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Shetland Islands

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TRAVEL
January 24, 1993 | KIM UPTON
Scotland's picturesque Shetland Islands, where the storm-wrecked oil tanker Braer earlier this month poured 25 million gallons of crude oil into the Bay of Quendale, has launched an $800,000 advertising campaign--a huge amount by local standards--to try to safeguard the islands' tourism industry, valued at more than $35 million.
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TRAVEL
June 13, 1993 | JOHN McKINNEY
Residents of the Shetland Islands, remote North Sea enclaves 120 to 150 miles north of the Scottish mainland, have been known to pull a visitor's leg now and then. They say the Shetlands have two seasons: nine months of winter and three months of bad weather. Actually, the North Atlantic Drift keeps the climate surprisingly mild.
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NEWS
January 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
The wrecked oil tanker Braer broke up against the rocky cliffs of the Shetland Islands, releasing virtually all that remained of its cargo of nearly 25 million gallons of Norwegian crude oil. The 790-foot vessel broke into at least three pieces after being grounded against the rugged edge of the Bay of Quendale for a week. The cargo was more than twice the amount spilled by the Exxon Valdez in Alaska in 1989.
TRAVEL
January 24, 1993 | KIM UPTON
Scotland's picturesque Shetland Islands, where the storm-wrecked oil tanker Braer earlier this month poured 25 million gallons of crude oil into the Bay of Quendale, has launched an $800,000 advertising campaign--a huge amount by local standards--to try to safeguard the islands' tourism industry, valued at more than $35 million.
TRAVEL
June 13, 1993 | JOHN McKINNEY
Residents of the Shetland Islands, remote North Sea enclaves 120 to 150 miles north of the Scottish mainland, have been known to pull a visitor's leg now and then. They say the Shetlands have two seasons: nine months of winter and three months of bad weather. Actually, the North Atlantic Drift keeps the climate surprisingly mild.
NEWS
January 6, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 700-foot tanker carrying almost 25 million gallons of oil ran aground and was breaking up in the Shetland Islands on Tuesday, creating a potentially major environmental disaster in an internationally known wildlife area. The single-hulled ship, the Liberian-registered Braer, was carrying almost double the amount of crude that was aboard the Exxon Valdez when it ran aground in Alaska in 1989.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local officials said Thursday that they are preparing a contingency plan to move inhabitants away from coastal areas affected by the massive oil spill from the grounded tanker Braer. The disclosure came as another day of stormy seas and skies kept salvage teams from boarding the ship, which lost power and ran aground Tuesday on the rocky coast of southern Shetland Island, north of Scotland.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As aerial crews sprayed chemicals to try to disperse a huge slick and wildlife experts sought to save oil-sodden birds, recriminations were exchanged Wednesday over what caused the tanker Braer to run aground here, spilling its 25-million-gallon cargo of light crude.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wrecked oil tanker Braer apparently was breaking up on the rocks of this island late Friday, even as Scottish authorities banned all fishing in the area because of pollution risks. About half of the crude oil, which has contaminated the coast and adjacent fields, is probably still aboard the 700-foot tanker, said Capt. Geert Koffeman of the Dutch salvage company Smit Tak, which will try to pump out the remaining cargo. Capt.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | GRAHAM HEATHCOTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With the population of Papa Stour down to 26, farmer Ted Gray believes the survival of his island community is at risk. So in May he called a radio station to appeal for settlers, setting off a wave of publicity that carried all the way to Australia. "Come and look. Come and see the sunshine. Come and see the green fields and the blue sea and you'll love the place," he promised. He got more than 400 telephone calls and 500 letters.
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Services
The wrecked oil tanker Braer broke up against the rocky cliffs of the Shetland Islands, releasing virtually all that remained of its cargo of nearly 25 million gallons of Norwegian crude oil. The 790-foot vessel broke into at least three pieces after being grounded against the rugged edge of the Bay of Quendale for a week. The cargo was more than twice the amount spilled by the Exxon Valdez in Alaska in 1989.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disaster was averted shortly after 5 a.m. on a clear, dark morning last October. The Kenai, a British Petroleum-chartered oil tanker carrying 35 million gallons of Alaskan crude, developed steering trouble 16 miles from the site of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill. The tanker was less than two minutes from running aground on Middle Rock, an old nemesis for ship captains operating in Prince William Sound. But the Kenai quickly radioed its tug escort, required by the U.S.
NEWS
January 9, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wrecked oil tanker Braer apparently was breaking up on the rocks of this island late Friday, even as Scottish authorities banned all fishing in the area because of pollution risks. About half of the crude oil, which has contaminated the coast and adjacent fields, is probably still aboard the 700-foot tanker, said Capt. Geert Koffeman of the Dutch salvage company Smit Tak, which will try to pump out the remaining cargo. Capt.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local officials said Thursday that they are preparing a contingency plan to move inhabitants away from coastal areas affected by the massive oil spill from the grounded tanker Braer. The disclosure came as another day of stormy seas and skies kept salvage teams from boarding the ship, which lost power and ran aground Tuesday on the rocky coast of southern Shetland Island, north of Scotland.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As aerial crews sprayed chemicals to try to disperse a huge slick and wildlife experts sought to save oil-sodden birds, recriminations were exchanged Wednesday over what caused the tanker Braer to run aground here, spilling its 25-million-gallon cargo of light crude.
NEWS
January 6, 1993 | WILLIAM TUOHY and MAURA DOLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A 700-foot tanker carrying almost 25 million gallons of oil ran aground and was breaking up in the Shetland Islands on Tuesday, creating a potentially major environmental disaster in an internationally known wildlife area. The single-hulled ship, the Liberian-registered Braer, was carrying almost double the amount of crude that was aboard the Exxon Valdez when it ran aground in Alaska in 1989.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1993 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disaster was averted shortly after 5 a.m. on a clear, dark morning last October. The Kenai, a British Petroleum-chartered oil tanker carrying 35 million gallons of Alaskan crude, developed steering trouble 16 miles from the site of the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill. The tanker was less than two minutes from running aground on Middle Rock, an old nemesis for ship captains operating in Prince William Sound. But the Kenai quickly radioed its tug escort, required by the U.S.
NEWS
July 19, 1993 | Reuters
Chevron Corp. said Sunday that there had been a fire alarm on its North Sea Ninian South oil production platform but that the incident was minor and had not affected production. A spokesman said diesel fuel got into a turbine exhaust causing black smoke that triggered an alarm Saturday on the platform, 100 miles northeast of the Shetland Islands.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | GRAHAM HEATHCOTE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With the population of Papa Stour down to 26, farmer Ted Gray believes the survival of his island community is at risk. So in May he called a radio station to appeal for settlers, setting off a wave of publicity that carried all the way to Australia. "Come and look. Come and see the sunshine. Come and see the green fields and the blue sea and you'll love the place," he promised. He got more than 400 telephone calls and 500 letters.
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