Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShiite Muslims Iraq
IN THE NEWS

Shiite Muslims Iraq

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq continued to obey an allied edict to keep its aircraft out of the southern part of the country Saturday despite an upsurge of air activity just north of the "no-fly" zone and bellicose rhetoric from Saddam Hussein's Cabinet, the Pentagon reported. "There have been no (Iraqi) flights south of the line of 32 degrees north latitude," Pentagon spokesman Bob Hall said. "Basically everything's quiet."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 28, 1993 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The State Department denounced the Iraqi government Friday for continued human rights violations in its efforts to drive Shiite Muslims from their ancestral home in the country's southeastern marshlands. "We have verified extensive draining and burning of the marshes, the burning of villages, and ongoing artillery attacks on civilian centers," the department said in a statement.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | From Associated Press
Just days before U.S.-led allies plan to bar Iraqi aircraft from the south, a senior U.N. official failed Friday to persuade Iraq to allow relief workers and armed guards to remain in the country. U.N. officials said Jan Eliasson, who had held five days of talks in Baghdad, will leave today for London to brief Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali. Eliasson, a Swede, is the U.N. undersecretary general for humanitarian affairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1993 | ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The talk at the Pomona mosque was supposed to be on religious themes, but what the Iraqi immigrant congregation most wanted to hear about was politics inside their homeland. So for a couple of hours Saturday afternoon, they listened raptly as the Ayatollah Sayed Bahrul-Uloom filled them in on the latest developments--particularly on the drive to topple Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arab governments are expressing growing concern about an allied plan to protect Shiite Muslim rebels in southern Iraq, fearing that the plan could lead to dangerous new instability in the Middle East and threaten the integrity of Iraq. No Arab government except Kuwait has expressed enthusiastic support for the plan to bar Iraqi government flights over the southern marshlands.
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | ART PINE and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration said Wednesday that it will ask the U.N. Security Council to pass a new resolution that would permit military action against Iraq, if necessary, to stop Saddam Hussein's air attacks against Shiite Muslim villages in the south. Edward Perkins, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, told Congress that such a measure is needed because a previous U.N.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
Iraqi authorities have arrested thousands of Shiite Muslims in southern Iraq on charges of aiding anti-government forces, an Iran-based opposition radio station reported Sunday. Family members and supporters of the Shiite opposition were targeted in the arrests, according to the Voice of the Iraqi People, the broadcasting arm of the Supreme Assembly for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq.
NEWS
June 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The head of the Environmental Protection Agency said Monday that the 450 or so oil well fires still raging in Kuwait have created a hellish atmosphere, but the health risks from the oily black clouds are not as bad as had been anticipated. "We do not see the kind of acute effects that we had feared," William K. Reilly told reporters after briefing President Bush on his recent trip to the region.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Kurdish leaders said that a key obstacle to an accord on Kurdish autonomy is a previously undisclosed demand by President Saddam Hussein that they cut direct ties with the West and help him fight the Shiite Muslim minority. They said that representatives of Hussein set out the new conditions in a document submitted to Kurdish negotiators in early June. The disclosure cast doubt on the prospects for an early agreement.
NEWS
April 24, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration said Tuesday that it hopes to begin shipping relief supplies to Iran to be distributed to Kurdish refugees from Iraq in what would be the first such direct commerce since events that led to the Iran-Contra scandal. The contacts with Iran, which have been conducted through Swiss intermediaries, have been limited to refugee matters, White House officials said.
NEWS
October 3, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wind slicing across the top of the reeds sends an uneasy murmur through the hot afternoon. Half a mile away, clouds of smoke from the morning's artillery barrage feed a gray pall that hangs low over the marsh. A long canoe makes its way along a narrow sliver of water, gliding between impenetrable walls of green reeds. Suddenly, behind one of the reed walls, those in the canoe can see a flash of white and hear the shuffling of feet.
NEWS
September 16, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraqi Shiite Muslim leaders say they are building support to launch a new popular uprising against President Saddam Hussein, hoping a united opposition front will lure weapons and supplies from the United States, Iran, Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. Gathering for a crucial meeting in Tehran this week to heal rifts within the Iraqi opposition, Shiite leaders say they have received encouragement from U.S.
NEWS
September 13, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Casting himself as a pious, peace-loving, born-again democrat, Iraqi President Saddam Hussein is employing a new strategy aimed at defeating President Bush not on the Iraqi battlefield or in the skies overhead but in the American political arena.
NEWS
September 7, 1992 | From Associated Press
Iraqi authorities have arrested thousands of Shiite Muslims in southern Iraq on charges of aiding anti-government forces, an Iran-based opposition radio station reported Sunday. Family members and supporters of the Shiite opposition were targeted in the arrests, according to the Voice of the Iraqi People, the broadcasting arm of the Supreme Assembly for the Islamic Revolution in Iraq.
NEWS
August 31, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although Iraq has not challenged the 4-day-old ban on the use of its aircraft in the southern part of the country, there are indications that Saddam Hussein's regime is readying a new ground offensive against rebellious Shiite Muslims in the area, a top U.S. official said Sunday.
NEWS
August 30, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq continued to obey an allied edict to keep its aircraft out of the southern part of the country Saturday despite an upsurge of air activity just north of the "no-fly" zone and bellicose rhetoric from Saddam Hussein's Cabinet, the Pentagon reported. "There have been no (Iraqi) flights south of the line of 32 degrees north latitude," Pentagon spokesman Bob Hall said. "Basically everything's quiet."
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Bush Administration viewed the Iraqi insurrection against Saddam Hussein with growing unease Tuesday as it faced the prospects of two unattractive results: A postwar Iraq led by a weakened Hussein, or, even less desirable in the White House assessment, a country led by an Islamic fundamentalist regime allied with Iran.
NEWS
November 6, 1991 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Complaining of "paralysis" in Bush Administration policy toward Iraq, senior Pentagon officials are pushing for covert military and political aid to Iraqi dissidents in a more aggressive effort to topple President Saddam Hussein, Defense Department sources say. So far, their calls have been rejected by the White House and the State Department, whose officials are distrustful of Iraqi opposition leaders and appear to prefer a stable Iraq with Hussein in power to the risks of a U.S.
NEWS
August 27, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush announced Wednesday that allied warplanes will assert control of the skies over southern Iraq, a gesture designed to break Baghdad's repressive control over the Shiite Muslim-dominated region and to signal to Iraqi dissidents that the West continues to seek the fall of Saddam Hussein.
NEWS
August 26, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arab governments are expressing growing concern about an allied plan to protect Shiite Muslim rebels in southern Iraq, fearing that the plan could lead to dangerous new instability in the Middle East and threaten the integrity of Iraq. No Arab government except Kuwait has expressed enthusiastic support for the plan to bar Iraqi government flights over the southern marshlands.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|