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Sherwood L Boehlert

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NATIONAL
February 5, 2003 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
The two Republicans leading the congressional investigations into the Columbia disaster are longtime allies who are of one mind as they confront their next mission: fixing America's space program and setting its future course. Sen. John McCain of Arizona, who will chair the Senate hearing, and Rep. Sherwood L. Boehlert of New York, who will lead the House probe, believe strongly that space exploration must go on -- a view shared by political leaders of both parties, including President Bush.
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NATIONAL
February 5, 2003 | Edwin Chen, Times Staff Writer
The two Republicans leading the congressional investigations into the Columbia disaster are longtime allies who are of one mind as they confront their next mission: fixing America's space program and setting its future course. Sen. John McCain of Arizona, who will chair the Senate hearing, and Rep. Sherwood L. Boehlert of New York, who will lead the House probe, believe strongly that space exploration must go on -- a view shared by political leaders of both parties, including President Bush.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000
"Needed: A Vote for the Earth" (editorial, April 10) correctly points the finger at a small group of lawmakers holding up action on the historic conservation funding opportunity now before Congress. However, your editorial also states that the Sierra Club supports this legislation, which is not yet the case. When the bill reaches the House floor, a bipartisan group led by Reps. Sherwood L. Boehlert (R-N.Y.) and Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) will offer an amendment to remove incentives for offshore oil drilling from the bill and ensure that funding is not spent on environmentally damaging development along our fragile coasts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2000
"Needed: A Vote for the Earth" (editorial, April 10) correctly points the finger at a small group of lawmakers holding up action on the historic conservation funding opportunity now before Congress. However, your editorial also states that the Sierra Club supports this legislation, which is not yet the case. When the bill reaches the House floor, a bipartisan group led by Reps. Sherwood L. Boehlert (R-N.Y.) and Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.) will offer an amendment to remove incentives for offshore oil drilling from the bill and ensure that funding is not spent on environmentally damaging development along our fragile coasts.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
The House of Representatives on Wednesday approved and sent to the Senate two bills designed to help the U.S. regain an edge in high-performance supercomputing that might lead to government contracts for Palo Alto-based Hewlett-Packard Co. and other computer makers.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | From Associated Press
Moderate Republicans sided with environmentalists in the House on Friday to hand a surprising defeat to Western conservatives who had proposed logging and other projects to ease fire threats in national forests. On a 201-181 vote, the House unexpectedly defeated the "Forest Recovery and Protection Act of 1998" by Rep. Robert F. Smith (R-Ore.), chairman of the House Agriculture Committee.
NEWS
October 5, 1998 | From Associated Press
It's a common ploy at budget time: Slip controversial measures into big spending bills in hopes they will pass quietly into law. In the final week of Congress, business lobbyists are working with friendly lawmakers to attach dozens of provisions, or "riders," that would curb environmental regulations on mining, oil companies and developers. But if these become law, it won't happen without a fight.
OPINION
February 13, 2003
In its rush to pass a giant federal spending bill, Congress is within an inch of overturning years of national forest protection without debate or public consideration. Doing the bidding of the Alaskan timber industry is Sen. Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.
OPINION
February 20, 2004
The self-righteous "sky is falling" tone of a report accusing the Bush administration of tailoring science to narrow political goals may be a tipoff that at least some of its authors have an agenda other than the disinterested pursuit of truth. Some authors of the 46-page study, organized by the liberal Massachusetts-based Union of Concerned Scientists, certainly have strong political views about President Bush. Still, the reputations of most of the signatories are hard to impeach.
NATIONAL
March 7, 2003 | Nick Anderson, Times Staff Writer
With the space agency facing a severe "brain drain," NASA's chief urged Congress on Thursday to grant him broad powers to recruit and retain top scientists and engineers in one of his first legislative initiatives since the Columbia disaster. NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe insisted that he had no evidence that personnel troubles led to the loss of the space shuttle on Feb. 1. But he warned a Senate committee of "alarming" workforce trends that could jeopardize future projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995
The strange contortions in the House of Representatives over crippling the Environmental Protection Agency speak volumes about internal Republican divisions and fears over pushing back environmental safeguards. The welcome news here is the emergence of a substantial bloc of Republicans, most notably Sherwood L. Boehlert of Upstate New York, who see potential disaster if the reactionary steamroller over health and environmental regulations moves on.
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