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Sherwin B Nuland

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March 6, 1994 | ERIKA TAYLOR
HOW WE DIE: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter by Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D. (Alfred A. Knopf: $24; 269 pp.) "(Cancer's) first cells are the bastard offspring of unsuspecting parents . . . ," says Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D. in his newest book, "How We Die." "In the community of living tissues, the uncontrolled mob of misfits that is cancer behaves like a gang of perpetually wilding adolescents. They are the juvenile delinquents of cellular society."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Sherwin B. Nuland, physician and author of the book "How We Die," died Monday at his home in Hamden, Conn., at age 83. He had been afflicted with prostate cancer, his daughter Amelia Nuland said. An unsentimental and bracing look at death, "How We Die" won the National Book Award for nonfiction in 1994. It sought to counter the idea of death with dignity, instead looking frankly at the systemic challenges and physical depredations of the dying. The book has sold more than 500,000 copies worldwide.
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NEWS
November 17, 1994 | Associated Press
A meditation on death, "How We Die: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter," by Sherwin B. Nuland, won the nonfiction prize at the National Book Awards Wednesday night. William Gaddis won his second fiction award for "A Frolic of His Own," and James Tate won the poetry award for the "Worshipful Company of Fletchers." Each winner received $10,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
"My father's power and the weakness that nurtured it have accompanied me all the days of my life," reflects Sherwin Nuland in the foreword to his poignant and heartfelt memoir, "Lost in America." Now in his 70s, a clinical professor of surgery at the Yale School of Medicine, Nuland is the author of several critically acclaimed books on medical subjects, including one that won the 1994 National Book Award: "How We Die: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter."
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | PAUL D. COLFORD, Paul D. Colford is a columnist for Newsday.
When Sherwin B. Nuland set aside his surgical practice and teaching chores to write a book, friends asked what exactly was keeping him from the fray. "I would tell them what my book was about--and that would end the conversation," Nuland recalls. Many others have been far less squeamish. Nuland's "How We Die" (Knopf), a graphic but sage reflection on the ways people die from heart attacks, cancer and other killers, has become what would seem to be the unlikeliest bestseller of 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Sherwin B. Nuland, physician and author of the book "How We Die," died Monday at his home in Hamden, Conn., at age 83. He had been afflicted with prostate cancer, his daughter Amelia Nuland said. An unsentimental and bracing look at death, "How We Die" won the National Book Award for nonfiction in 1994. It sought to counter the idea of death with dignity, instead looking frankly at the systemic challenges and physical depredations of the dying. The book has sold more than 500,000 copies worldwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
"My father's power and the weakness that nurtured it have accompanied me all the days of my life," reflects Sherwin Nuland in the foreword to his poignant and heartfelt memoir, "Lost in America." Now in his 70s, a clinical professor of surgery at the Yale School of Medicine, Nuland is the author of several critically acclaimed books on medical subjects, including one that won the 1994 National Book Award: "How We Die: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter."
BOOKS
May 29, 1988 | Robert V. Bruce, Bruce is the author of "The Launching of American Science 1846-1876" (Alfred A. Knopf). and
Thomas Carlyle decidedly overstated the case when he claimed that "the history of the world is but the biography of great men." Still, the collective biography approach to history has shown its power to engage the general reader since Plutarch and Suetonius. More than half a century ago, Paul De Kruif's "Microbe Hunters" applied it with great popular success to the history of medicine.
BOOKS
February 13, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Weedy Louisiana: Bayous, beignets, alligators, saucy humor, spicy food, a no-man's land of race relations; and this is only the fertile background for one of the most compelling voices in fiction of the last decade. Meely is short for Emile, the 15-year-old son of an alligator hunter with a broken heart, Meely's mother having died in childbirth when he was 7. Meely's father disappears in the swamp, from which he emerges every couple of weeks or so with a woman, or better, a bag of groceries.
BOOKS
February 13, 2000 | SUSAN SALTER REYNOLDS
Weedy Louisiana: Bayous, beignets, alligators, saucy humor, spicy food, a no-man's land of race relations; and this is only the fertile background for one of the most compelling voices in fiction of the last decade. Meely is short for Emile, the 15-year-old son of an alligator hunter with a broken heart, Meely's mother having died in childbirth when he was 7. Meely's father disappears in the swamp, from which he emerges every couple of weeks or so with a woman, or better, a bag of groceries.
NEWS
November 17, 1994 | Associated Press
A meditation on death, "How We Die: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter," by Sherwin B. Nuland, won the nonfiction prize at the National Book Awards Wednesday night. William Gaddis won his second fiction award for "A Frolic of His Own," and James Tate won the poetry award for the "Worshipful Company of Fletchers." Each winner received $10,000.
NEWS
March 24, 1994 | PAUL D. COLFORD, Paul D. Colford is a columnist for Newsday.
When Sherwin B. Nuland set aside his surgical practice and teaching chores to write a book, friends asked what exactly was keeping him from the fray. "I would tell them what my book was about--and that would end the conversation," Nuland recalls. Many others have been far less squeamish. Nuland's "How We Die" (Knopf), a graphic but sage reflection on the ways people die from heart attacks, cancer and other killers, has become what would seem to be the unlikeliest bestseller of 1994.
BOOKS
March 6, 1994 | ERIKA TAYLOR
HOW WE DIE: Reflections on Life's Final Chapter by Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D. (Alfred A. Knopf: $24; 269 pp.) "(Cancer's) first cells are the bastard offspring of unsuspecting parents . . . ," says Sherwin B. Nuland, M.D. in his newest book, "How We Die." "In the community of living tissues, the uncontrolled mob of misfits that is cancer behaves like a gang of perpetually wilding adolescents. They are the juvenile delinquents of cellular society."
BOOKS
May 29, 1988 | Robert V. Bruce, Bruce is the author of "The Launching of American Science 1846-1876" (Alfred A. Knopf). and
Thomas Carlyle decidedly overstated the case when he claimed that "the history of the world is but the biography of great men." Still, the collective biography approach to history has shown its power to engage the general reader since Plutarch and Suetonius. More than half a century ago, Paul De Kruif's "Microbe Hunters" applied it with great popular success to the history of medicine.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 1989
Why is it that we consider it our "God"-given right to incarcerate, enslave, isolate, torture and kill members of other species simply because we are human and they are not, and we can benefit from these practices? ("Man vs. Dog: a Bioethical Trade-Off," by Sherwin B. Nuland, Op-Ed Page, Sept. 5). A "bioethical trade-off"? In whose opinion? What are the lab animals being "traded"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1995 | NONA YATES
The birth and death of stars, the future of the universe, stellar explosions and the origin of life are among the topics to be discussed at a symposium on "The Origin and Evolution of the Universe" Friday at UCLA. Hosted by the Center for the Study of Evolution and the Origin of Life, leading astronomers and astrophysicists will discuss details of some recent developments in cosmology. The program is suited for a general-interest audience and will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
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