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Sherwin T Chan

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August 14, 1988 | Associated Press
President Reagan plans to appoint Sherwin T. Chan of San Marino to the Civil Rights Commission, the White House announced Saturday. Chan, 65, an engineering specialist with Northrop Corp., would fill the vacancy left by the death last June of Clarence M. Pendleton.
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August 17, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK and CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Staff Writers
Asian-American leaders Tuesday welcomed President Reagan's appointment of a San Marino man to the U.S. Commission for Civil Rights, but some questioned its value as an election-year boost to Vice President George Bush in California. Sherwin T. Chan, 64, an aerospace engineer whose family fled the Chinese Communists, was selected by the White House last weekend as the first Asian-American member of the commission, a body that has turned controversial in the Reagan years.
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NEWS
August 17, 1988 | KEVIN RODERICK and CLAUDIA LUTHER, Times Staff Writers
Asian-American leaders Tuesday welcomed President Reagan's appointment of a San Marino man to the U.S. Commission for Civil Rights, but some questioned its value as an election-year boost to Vice President George Bush in California. Sherwin T. Chan, 64, an aerospace engineer whose family fled the Chinese Communists, was selected by the White House last weekend as the first Asian-American member of the commission, a body that has turned controversial in the Reagan years.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | Associated Press
President Reagan plans to appoint Sherwin T. Chan of San Marino to the Civil Rights Commission, the White House announced Saturday. Chan, 65, an engineering specialist with Northrop Corp., would fill the vacancy left by the death last June of Clarence M. Pendleton.
NEWS
October 7, 1989 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Civil Rights Commission Friday blasted its own embattled chairman for a speech on homosexuality that he is to give today in Anaheim at a conference organized by a group stridently opposed to gay rights. By a vote of 6-1, the commission adopted a statement condemning the title of chairman William B. Allen's talk--"Blacks? Animals? Homosexuals? What is a Minority?"--as "thoughtless, disgusting, and unnecessarily inflammatory."
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