Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsShiley Inc
IN THE NEWS

Shiley Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 3, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ and DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Orange County judge Thursday accepted an eleventh-hour settlement between Shiley Inc. and 256 recipients of a potentially fatal artificial heart valve once manufactured by the Irvine company. The Wednesday night out-of-court settlement in the cases of Ruth Barillas, 54, of La Mesa, Calif.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
October 3, 1995 | BARBARA MARSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday allowed a Philadelphia woman to sue Pfizer Inc. and its Irvine-based unit, Shiley Inc., over a heart valve that she had removed. The court's decision is likely to prompt others to proceed with efforts to recover more than they could have received through a class-action settlement with the two companies, attorneys said.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 19, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The company that bought most of Shiley Inc.'s medical product lines earlier this year confirmed Thursday that it is laying off 200 workers here as part of a reorganization. Sorin Biomedical, a subsidiary of Italy's Sorin Biomedica S.p.A., said the reorganization will include splitting Sorin's product lines into four business groups. That will leave Sorin with about 770 employees at its U.S. headquarters in Irvine and sales offices across the country.
BUSINESS
October 4, 1994
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review the dismissal of an appeal that would have challenged a $215-million court settlement reached two years ago in the Shiley heart valve case. The decision clears the way for payments to more than 50,000 recipients of potentially defective heart valves made by Irvine-based Shiley, a unit of Pfizer Inc. in New York. The settlement, reached in U.S.
BUSINESS
June 10, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The maker of a potentially fatal heart valve has agreed to modify its offer to recipients, which could persuade more recipients that they should accept the proposal, attorneys for the patients said Tuesday. Shiley Inc. in Irvine and its parent company, Pfizer Inc. in New York, had initially offered to pay $75 million for research and valve replacement surgery and an additional $80 million to $130 million for physician consultations and anxiety-related medical expenses.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1991 | CHRIS WOODYARD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal health officials have ordered Shiley Inc. to send special notices to about 350 recipients of mechanical heart valves worldwide who may have been implanted with the potentially defective devices. Under pressure from lawsuits and the Food and Drug Administration, the Irvine-based subsidiary of drug and medical giant Pfizer Inc. began a program in December, 1990, to directly notify valve recipients about possible life-threatening fractures of the devices.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1992 | TED JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Irvine-based maker of a potentially defective heart valve will appeal an Orange County Superior Court judge's ruling that allows out-of-state recipients of the valves to sue in California. Officials at Pfizer Inc., the New York parent of Shiley Inc. of Irvine, said Monday that they will claim that Judge William F. Rylaarsdam's decision last week was "incorrect and inconsistent" with previous court decisions.
BUSINESS
October 2, 1992 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shiley Inc. said Thursday that researchers have launched human clinical studies using experimental X-ray technology to search for life-threatening cracks in the company's heart valves. If proved accurate, the procedure, being tested at a Michigan hospital, could ease the anguish of thousands of heart-valve recipients who have lived for years in uncertainty, not knowing if their surgically implanted valves are flawed. The Shiley valves have been implanted in about 51,000 people worldwide.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1992 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The artificial heart valve clicks 60 times a minute. Some patients find the mechanical heartbeat soothing--audible proof that their lifesaving valve is working. But to John Civatte, who was implanted with a potentially defective Shiley heart valve in 1986--just nine months before the manufacturer pulled the device from the market--the ticking sounds like a time bomb.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pfizer Inc., the parent company of Irvine-based Shiley Inc., said Thursday that a Los Angeles Superior Court has dismissed a consumer group's lawsuit seeking to force the company to notify recipients of Shiley heart valves about potential defects. Judge Ronald M. Sohigian on Wednesday accepted the company's argument that Congress has given the U.S. Food and Drug Administration authority that supersedes the state's in the area of medical devices.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shiley to Pay $20 Million: Heart valve maker Shiley Inc. and its parent, Pfizer Inc., have agreed to pay the federal government $10.75 million to settle allegations that it made false claims about potentially fatal artificial valves. The amount is what the government estimates it paid for the valves through its health insurance programs, Medicare and the Veterans Health Administration, multiplied by 2 1/2.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1994 | ANNE MICHAUD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heart-valve maker Shiley Inc. and its parent, Pfizer Inc., have agreed to pay the federal government $10.75 million to settle accusations that they made false claims about the potentially fatal artificial valves it manufactured from 1979 to 1986.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ and DEBORA VRANA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Orange County judge Thursday accepted an eleventh-hour settlement between Shiley Inc. and 256 recipients of a potentially fatal artificial heart valve once manufactured by the Irvine company. The Wednesday night out-of-court settlement in the cases of Ruth Barillas, 54, of La Mesa, Calif.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shiley Inc., which recalled a batch of heart valves because of a tendency of the devices to fracture, struck an 11th-hour settlement with 259 valve recipients late Wednesday, including a San Diego County woman who took the company to trial. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed. The settlement with Ruth Barillas, a 54-year-old former bank clerk from La Mesa, came hours before a 12-person Orange County Superior Court was scheduled to begin deliberations in the 5-week-old trial.
NEWS
September 2, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heart valve manufacturer Shiley Inc., defending itself against accusations that it lied to federal regulators, struck an eleventh-hour settlement late Wednesday with 259 heart valve recipients, including the San Diego County woman who took the company to trial. Terms of the agreement were not disclosed.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Attorneys for a woman suing the maker of a potentially defective artificial heart valve said late Tuesday--just hours before the jury was set to begin deliberations--that they were working on a last-minute, out-of-court settlement. Officials of Shiley Inc., however, denied that a settlement was imminent. Lawyers for Ruth Barillas, 54, of La Mesa in San Diego County, have accused Irvine-based Shiley Inc. and its parent company, Pfizer Inc.
BUSINESS
March 13, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shiley Inc. Wins Round in Court: The state Supreme Court has ordered a panel to review a decision that allows out-of-state recipients of a potentially defective heart valve to sue the device's Irvine-based manufacturer in California. About 130 out-of-state recipients who have valves that have not malfunctioned are pursuing legal action because of their fear that the devices will do so. About 300 people have died when the struts in the valves have come apart. Valve manufacturer Shiley Inc.
BUSINESS
August 31, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three former employees at Shiley Inc., the onetime Irvine medical device manufacturer, said the company recycled thousands of poorly manufactured artificial heart valves--and altered their serial numbers--to save money. "After Pfizer took over the company (in 1979), things changed and it seemed that the company's efforts were concentrated strictly on more production and not quality control," wrote former Shiley welder Wayne Runnells in a November, 1990, affidavit obtained by The Times.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|