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Sherwood Kiraly

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BOOKS
May 6, 1990 | SONJA BOLLE
A reader can't help but be a little apprehensive when a novel opens with too overt a reference to a literary classic. "Call me Charlie," invites the baseball-playing, good ol' boy narrator of Sherwood Kiraly's first novel, "California Rush." (All the books reviewed in this column are debut works by California writers.) But here the "Call me Ishmael" echo is a double reference: Philip Roth begins his own baseball book ("The Great American Novel") in exactly the same way: "Call me Smitty."
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The Laguna Playhouse scores points for both ambition (of a sort) and populism with "Who's Hot, Who's Not," the new comedy by Sherwood Kiraly. This is an ingratiating audience-pleaser, commissioned by the theater--that's the ambition angle--and adapted from Laguna resident Kiraly's own 1998 novel. Not the least of its virtues: It's full of verbal jokes that don't go clunk, even when the narrative itself makes threatening clunking noises.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The playwright who adapted the comic novel "Who's Hot, Who's Not" for the stage has taken huge liberties with the piece. The theme has grown weightier, the ending is completely different and one of the book's most delicious characters has been scrapped. The novelist has not called screaming to the Laguna Playhouse, where "Who's Hot" premieres Saturday after tonight's final preview. That's because he's the playwright.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The playwright who adapted the comic novel "Who's Hot, Who's Not" for the stage has taken huge liberties with the piece. The theme has grown weightier, the ending is completely different and one of the book's most delicious characters has been scrapped. The novelist has not called screaming to the Laguna Playhouse, where "Who's Hot" premieres Saturday after tonight's final preview. That's because he's the playwright.
BOOKS
October 8, 1995 | ERIKA TAYLOR
DIMINISHED CAPACITY by Sherwood Kiraly. (Berkley: $10; 256 pp.) Rollie Zerbs is 80 years old and has no real way of supporting himself. Fortunately, he owns an extremely rare baseball card worth thousands of dollars. Unfortunately, his nephew Cooper has agreed to accompany Rollie to Chicago where he can sell the card at an auction. Unfortunately, due to a head injury, Cooper is a bit forgetful himself, only, unlike Rollie, he's also a bitter, beaten man.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | By DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Beach author Sherwood Kiraly spent 16 years at a national newspaper syndicate, serving as comics editor and editor for Ann Landers, Erma Bombeck, Roger Ebert, Sylvia Porter, and Evans and Novak. But in 1988, when the ownership of the syndicate changed for the third time in a decade, he decided it was time to do something different: He would write a novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
The Laguna Playhouse scores points for both ambition (of a sort) and populism with "Who's Hot, Who's Not," the new comedy by Sherwood Kiraly. This is an ingratiating audience-pleaser, commissioned by the theater--that's the ambition angle--and adapted from Laguna resident Kiraly's own 1998 novel. Not the least of its virtues: It's full of verbal jokes that don't go clunk, even when the narrative itself makes threatening clunking noises.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 1999 | Lesley Wright, (714) 966-7824
Author Sherwood Kiraly will be at the Los Alamitos Rossmoor Library on Sunday for a talk and book signing. Kiraly, a Laguna Beach resident, is known for his humorous works that often involve a baseball theme. Some of his titles include "California Rush," "Who's Hot, Who's Not" and "Diminished Capacity," which is being made into a movie. His books may be purchased at the signing, but the talk and reception are free. The event begins at 3 p.m. at the library, 12700 Montecito Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2001
* Art. "Afterglow in the Desert: The Art of Fernand Lungren," a show of early 20th century Western landscapes organized by the University Art Museum at UC Santa Barbara, closes Sunday at the Laguna Art Museum, 307 Cliff Drive, Laguna Beach. Today through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. $4 to $5; children 12 and younger admitted free. (949) 494-8971. * Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2001
COSTA MESA 7:30pm Opera Opera Pacific unveils its new co-production (with Houston Grand Opera and Michigan Opera Theatre) of Bizet's "Carmen," directed by Ron Daniels, with sets and costumes by Riccardo Hernandez and Constance Hoffman. Irina Mishura will sing the title role today and Saturday. Angela Horn takes over Friday and Sunday. Mark Baker and Michael Hendrick will alternate as Don Jose. John DeMain will conduct.
BOOKS
October 8, 1995 | ERIKA TAYLOR
DIMINISHED CAPACITY by Sherwood Kiraly. (Berkley: $10; 256 pp.) Rollie Zerbs is 80 years old and has no real way of supporting himself. Fortunately, he owns an extremely rare baseball card worth thousands of dollars. Unfortunately, his nephew Cooper has agreed to accompany Rollie to Chicago where he can sell the card at an auction. Unfortunately, due to a head injury, Cooper is a bit forgetful himself, only, unlike Rollie, he's also a bitter, beaten man.
NEWS
July 5, 1990 | By DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Beach author Sherwood Kiraly spent 16 years at a national newspaper syndicate, serving as comics editor and editor for Ann Landers, Erma Bombeck, Roger Ebert, Sylvia Porter, and Evans and Novak. But in 1988, when the ownership of the syndicate changed for the third time in a decade, he decided it was time to do something different: He would write a novel.
BOOKS
May 6, 1990 | SONJA BOLLE
A reader can't help but be a little apprehensive when a novel opens with too overt a reference to a literary classic. "Call me Charlie," invites the baseball-playing, good ol' boy narrator of Sherwood Kiraly's first novel, "California Rush." (All the books reviewed in this column are debut works by California writers.) But here the "Call me Ishmael" echo is a double reference: Philip Roth begins his own baseball book ("The Great American Novel") in exactly the same way: "Call me Smitty."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2006 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
In an effort raise its profile as a center for the development of new plays, Laguna Playhouse has scheduled for its 2006-07 season two world premiere commissions by writers who have enjoyed long associations with the theater. On the schedule are "The Verdi Girls" by Irish playwright Bernard Farrell (Jan. 6-Feb.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2008 | Susan King
When Laguna Beach-based writer Sherwood Kiraly's second comedic novel, "Diminished Capacity," was published in 1995, MGM snapped up the rights. But Kiraly wasn't asked to write the adaptation. "That's more the L.A. style," he says. "They don't really think the novelist is going to be flexible enough to deal with a screenplay." That production never came to fruition.
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