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Shifra Goldman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In the early 1970s, when Shifra Goldman proposed a doctoral dissertation on modern Mexican art, her professors at UCLA sneered. Compared to European art, the art of Latin America was, in their view, imitative, too political, unworthy of serious scholarly attention. But Goldman, a scrappy civil rights and anti-Vietnam War activist who went back to school in her mid-30s, refused to consider a more mainstream topic. Describing herself years later as a person who was "born on the margins, lived on the margins and … always sympathized with the margins," she bided her time for several years until a more open-minded professor arrived who was willing to supervise her research.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In the early 1970s, when Shifra Goldman proposed a doctoral dissertation on modern Mexican art, her professors at UCLA sneered. Compared to European art, the art of Latin America was, in their view, imitative, too political, unworthy of serious scholarly attention. But Goldman, a scrappy civil rights and anti-Vietnam War activist who went back to school in her mid-30s, refused to consider a more mainstream topic. Describing herself years later as a person who was "born on the margins, lived on the margins and … always sympathized with the margins," she bided her time for several years until a more open-minded professor arrived who was willing to supervise her research.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
"I don't want to be the grande dame of anything, God forbid," Shifra Goldman bristles, recalling how she was described in a review of her recent book, "Dimensions of the Americas: Art and Social Change in Latin America and the United States." The word "distinguished" before her name also makes her uncomfortable, she says, but she warms to the term "pioneer."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1995 | Leah Ollman, Leah Ollman is a frequent contributor to Calendar.
"I don't want to be the grande dame of anything, God forbid," Shifra Goldman bristles, recalling how she was described in a review of her recent book, "Dimensions of the Americas: Art and Social Change in Latin America and the United States." The word "distinguished" before her name also makes her uncomfortable, she says, but she warms to the term "pioneer."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bleeding hearts--wrenched from the body and adorned with the paraphernalia of intense religiosity--have upped the pulse rate of Mexican art for centuries, and so have other forms of visceral expressionism based on influences from both Aztec and Spanish Catholic cultures. Summoning up a world of literally gut-baring imagery, Shifra Goldman lectured on "The Heart of Mexican Art: Image, Myth and Ideology" on Sunday afternoon at Newport Harbor Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Exhibition curators generally speak with unbridled enthusiasm about their own shows. They soft-pedal shortcomings or ignore them altogether-- if they can see them. Shifra M. Goldman, guest curator of "Seven Decades: Modern Mexican Art From the Bernard Lewin Collection," at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana through April 25, spoke in a recent interview to her show's weaknesses as well as its strengths.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1992 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shifra Goldman's lecture Thursday night at Mesa College will be part expose, part prescription. Titled, "How to Collapse 500 Years of Conquest and Border-Making into 60 Minutes," the talk will trace how the European conquest of the Americas in the 15th Century launched a process of domination that continues today in politics, culture and academia.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1997
Art historian Shifra Goldman will lecture on "The Great Murals of David Alfaro Siquieros" on Thursday at 7 p.m. at Self-Help Graphics, 3802 Cesar Chavez Ave., East Los Angeles. The two-hour lecture is free, and light refreshments will be served. Information: (213) 881-6444.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1997
"The American Dream: The Reception of Latin American Art in the United States and Europe," a daylong conference planned in conjunction with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art's exhibition of Mexican artworks from the Bernard and Edith Lewin collection, will be held Jan. 10 at the museum. The morning session, 10 a.m. to noon, will cover the influence of Mexican modernism on social realism, the Works Project Administration, Abstract Expressionism and art of the 1960s.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1997
Christopher Knight's review ("A Turbulent Chapter of a Storied Career," April 6) is his second that mentions David Alfaro Siqueiros' 1932 Olvera Street mural "America Tropical," which only became visible to art critics since the Getty undertook its preservation. Now it is to be depoliticized. Bad historiography. Its imagery isn't "generic," as Knight wrote. Siqueiros explicitly stated that he derived the image of the bald eagle over the crucified Indian before the pyramid from the U.S. 25-cent coin, where it can be seen to this day. Only the head has been turned.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1994 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Exhibition curators generally speak with unbridled enthusiasm about their own shows. They soft-pedal shortcomings or ignore them altogether-- if they can see them. Shifra M. Goldman, guest curator of "Seven Decades: Modern Mexican Art From the Bernard Lewin Collection," at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana through April 25, spoke in a recent interview to her show's weaknesses as well as its strengths.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1993 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bleeding hearts--wrenched from the body and adorned with the paraphernalia of intense religiosity--have upped the pulse rate of Mexican art for centuries, and so have other forms of visceral expressionism based on influences from both Aztec and Spanish Catholic cultures. Summoning up a world of literally gut-baring imagery, Shifra Goldman lectured on "The Heart of Mexican Art: Image, Myth and Ideology" on Sunday afternoon at Newport Harbor Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1992 | LEAH OLLMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shifra Goldman's lecture Thursday night at Mesa College will be part expose, part prescription. Titled, "How to Collapse 500 Years of Conquest and Border-Making into 60 Minutes," the talk will trace how the European conquest of the Americas in the 15th Century launched a process of domination that continues today in politics, culture and academia.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1987
When it comes to arts or artists originating in Latin America, critic William Wilson seems stuck in a chauvinist time trap of the 1950s. Reading his columns, one would never know that civil rights battles of Chicanos and Latinos ever took place. In 1974, Wilson got a "headache" from the Los Four exhibit of Chicano art, and wondered what happened to the museum "as a bastion of cultural excellence." In 1979, he considered Mexico's world famous artist Rufino Tamayo a painter who "ought to be able to paint" and whose work at the Guggenheim Museum "made you think you need a visit to the optometrist."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 2001 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
"The Broadway Mural," John Valadez's landmark, 60-foot-long painting of downtown Los Angeles street life, has been rescued from the auction block. Peter Norton, a Los Angeles-based computer guru and a major collector of contemporary art, has purchased the epic artwork, along with a group of 28 portraits by Valadez.
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