Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSheryl Lee
IN THE NEWS

Sheryl Lee

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1997 | Steve Hochman
First seen by most people as the tarp-wrapped corpse of Laura Palmer in "Twin Peaks," Sheryl Lee, 30, is very much alive as an independent cinema presence, now starring as a young bride in "Bliss." Recently, she's also skirted the mainstream playing Bathsheba in TNT's "David" and an undead hooker in John Carpenter's "The Vampires" (which just began shooting in New Mexico). HOME: "I live in Laurel Canyon. Hiding. Reminds me of Colorado, where I grew up.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Twin Peaks" burst onto the television scene in 1990 with more heat than a cup of damn fine coffee, launching that phrase and the burning question "Who killed Laura Palmer?" into the national lexicon. "Peaks freaks" sipped coffee and munched cherry pie at viewing parties, made pilgrimages to the town of Snoqualmie, Wash.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting at lunch in a fine French restaurant in Hollywood, her elbows resting lightly on the white linen tablecloth, a shock of blond hair falling into her eyes, her husky voice filling the light airy room, actress Sheryl Lee discussed death. "I don't think death is a negative thing at all. I think it can be very positive. I read a wonderful quote the other day that said death is like taking off a tight shoe. And I think that's brilliant.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1997 | Steve Hochman
First seen by most people as the tarp-wrapped corpse of Laura Palmer in "Twin Peaks," Sheryl Lee, 30, is very much alive as an independent cinema presence, now starring as a young bride in "Bliss." Recently, she's also skirted the mainstream playing Bathsheba in TNT's "David" and an undead hooker in John Carpenter's "The Vampires" (which just began shooting in New Mexico). HOME: "I live in Laurel Canyon. Hiding. Reminds me of Colorado, where I grew up.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1998 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Twin Peaks" burst onto the television scene in 1990 with more heat than a cup of damn fine coffee, launching that phrase and the burning question "Who killed Laura Palmer?" into the national lexicon. "Peaks freaks" sipped coffee and munched cherry pie at viewing parties, made pilgrimages to the town of Snoqualmie, Wash.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Standing out among the humdrum blues and pinks and pale yellows of the baby department is some-thing unusual from an unlikely source. Sheryl Lee Ralph, the newest addition to the cast of CBS' "Designing Women," recently appeared at the Nordstrom South Bay store to show off her new line for infants and children. Le Petit Etienne, named for the actress-designer's young son, features loose, one-size-fits-all clothes for toddlers in vibrant African-inspired patterns.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1997 | ROBERT STEVENS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of the morning, Sheryl Lee Ralph has had a determined, don't-talk-to-me-unless-you-have-something-important-to-say look on her face. But this moment is different. Right now, Ralph is loose and smiling. "Everybody stop what you're doing for a sec and come close," Ralph says. "Y'all got to come close, you know I need that vibe."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2008 | Geoff Boucher; Chris Lee; Mark Olsen; Rachel Abramowitz; Scott Timberg; Patrick Day; Kenneth Turan
The 25 best L.A. films of the last 25 years "Los ANGELES isn't a real city," people have said, "it just plays one on camera." It was a clever line once upon a time, but all that has changed. Los Angeles is the most complicated community in America -- make no mistake, it is a community -- and over the last 25 years, it has been both celebrated and savaged on the big screen with amazing efficacy. Damaged souls and flawless weather, canyon love and beach city menace, homeboys and credit card girls, freeways and fedoras, power lines and palm trees . . . again and again, moviegoers all over the world have sat in the dark and stared up at our Los Angeles, even if it was one populated by corrupt cops or a jabbering cartoon rabbit.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Love in Vegas: "Designing Women" is doing its first-ever location shoot today. Actor Meshach Taylor and a crew are in Las Vegas for an episode in which his character, Anthony, visits the Folies Bergere, falls head over heels for the lead singer (played by Sheryl Lee Ralph) and wakes up married to her the next morning.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 1992 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Biblical Broadway: Sheryl Lee, who was Laura Palmer in "Twin Peaks," is playing the title role in "Salome" on the New York stage this summer. Lee joins Al Pacino, who plays King Herod, her stepfather who also desires her, in the production based on the biblical story at the Circle in the Square theater. The two actors perform the "Dance of the Seven Veils," a piece choreographed by Lar Lubovitch, known for his New York-based dance company.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1997 | ROBERT STEVENS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of the morning, Sheryl Lee Ralph has had a determined, don't-talk-to-me-unless-you-have-something-important-to-say look on her face. But this moment is different. Right now, Ralph is loose and smiling. "Everybody stop what you're doing for a sec and come close," Ralph says. "Y'all got to come close, you know I need that vibe."
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | CINDY LaFAVRE YORKS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Standing out among the humdrum blues and pinks and pale yellows of the baby department is some-thing unusual from an unlikely source. Sheryl Lee Ralph, the newest addition to the cast of CBS' "Designing Women," recently appeared at the Nordstrom South Bay store to show off her new line for infants and children. Le Petit Etienne, named for the actress-designer's young son, features loose, one-size-fits-all clothes for toddlers in vibrant African-inspired patterns.
NEWS
February 17, 1991 | DANIEL CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sitting at lunch in a fine French restaurant in Hollywood, her elbows resting lightly on the white linen tablecloth, a shock of blond hair falling into her eyes, her husky voice filling the light airy room, actress Sheryl Lee discussed death. "I don't think death is a negative thing at all. I think it can be very positive. I read a wonderful quote the other day that said death is like taking off a tight shoe. And I think that's brilliant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1990
Why does Hollywood continue to underestimate audiences? I'm referring to the casting of Sheryl Lee Ralph in "Randall and Juliet," the remake of the French film "Mama, There's a Man in Your Bed" (Cinefile, April 22). The reason "Mama" is such a special movie is that actress Firmine Richard is a heavy woman, dark-skinned and not beautiful in a "Hollywood" way. Do the producers believe that American audiences will respond to the movie only if a thin and beautiful black woman plays the lead role?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|