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ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1997
Reading your article on "corporate messages" at PBS had me checking my calendar to make sure it wasn't 1984 ("Soft Commercials Air on KCET in a 'Test' for Funding," Dec. 28). Newspeak is apparently alive and well in, of all places, the hallowed halls of public broadcasting. Perhaps a less hypocritical alternative would be a new channel that provides all the programming we now see on PBS without the constant shilling for money, the "corporate messages" and the self-congratulatory promos.
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BUSINESS
October 31, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
Celebrity spokesdoctor Dr. Mehmet Oz has pushed back against our post this week questioning why he appeared in a promotional ad for the National Football League , given the league's dubious record on head injuries. We asked whether it wasn't irresponsible of America's most prominent medical authority to promote schoolboy football -- he used his own son as an example -- without at least warning parents of evidence that the sport can produce lasting medical consequences. The post also included the explanation he gave us that he made the spot to convey  "the role the game played in my personal ... development" and "the same value in the game as a teaching tool for our son. "   In an interview with AdvertisingAge published Thursday, Dr. Oz expanded on those assertions and answered some of our other points.
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OPINION
November 13, 2010
Unclear on U.S. exceptionalism Re "America, the one and only," Opinion, Nov. 9 Like Jonah Goldberg and President Obama, I think the United States is a great country. It was great before we abolished slavery; it was greater afterward. What did conservatives think of that? It was great before women had the right to vote; it was greater afterward. What did conservatives think of that? It was great before workers had the right to join unions; it was greater afterward.
HEALTH
September 25, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
A poem by Charles Bukowski is featured in an advertisement for Dewar's, the 157-year-old blended scotch. If only the notoriously hard-drinking poet had lived long enough to reap the rewards of his endorsement. The L.A. poet died in 1994 at age 73, having lived long enough to go from being an antihero of the underground to being celebrated internationally for his writing. His life was fictionalized in the film " Barfly ," and his papers are now in the collection at the highbrow Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino.
NEWS
October 8, 1987 | DON ALPERT
Question: I have two sets of coins that were struck to commemorate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II in 1953. There's a separate silver 5-shilling piece with a figure of the queen on horseback and emblems of England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland on the other side. The words "Faith and Truth I will bear unto you" are engraved around the side.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2009 | Erik Himmelsbach
Self-mythologizing is as much a part of rock as the 15-minute guitar solo. Tom Waits knows the drill: He's been messing with our heads for a full generation. Like Bob Dylan, he has proven a canny master of disguise, creating an impenetrable wall to keep his life from a discerning public. But more like David Bowie than Dylan, Waits has utilized exaggerated theatricality as his mask of choice. He emerged in 1971 as a flophouse poet and beat-influenced boozer. When that conceptual well ran dry, he became a sonic junk man, a cockeyed carnival barker shilling opaque shards of sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2004 | Carina Chocano
Former President Clinton slogged through the talk show circuit this week promoting his 957-page autobiography, "My Life." Along the way, he encountered diffident anchors, indulgent hosts and uncompromising journalists who made him squirm before moving on to Mary-Kate Olsen's eating disorder. For his part, Clinton mostly kept his temper and stuck dutifully, if often verbatim, to his talking points. Show: 60 Minutes As seen on TV: With Dan Rather Airdate: Last Sunday, 7 p.m. The vibe: Man-to-Dan.
OPINION
October 11, 2009
California's Republican state senators claim they act the way they do -- blocking budget votes, demanding health and education cuts, opening tax loopholes for downtrodden classes such as yacht owners -- because they want to protect their constituents from overbearing and ineffective government. They're becoming progressively less believable, especially after GOP senators last month held more than 20 mostly worthy bills hostage in order to try killing a program that old-school Republicans would have championed.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
The shilling sank to an official record low against the U.S. dollar, extending a slide that began when the International Monetary Fund halted a key aid package last week. The IMF had cited the government's failure to crack down on corruption in its decision. The shilling fell 4% to close at 70.26 to the dollar. It has fallen 18% since the IMF took action. The government, meanwhile, declared illegal a national strike called for today, raising chances of violent clashes.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | Associated Press
The ancient shilling is history. The so-called "one bob," a coin of the realm since 1504, ceased to be legal tender Tuesday and was replaced by a smaller 5-pence coin. Shillings--roughly the diameter of a quarter and unchanged in size since 1816--can be returned to banks for several months. The government says it has retrieved 800 million shillings, leaving more than 4 billion still in circulation. The new 5-pence coin, about the size of a dime, is worth 9 1/2 cents.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
Herbalife International says it's all about helping people "pursue healthy, active lives. " UCLA's Geffen School of Medicine likes to think of itself as being in the forefront of medical research and modern healthcare. But the curious relationship between these two supposed champions of healthful living should turn your stomach. Herbalife is the Los Angeles nutritional supplement firm that has become the centerpiece of a ferocious Wall Street tug of war. The major player is hedge fund manager Bill Ackman, who contends that Herbalife is a scam to sell overpriced products by fooling people into becoming Herbalife "distributors" by implying the business will make them rich.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2011 | By Roger Vincent, Los Angeles Times
Prominent Los Angeles property brokerage Ramsey-Shilling Commercial Real Estate Services Inc. has been bought by Avison Young, Canada's largest independent commercial real estate services company. Avison Young plans to acquire more Southern California brokerages and other real estate companies in the U.S. in the months ahead, Managing Director Neil Resnick said. Resnick, a broker formerly with Grubb & Ellis, opened Avison Young's first Los Angeles office in August. The acquisition of Ramsey-Shilling for an undisclosed amount added 23 employees, including 18 brokers, to Avison Young.
OPINION
November 13, 2010
Unclear on U.S. exceptionalism Re "America, the one and only," Opinion, Nov. 9 Like Jonah Goldberg and President Obama, I think the United States is a great country. It was great before we abolished slavery; it was greater afterward. What did conservatives think of that? It was great before women had the right to vote; it was greater afterward. What did conservatives think of that? It was great before workers had the right to join unions; it was greater afterward.
OPINION
October 11, 2009
California's Republican state senators claim they act the way they do -- blocking budget votes, demanding health and education cuts, opening tax loopholes for downtrodden classes such as yacht owners -- because they want to protect their constituents from overbearing and ineffective government. They're becoming progressively less believable, especially after GOP senators last month held more than 20 mostly worthy bills hostage in order to try killing a program that old-school Republicans would have championed.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 2009 | Erik Himmelsbach
Self-mythologizing is as much a part of rock as the 15-minute guitar solo. Tom Waits knows the drill: He's been messing with our heads for a full generation. Like Bob Dylan, he has proven a canny master of disguise, creating an impenetrable wall to keep his life from a discerning public. But more like David Bowie than Dylan, Waits has utilized exaggerated theatricality as his mask of choice. He emerged in 1971 as a flophouse poet and beat-influenced boozer. When that conceptual well ran dry, he became a sonic junk man, a cockeyed carnival barker shilling opaque shards of sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 2008 | Chris Lee
Is Ben Lyons the most hated film critic in America? In the four months since the fresh-faced 27-year-old "movie dude" for the E! Entertainment Network was installed to co-host a revamped version of the venerable movie review program "At the Movies," he has gotten a resounding thumbs down from an angry mob of film bloggers, columnists, professional movie critics and fans of the show.
SPORTS
May 12, 2007 | Chris Foster, Times Staff Writer
The Boston Red Sox will have a bountiful June at the ticket window. Pitcher Curt Schilling is seeing to that. Expanding his duties beyond the white lines, Schilling seems to be living up to the first syllable of his name, taking it upon himself to boost ticket sales. Roger Clemens signs with the Yankees. Schilling responds in his blog, "I could care less now," and points out, "It would have been nice to have him, but we didn't need him, we don't need him."
BUSINESS
January 9, 2007 | Roger Vincent
Mark Evanoff has been appointed president and chief operating officer of Ramsey-Shilling Commercial Real Estate Services, the Los Angeles firm's board of directors announced. Evanoff, 51, has held several posts at the firm, which is active in Hollywood, Burbank, Glendale and Pasadena. He replaces Michael Nesson, who left for a position in the biotech industry. Christopher Bonbright remains chief executive. * -- Roger Vincent
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2008 | John Horn, Times Staff Writer
If YOUR kids simply must watch the Cartoon Network, they will be overwhelmed with ads for all kinds of tooth-rotting junk, including Pop Tarts, Lucky Charms, Reese's Puffs and some concoction called Froot Loops Cereal Straws. But critics say there's a different pediatric health risk on the cable channel -- promotions tied to violent, PG-13-rated movies. The ultimate financial success for almost all summer films, especially those rated PG-13, is determined by young ticket buyers.
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