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NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Shakespeare meets the Beatles, Robin Hood and Beatrix Potter on a guided 13-day coach tour in summer 2012 of England, Scotland and Wales. The trip begins and ends in London , host of the 2012 Olympic Summer Games, and covers cities and villages as far north as Edinburgh, Scotland, and Durham, England. Visit William Shakespeare's birthplace (Stratford on Avon, England), the Beatles' home turf (Liverpool, England), Beatrix Potter's house (Lake District) and Sherwood Forest (legendary English digs of Robin Hood)
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OPINION
March 24, 2013 | By the Los Angeles Times editorial board
Sherwood Forest is not a neighborhood of merry men and women these days. For the last several months, the leafy enclave of rambling homes in Northridge in the San Fernando Valley has been the site of a pitched battle between developers who want to build a 112-unit elder care facility and opponents who complain that the "Costco-size" institution will be an eyesore, and an unnecessary one at that, in a community zoned for single-family dwellings....
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
When you call a movie " Robin Hood," you set up expectations: a gallant archer, a maid named Marion, a band of Merry Men, a crusading king and a certain camaraderie in Sherwood Forest. The latest version has those elements, but they don't play out in a way that's easy to recognize or respond to, and that's a problem. It's an especially frustrating problem because the key creative people involved in the film are among the best in the business and their work here is for the most part solid.
NEWS
November 4, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Shakespeare meets the Beatles, Robin Hood and Beatrix Potter on a guided 13-day coach tour in summer 2012 of England, Scotland and Wales. The trip begins and ends in London , host of the 2012 Olympic Summer Games, and covers cities and villages as far north as Edinburgh, Scotland, and Durham, England. Visit William Shakespeare's birthplace (Stratford on Avon, England), the Beatles' home turf (Liverpool, England), Beatrix Potter's house (Lake District) and Sherwood Forest (legendary English digs of Robin Hood)
OPINION
March 24, 2013 | By the Los Angeles Times editorial board
Sherwood Forest is not a neighborhood of merry men and women these days. For the last several months, the leafy enclave of rambling homes in Northridge in the San Fernando Valley has been the site of a pitched battle between developers who want to build a 112-unit elder care facility and opponents who complain that the "Costco-size" institution will be an eyesore, and an unnecessary one at that, in a community zoned for single-family dwellings....
SPORTS
August 5, 1992
For a change of pace, novice archer John Helnatz of Rosamond went fishing with a bow and arrow at Black Rock on the Owens River near Independence. He shot a 9-pound 13-ounce carp. It was perfectly legal. With a few territorial restrictions, taking carp--officially, a non-gamefish--with archery gear is generally allowed in California.
NEWS
November 4, 2007 | Kate Schuman, Associated Press
Robin Hood might have a hard time hiding out in the Sherwood Forest of today. The forest once covered about 100,000 acres, a big chunk of present-day Nottinghamshire county. Today its core is about 450 acres, with patches spread out through the rest of the county. Experts say urgent action is needed to regenerate the forest and save the rare and endangered ancient oaks at its heart.
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Here in the heart of Sherwood Forest, a real-life Robin Hood tale is unfolding, only in reverse. If the British government gets its way, large chunks of these woods where the Merry Men reputedly squared off against the sheriff of Nottingham may soon be up for sale. Officials want the money to help plug a gaping hole in the public purse. To outraged locals, it's a case of taking a common good from ordinary, hardworking taxpayers and giving it to rich developers and greedy corporations.
SPORTS
December 9, 2000
Reality was temporarily suspended last weekend as 12 millionaires strolled around the mountains in Thousand Oaks trying to win another million playing golf in front of adoring fans. By the looks on the players' faces, one may think they were asked to march through Bataan instead of keeping their golf balls off the front yards of nearby celebrities. Fred Couples was the only player to crack a smile the whole weekend. Hal Sutton announced Sunday on the sixth tee in front of a crowd numbering well into the tens that he would "be glad when this is over so I can get out of here."
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | Maureen Brown, Maureen Brown is a writer and mother of four.
Having seen Robin Hood twice, and having read a plethora of reviews analyzing the film, its content and actors, I am yet left with one unanswered question. Will Maid Marian and Robin Hood set up household in Sherwood Forest or will they return to her castle abode? Consider Little John's wife, who upon having her home burned, relocates in Sherwood Forest with Little John and appears to adjust well to a simplistic life in a tree house with six children.
WORLD
January 26, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Here in the heart of Sherwood Forest, a real-life Robin Hood tale is unfolding, only in reverse. If the British government gets its way, large chunks of these woods where the Merry Men reputedly squared off against the sheriff of Nottingham may soon be up for sale. Officials want the money to help plug a gaping hole in the public purse. To outraged locals, it's a case of taking a common good from ordinary, hardworking taxpayers and giving it to rich developers and greedy corporations.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
When you call a movie " Robin Hood," you set up expectations: a gallant archer, a maid named Marion, a band of Merry Men, a crusading king and a certain camaraderie in Sherwood Forest. The latest version has those elements, but they don't play out in a way that's easy to recognize or respond to, and that's a problem. It's an especially frustrating problem because the key creative people involved in the film are among the best in the business and their work here is for the most part solid.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2010 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Whatever you say about Russell Crowe's up-with-people campaign against unresponsive, property-grabbing government in "Robin Hood," don't suggest to its makers that the historical epic is the first Tea Party movie. "No, no," says screenwriter Brian Helgeland. "That would not be good." For all of its 12th century trappings, Helgeland and director Ridley Scott's retelling of the mythical English archer tries to be thematically contemporary. Rather than a steal-from-the rich yeoman, the film's titular hero is a disillusioned war veteran just back from a distant, violent campaign against Muslims.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010
CAST: Russell Crowe, Cate Blanchett and William Hurt. Directed by Ridley Scott. BACK STORY: He steals from the rich and gives to the poor. Or does he? Scott knows that audiences have their preconceived notions of the Robin Hood legend. "It's so much a part of the original English culture and everyone knows it," the British filmmaker says. That's presented the "Gladiator" director with opportunities and obstacles as he and five-time collaborator Crowe revisit Sherwood Forest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
THERE ARE so few high-profile studio movies being made in Hollywood today that it was something of a surprise to discover last week that "Nottingham," Ridley Scott's much-anticipated Robin Hood drama, had been postponed, even with Russell Crowe on board in the role of a more likable-than-usual Sheriff of Nottingham. Universal Pictures, which is financing, cited labor uncertainty, an unfinished script and seasonal concerns about shooting during winter in forest locations that needed to have the rich green hue associated with leafy Sherwood Forest.
NEWS
November 4, 2007 | Kate Schuman, Associated Press
Robin Hood might have a hard time hiding out in the Sherwood Forest of today. The forest once covered about 100,000 acres, a big chunk of present-day Nottinghamshire county. Today its core is about 450 acres, with patches spread out through the rest of the county. Experts say urgent action is needed to regenerate the forest and save the rare and endangered ancient oaks at its heart.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2008 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
THERE ARE so few high-profile studio movies being made in Hollywood today that it was something of a surprise to discover last week that "Nottingham," Ridley Scott's much-anticipated Robin Hood drama, had been postponed, even with Russell Crowe on board in the role of a more likable-than-usual Sheriff of Nottingham. Universal Pictures, which is financing, cited labor uncertainty, an unfinished script and seasonal concerns about shooting during winter in forest locations that needed to have the rich green hue associated with leafy Sherwood Forest.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2010
CAST: Russell Crowe, Cate Blanchett and William Hurt. Directed by Ridley Scott. BACK STORY: He steals from the rich and gives to the poor. Or does he? Scott knows that audiences have their preconceived notions of the Robin Hood legend. "It's so much a part of the original English culture and everyone knows it," the British filmmaker says. That's presented the "Gladiator" director with opportunities and obstacles as he and five-time collaborator Crowe revisit Sherwood Forest.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 2007 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
Robbing from the rich and giving to the poor just isn't what it used to be, judging from the efforts of screenwriters reworking the Robin Hood legend for a new generation. In a television series, written by Dominic Minghella and airing this season on BBC America, Robin Hood is a pacifist interested in robbing only the sheriff of Nottingham. (A midseason marathon is scheduled for Sunday.
SPORTS
December 9, 2000
Reality was temporarily suspended last weekend as 12 millionaires strolled around the mountains in Thousand Oaks trying to win another million playing golf in front of adoring fans. By the looks on the players' faces, one may think they were asked to march through Bataan instead of keeping their golf balls off the front yards of nearby celebrities. Fred Couples was the only player to crack a smile the whole weekend. Hal Sutton announced Sunday on the sixth tee in front of a crowd numbering well into the tens that he would "be glad when this is over so I can get out of here."
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