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Shigetoshi Hasegawa

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SPORTS
July 22, 2002
"They're good since I left." Shigetoshi Hasegawa, Mariner reliever, on why the Angels are an improved team this season.
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SPORTS
July 22, 2002
"They're good since I left." Shigetoshi Hasegawa, Mariner reliever, on why the Angels are an improved team this season.
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SPORTS
May 31, 2001 | Bill Shaikin
The Angels feared they might lose versatile reliever Shigetoshi Hasegawa for the season because of a partially torn rotator cuff, but Hasegawa said Wednesday he was told he could return in two to three weeks. Dr. Lewis Yocum examined him Tuesday and told him surgery does not appear necessary. Hasegawa, currently on a strengthening regimen, said he expects to resume throwing soon.
SPORTS
March 2, 2002 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Shigetoshi Hasegawa stands in the Seattle Mariners' clubhouse, he hasn't quite gotten over his divorce from the Angels. "I put the Seattle uniform on, and I feel like an enemy," Hasegawa said before the Angels' 15-2 Cactus League victory over the Mariners Friday. Hasegawa didn't want to leave the Angels, the team with which he signed after jumping from Japanese baseball to the major leagues.
SPORTS
March 2, 1997 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
That was not King Kong holding a Louisville Slugger in Scottsdale Stadium. It only seemed that way for Angel pitcher Shigetoshi Hasegawa, whose knees buckled a bit as he peered into the batter's box before his first major league exhibition pitch. Awaiting Hasegawa's third-inning delivery was Barry Bonds, the $11.5- million man, the San Francisco Giant outfielder who is one of baseball's most-feared hitters. Welcome to America.
SPORTS
February 23, 1998 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If this spring training was any more relaxing for pitcher Shigetoshi Hasegawa, the Japanese right-hander might doze off in the Tempe Diablo Stadium clubhouse. Hasegawa knows how to read bench coach Joe Maddon's daily practice schedules, which can be more confusing than calculus to the uninitiated, and he knows how to perform all of Manager Terry Collins' drills. He has many friends on the team and has greater command of the English language. But the best part about no longer being a rookie?
SPORTS
January 10, 1997 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unable to acquire free-agent pitchers Steve Avery or Doug Drabek to bolster their rotation, the Angels on Thursday turned for help to Shigetoshi Hasegawa from Japan. And get this, the plan calls for Hasegawa to pitch middle relief next season rather than fill a spot in the rotation.
SPORTS
January 15, 1997 | ELLIOTT TEAFORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tuesday night was no time to make an international faux pas, this being his major league debut and all, so Japanese right-hander Shigetoshi Hasegawa huddled with his agent to get some advice. "Should I be serious? Or should I be funny?" Hasegawa asked Ed Kleven a few minutes before his first news conference as an Angel. It took only a few moments before the assembled international press corps learned which tact Hasegawa decided on. Now if only Hasegawa's fastball is as good as his wit.
SPORTS
June 19, 1997 | MIKE DOWNEY
Terry Collins had a cute idea for the Angel-Dodger mini-series, Part II. The manager of the Angels gave serious thought to using Shigetoshi Hasegawa as his starting pitcher, on the very night that the Dodgers would be sending Hideo Nomo to the mound. It was a real inspiration, having two Japanese pitchers oppose each other here for the first time. Imagine such a thing happening at Dodger Stadium, 50 years after Jackie Robinson broke new ground in another ethnically significant area.
SPORTS
June 7, 2000 | TIM BROWN and BILL SHAIKIN
More than three hours before game time, and 17 hours after Barry Bonds hit his changeup 408 feet, Shigetoshi Hasegawa poked the rewind button, then play. Changeup--home run. Rewind. Play. Changeup--home run. Angel hitters have had their chances to clean up after Angel starters in part because of the bullpen. Hasegawa is 4-1 with a 3.13 earned-run average in 19 appearances, and along with Mike Fyhrie, Al Levine and Troy Percival, has been sturdy lately. Except for that changeup, though.
SPORTS
August 12, 2001 | Mike DiGiovanna
It has been six weeks since Shigetoshi Hasegawa returned from a six-week stint on the disabled list because of a partial tear in his rotator cuff, but the reliever is still struggling to return to the form that made him the Angels' most valuable pitcher in 2000. The body is willing, but the mind . . . "I'm just a little scared still," said Hasegawa, who gave up three runs and three hits in the ninth inning of Friday night's 8-7 victory over Toronto.
SPORTS
July 1, 2001 | Chris Foster
Scott Schoeneweis, who gave up nine runs in 2 2/3 innings of a 9-5 loss to the Seattle Mariners on Friday night, regained his composure Saturday and was able to talk about the loss. "I didn't feel like there was really anything to say," said Schoeneweis, who declined interviews Friday. Schoeneweis has had his ups and downs in his last eight starts. During that span he has a 7.77 earned-run average and has given up 60 hits in 46 2/3 innings.
SPORTS
May 31, 2001 | Bill Shaikin
The Angels feared they might lose versatile reliever Shigetoshi Hasegawa for the season because of a partially torn rotator cuff, but Hasegawa said Wednesday he was told he could return in two to three weeks. Dr. Lewis Yocum examined him Tuesday and told him surgery does not appear necessary. Hasegawa, currently on a strengthening regimen, said he expects to resume throwing soon.
SPORTS
May 27, 2001 | Mike DiGiovanna
The Angel bullpen was dealt a severe blow Saturday when setup man Shigetoshi Hasegawa was diagnosed with a partial tear of the rotator cuff in his throwing shoulder, an injury that will sideline him indefinitely. No surgery is planned, but if the right-hander doesn't respond favorably to therapy in the next few weeks, he could need surgery that would knock him out for the season. "This wasn't good news," Manager Mike Scioscia said.
SPORTS
May 13, 2001 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
An awful trip grew even worse Saturday for Angel reliever Shigetoshi Hasegawa, who gave up three runs--two earned--in the eighth inning of a 4-1 loss to the Tigers. The right-hander failed to preserve a 1-1 tie when he gave up a triple to Bobby Higginson, two walks, an RBI single to Deivi Cruz and a sacrifice fly to Juan Encarnacion.
SPORTS
August 29, 2000 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
The job Shigetoshi Hasegawa has done filling in for injured closer Troy Percival has been too impressive for Mike Scioscia to ignore. The Angel manager acknowledged Monday that Hasegawa and Percival will handle closing responsibilities "in a tandem role" while Percival rebounds from an inflamed nerve in his elbow that sidelined him for three weeks. "We're a better team when we have an effective Percival closing," Scioscia said. "But the variable right now is Troy's health.
SPORTS
July 1, 2001 | Chris Foster
Scott Schoeneweis, who gave up nine runs in 2 2/3 innings of a 9-5 loss to the Seattle Mariners on Friday night, regained his composure Saturday and was able to talk about the loss. "I didn't feel like there was really anything to say," said Schoeneweis, who declined interviews Friday. Schoeneweis has had his ups and downs in his last eight starts. During that span he has a 7.77 earned-run average and has given up 60 hits in 46 2/3 innings.
SPORTS
August 24, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN
Red Sox stood on all three bases Monday night. It was the bottom of the 11th inning. There were no outs. The Angels led by one run, which didn't seem nearly enough. So here came Shigetoshi Hasegawa, slim as salad lettuce, not at all fierce looking and wearing the biggest smile possible. "This was going to be fun," Hasegawa said. "With all the people cheering against me and all the weird things which had happened in the game already, I could hardly wait to get out there and throw the ball."
SPORTS
July 30, 2000 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
It almost seems as if Angel reliever Shigetoshi Hasegawa could pitch two innings a day for the rest of his life. The Japanese right-hander has never had arm problems in his four-year Angel career. Of his 44 appearances this season, 19 have lasted two innings or more. Twice this season, he has pitched on three consecutive days. "But he's not as rubber-armed as you think," Angel closer Troy Percival said. "He goes out there when he should have a day off and finds a way to get it done.
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