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Sherwood Cryer

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NEWS
April 1, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Gilley's is a goner. Once it was the most famous of honky-tonks, a vast 70,000-square-foot beer joint on a gone-to-seed street lined with used car lots and pawnshops. John Travolta made the mechanical bulls here all the rage after he rode them in the movie "Urban Cowboy." But the nightclub--self-described as the "biggest, brawlingest, dancingest, craziest honky-tonk in Texas"--was locked shut Friday morning, the day after a court-appointed receiver ordered it closed.
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NEWS
April 1, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Gilley's is a goner. Once it was the most famous of honky-tonks, a vast 70,000-square-foot beer joint on a gone-to-seed street lined with used car lots and pawnshops. John Travolta made the mechanical bulls here all the rage after he rode them in the movie "Urban Cowboy." But the nightclub--self-described as the "biggest, brawlingest, dancingest, craziest honky-tonk in Texas"--was locked shut Friday morning, the day after a court-appointed receiver ordered it closed.
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BUSINESS
March 31, 1989 | From Times wire services
A judge ordered Gilley's nightclub, a local institution that was the primary setting for the 1980 movie "Urban Cowboy," to close its doors indefinitely. "That's it. It's over, they won. They booted us out today," Sherwood Cryer, the club's longtime owner, said late Thursday. Cryer lost a $17-million lawsuit to recording artist Mickey Gilley last summer and declared bankruptcy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Country singer Mickey Gilley filed suit in Houston Tuesday to end his ties with Gilley's, the sprawling dance spot in nearby Pasadena, Tex., that helped him gain widespread fame when it was featured in the movie "Urban Cowboy." Gilley said he has not participated in the club's operation for three years and has not associated with the club or its operator Sherwood Cryer for the last year. "My pride in the club is gone. It no longer represents Mickey Gilley the entertainer," the performer said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 1990 | FROM TIMES WIRE SERVICES
The fire that destroyed the landmark Gilley's country-western nightclub has been ruled arson, authorities said. Pasadena Fire Marshal Bill Yearout declined to reveal how or where Thursday's fire broke out. He said arson investigators have several leads and don't want to release details while the investigation continues. Gilley's had been closed since March 1989 because of a legal dispute between country-western singer Mickey Gilley and his one-time partner in the nightclub, Sherwood Cryer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The co-owner of Gilley's, the cavernous honky-tonk made famous in the movie "Urban Cowboy," has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection--one day after he was to pay a $16-million judgment to the Pasadena, Tex., club's namesake, country singer Mickey Gilley.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | From Reuters
Gilley's, the country-Western nightclub made famous in the movie "Urban Cowboy," has closed its doors, perhaps for good. A spokeswoman for singer Mickey Gilley, the club's namesake and former star attraction, said no tears are being shed. "This is something we're all happy about. Frankly, this mess has been going on a long time, and we're all rather relieved something was finally done," the spokeswoman, who asked not to be identified, said Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Bulldozers on Thursday began grinding through the twisted remains of Gilley's, the legendary honky-tonk left vacant because of a bitter legal battle and then devastated by arson. The demolition is expected to take about two weeks. Only the club's rodeo arena and recording studio will remain. Gilley's was just a popular country-western club in the oil patch until it was romanticized in the 1980 hit movie "Urban Cowboy." Much of the movie was filmed in the club.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1994 | BUDDY SEIGAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The fates sometimes work in strange, ironic ways. What curious forces conspired to propel three cousins from the small community of Ferriday, La., into the national spotlight in their respective fields? The lives and careers of Jerry Lee Lewis, Jimmy Swaggart and country singer Mickey Gilley--the latter of whom performs Monday night at the Crazy Horse Steak House in Santa Ana--read like a poorly written TV drama, but fact often is stranger than bad fiction.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1988 | HOLLY GLEASON
How much has the shine faded from the "Urban Cowboy" movement? Ask Mickey Gilley. Despite his racking up eight No. 1 country singles in the 2 years after the "Urban Cowboy" movie helped catapult Gilley to the top of the sales charts in 1980, last year CBS Records dropped his contract. But then, that's just one of several setbacks the Louisiana-born singer has had to weather lately.
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