Malotte's "David and Goliath," that Milnes' dramatic mastery came across compellingly. The 55-year-old baritone was the preacher at the pulpit.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1996 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Baritone Sherrill Milnes brought a truly oddball, potentially cloying program to Carpenter Center for the Performing Arts in Long Beach Saturday night and put it over with unerring taste, genuine fervor and solid technical accomplishment. On this occasion, the veteran singer, 61, showed little evidence of his much publicized vocal troubles of recent years. There were some steely tones and the occasional waver, but the overwhelming impression was of a fluent, hefty and persuasive voice.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Returning to Ambassador Auditorium after a five-year absence--his last two local recitals having been at UCLA--Sherrill Milnes pleased a large crowd of voice-fanciers in a generous and varied recital program Sunday night. Assisted by his longtime, and model musical partner, pianist Jon Spong, Milnes again created an atmosphere of cordial, personable and detailed music-making. And he was in strong voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1993 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
While the ads herald him as "the world's most popular operatic baritone" Sherrill Milnes doesn't really need such hype. Especially when he can still sing with the power and luster and impact in evidence during his recital, Saturday night at Ambassador Auditorium. In any case, his performance bore little in common with the one he gave three years ago at the South Bay Center for the Arts--save for a similar program of Italian antiquities, German Lieder and assorted 20th-Century tonal music.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1993 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
While the ads herald him as "the world's most popular operatic baritone" Sherrill Milnes doesn't really need such hype. Especially when he can still sing with the power and luster and impact in evidence during his recital, Saturday night at Ambassador Auditorium. In any case, his performance bore little in common with the one he gave three years ago at the South Bay Center for the Arts--save for a similar program of Italian antiquities, German Lieder and assorted 20th-Century tonal music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Informed opera lovers approached Royce Hall, UCLA, with some trepidation Saturday night. Sherrill Milnes was giving a recital. Normally, that would be cause for happy anticipation. Milnes is the latest--and, perhaps, the last--in a line of great American baritones. That lofty line began with Lawrence Tibbett and John Charles Thomas in the 1920s, and continued rapturously with Leonard Warren, Robert Weede and Robert Merrill.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The premiere of a work by James Hopkins of USC and a performance of Mendelssohn's "Elijah" with Metropolitan Opera baritone Sherrill Milnes in the title role will highlight the Pacific Chorale's three-concert, 1992-93 season, which was announced Monday. Hopkins' "How Beautiful It Is" was commissioned by the Orange County Philharmonic Society to commemorate the season--the chorale's 25th--and will premiere on April 25, 1993. "Elijah" will open the season Nov. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993
Readers responded with sincerity, wit and, occasionally, vehemence to our queries for their assessments of the best and worst in pop music, theater, art, classical music and dance in Orange County in 1992. Here is some of what they had to say: This year's highlight was the Pacific Chorale's performance of "Elijah." The clear singing and powerful performances by the chorale and Sherrill Milnes (brought) the most enthusiastic audience response either of us has seen in our five years of attending concerts at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1996 | TIMOTHY MANGAN
Baritone Sherrill Milnes brought a truly oddball, potentially cloying program to Carpenter Center for the Performing Arts in Long Beach Saturday night and put it over with unerring taste, genuine fervor and solid technical accomplishment. On this occasion, the veteran singer, 61, showed little evidence of his much publicized vocal troubles of recent years. There were some steely tones and the occasional waver, but the overwhelming impression was of a fluent, hefty and persuasive voice.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers music for The Times Orange County Edition.
It wasn't so long ago that Mendelssohn's oratorio "Elijah" was No. 2, right up there behind Handel's "Messiah" in popularity and frequency of performances. But things changed. Maybe it was overexposure through too many amateur presentations, or perhaps it was a sea change in musical tastes. At any rate, "Elijah" has pretty much left the boards, at least temporarily.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993
Readers responded with sincerity, wit and, occasionally, vehemence to our queries for their assessments of the best and worst in pop music, theater, art, classical music and dance in Orange County in 1992. Here is some of what they had to say: This year's highlight was the Pacific Chorale's performance of "Elijah." The clear singing and powerful performances by the chorale and Sherrill Milnes (brought) the most enthusiastic audience response either of us has seen in our five years of attending concerts at the Orange County Performing Arts Center.
NEWS
October 29, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, Chris Pasles covers music for The Times Orange County Edition.
It wasn't so long ago that Mendelssohn's oratorio "Elijah" was No. 2, right up there behind Handel's "Messiah" in popularity and frequency of performances. But things changed. Maybe it was overexposure through too many amateur presentations, or perhaps it was a sea change in musical tastes. At any rate, "Elijah" has pretty much left the boards, at least temporarily.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1992 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The premiere of a work by James Hopkins of USC and a performance of Mendelssohn's "Elijah" with Metropolitan Opera baritone Sherrill Milnes in the title role will highlight the Pacific Chorale's three-concert, 1992-93 season, which was announced Monday. Hopkins' "How Beautiful It Is" was commissioned by the Orange County Philharmonic Society to commemorate the season--the chorale's 25th--and will premiere on April 25, 1993. "Elijah" will open the season Nov. 1.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 1, 1990 | DONNA PERLMUTTER
If Sherrill Milnes had thrown out the rule book Saturday at El Camino College--the recital rule book, that is--he would have led with his strengths: a personable manner best illustrated in the group of American songs that closed the evening. It was here, in the irony-tinged fire and brimstone of Malotte's "David and Goliath," that Milnes' dramatic mastery came across compellingly. The 55-year-old baritone was the preacher at the pulpit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Returning to Ambassador Auditorium after a five-year absence--his last two local recitals having been at UCLA--Sherrill Milnes pleased a large crowd of voice-fanciers in a generous and varied recital program Sunday night. Assisted by his longtime, and model musical partner, pianist Jon Spong, Milnes again created an atmosphere of cordial, personable and detailed music-making. And he was in strong voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1987 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, Times Music Critic
Informed opera lovers approached Royce Hall, UCLA, with some trepidation Saturday night. Sherrill Milnes was giving a recital. Normally, that would be cause for happy anticipation. Milnes is the latest--and, perhaps, the last--in a line of great American baritones. That lofty line began with Lawrence Tibbett and John Charles Thomas in the 1920s, and continued rapturously with Leonard Warren, Robert Weede and Robert Merrill.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1989 | DAVID CROOK, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Tenor Luciano Pavarotti will lead a group of stars in performing with the New York City Opera orchestra in a benefit for Lincoln Center. Also appearing at next Monday's gala will be Mariella Devia, Kallen Esperian, Shirley Verrett, Pietro Ballo, Thomas Hampson, Sherrill Milnes and Ruggero Raimondi. The artists will perform arias, duets and ensembles with the orchestra.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|