Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSherry Rowlands
IN THE NEWS

Sherry Rowlands

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former presidential advisor Dick Morris will be asked to provide evidence on the procurement of hundreds of confidential FBI files on former Republican officeholders, the chairman of the congressional committee investigating the matter said Friday. Rep. William F. Clinger Jr. (R-Pa.) said he would ask Morris to testify about a new tabloid report that Morris had claimed First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton ordered the files delivered to the White House early in the Clinton presidency.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The world's largest natural products convention, a celebration of all things healthy and eco-friendly, was being held at the Anaheim Convention Center Saturday when F. Sherwood Rowland, 84, died at his home in Corona del Mar. It's not much of a stretch to say that Rowland, 84, helped spawn the industry that drew more than 60,000 people and 2,000 exhibitors. In 1973, the UC Irvine chemistry professor and a young researcher on his team, Mario Molina, discovered that manmade chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons destroyed the Earth's fragile and vital ozone layer.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 12, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The world's largest natural products convention, a celebration of all things healthy and eco-friendly, was being held at the Anaheim Convention Center Saturday when F. Sherwood Rowland, 84, died at his home in Corona del Mar. It's not much of a stretch to say that Rowland, 84, helped spawn the industry that drew more than 60,000 people and 2,000 exhibitors. In 1973, the UC Irvine chemistry professor and a young researcher on his team, Mario Molina, discovered that manmade chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons destroyed the Earth's fragile and vital ozone layer.
NEWS
September 7, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former presidential advisor Dick Morris will be asked to provide evidence on the procurement of hundreds of confidential FBI files on former Republican officeholders, the chairman of the congressional committee investigating the matter said Friday. Rep. William F. Clinger Jr. (R-Pa.) said he would ask Morris to testify about a new tabloid report that Morris had claimed First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton ordered the files delivered to the White House early in the Clinton presidency.
NEWS
January 6, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eileen McGann, the wife of former presidential aide Dick Morris, confirmed reports that she has decided to leave him, citing ceaseless public pressure since he was accused of being a regular customer of a $200-an-hour prostitute. The scandal surfaced in August with a report about the relationship between Morris, 48, and prostitute Sherry Rowlands, who sold her story to a supermarket tabloid. Morris immediately resigned.
NEWS
August 31, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Declaring that he is in love with his wife, former Clinton political advisor Dick Morris met briefly with reporters Friday but steadfastly refused comment on the sex scandal that forced him to resign. Morris, President Clinton's top political advisor, resigned Thursday after a tabloid reported that he had a relationship with a prostitute and allowed her to eavesdrop on calls to the White House. "I do not want to dignify yellow journalism with a comment," Morris said Friday outside his home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1996 | ALEXANDER COCKBURN, Alexander Cockburn is the coauthor, with Ken Silverstein, of "Washington Babylon," from Verso
At least it proves that the Cold War is truly over. In the old days, a hooker would claim that the john had whispered government secrets into her ear or mumbled the Pentagon's nuclear attack codes in his sleep. The best that Sherry Rowlands can manage, in alleging breaches of national security, is that Dickie Morris gave her a preview of Hillary's convention speech, plus advance warning that there might be life on Mars. As scandals go, it's pretty pathetic.
OPINION
December 29, 1996 | Bruce McCall, Bruce McCall is a regular contributor to the New Yorker
You can bet the ranch on scientists not finding a cure for the common cold, the B-1 bomber project not being canceled and Chevy Chase not copping a single Oscar nomination in 1997. But none of this is exactly hot news, crystal-ball-wise. Here and now, let's rip the lid off the inside dope on the startling nonevents of the coming year.
NEWS
September 10, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dick Morris, the former presidential advisor who resigned in disgrace last month, told congressional investigators Monday he had "no personal knowledge" that First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton was linked to White House requests for FBI files. Responding to claims attributed to the diary of a prostitute with whom he had a relationship, Morris said in a sworn statement that he had discussed the FBI files matter with Sherry Rowlands, but told her in substance only that "everyone thinks it's Hillary."
NEWS
September 30, 1996 | KATHLEEN KELLEHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In "The Sex Life of the Foot & Shoe," an amorous podophile gushes: "You can cut off all the women of the world at the ankles. Give me the part from the ankles down and you can have all the rest." What is it about feet anyway? * Call girl Sherry Rowlands told the world that Dick Morris, campaign advisor to presidents, loved to suck her toes. * A San Dimas man, posing as a massage student, recently offered free foot rubs to three women and a girl, segueing into toe-sucking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1996 | Dana Parsons
A colleague was stunned that a presidential advisor might confide White House shop talk to a hooker. Candice, a 28-year-old Newport Beach woman who charges men $300 an hour for her company--was not. "They totally trust me," she said of her clientele, which she added is mostly professional men, some of whom have called her over a period of several years. When I asked how much of their personal or business lives they disclose, she said, "It depends on the person.
NEWS
September 4, 1996 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The professional hand-wringers are back. Every couple of years or so--when the mainstream media follow a story that first appeared in a supermarket tabloid like the National Enquirer or the Star--the tsk-tsking begins. In 1992, the outcry was over Gennifer Flowers' claims of an affair with Bill Clinton. After that it was the National Enquirer's scoops on the O.J. Simpson case. And now, it's the Star's expose of Clinton confidant Dick Morris' alleged kinky trysts with a $200-an-hour hooker.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|