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AUTOS
December 19, 2007 | SUSAN CARPENTER
Oh, %*$#@! That was pretty much the soundtrack to my daily commute on the iZip Express electric bicycle. The bike wasn't the reason I was swearing like a deranged baseball manager. It was the rush-hour traffic. Otherwise, this 750-watt, battery-assisted pedal pusher did exactly what it's designed to do. It got me out of my car and into a cost-effective, eco-friendly commuter vehicle, and it did it without making me sweat like a sumo wrestler. The iZip Express is a true hybrid.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
I've logged a lot of time on motorcycles, and a lot of time on mountain bikes. So I approached my first "electric bicycle" with the same skepticism that I employed in the minutes before I sat on my first electric motorcycle. That lasted 30 seconds into my first ride, by which time I was a convert. The instrument of my bicycle conversion was an electric Shima, from the German manufacturer A2B. It was followed up by a similar revelation astride A2B's Alva+. The Shima and Alva+ did for me what performance enhancing drugs did for Lance Armstrong.
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BUSINESS
December 13, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
I've logged a lot of time on motorcycles, and a lot of time on mountain bikes. So I approached my first "electric bicycle" with the same skepticism that I employed in the minutes before I sat on my first electric motorcycle. That lasted 30 seconds into my first ride, by which time I was a convert. The instrument of my bicycle conversion was an electric Shima, from the German manufacturer A2B. It was followed up by a similar revelation astride A2B's Alva+. The Shima and Alva+ did for me what performance enhancing drugs did for Lance Armstrong.
AUTOS
December 19, 2007 | SUSAN CARPENTER
Oh, %*$#@! That was pretty much the soundtrack to my daily commute on the iZip Express electric bicycle. The bike wasn't the reason I was swearing like a deranged baseball manager. It was the rush-hour traffic. Otherwise, this 750-watt, battery-assisted pedal pusher did exactly what it's designed to do. It got me out of my car and into a cost-effective, eco-friendly commuter vehicle, and it did it without making me sweat like a sumo wrestler. The iZip Express is a true hybrid.
SPORTS
August 13, 2001 | Chris Dufresne
We have subtitled today's column "What they really meant" to honor the countless sporting quotes over the years that have been nothing more than Cincinnati Red herrings. One reason sportswriters are cynical is because we are fed lies in packs and get spun more often than Shimano reels. In turn, we pass these shams and half-truths to you, the consumer.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1987 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Shimano American Corp., the U.S. subsidiary of a leading Japanese manufacturer of bicycle parts and fishing rods and reels, has consolidated its U.S operations in a new 125,000-square-foot corporate headquarters, warehouse and distribution facility in Irvine. In the consolidation, the company has closed its former headquarters in Parsippany, N.J., and shut down a sales and warehouse facility in Chatsworth.
NEWS
July 12, 2005 | Paul Whitefield
"Convenient design. Fits in your glove compartment. Attaches to your belt. Contained in the handle are: hook, line, sinker and bobber.... It's the best gift you can give to any kid or adult." That's the longtime pitch for the Pocket Fisherman, a sort of retro-cool mini pole for the not-so-serious fisherman. Sure, it's plastic and small -- about 10 inches folded, 18 inches unfolded -- and its shape bears a disturbing resemblance to the electric carving knife dad got for Christmas in the 1970s.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury, ruling that the world's leading maker of bicycle parts priced products below cost to destroy competition, has ordered Japan-based Shimano Inc. and its U.S. subsidiary in Irvine to pay about $9 million in damages. The jury reached its verdict Monday in Santa Ana, capping a four-year legal dispute that pitted Shimano against a much smaller competitor, Chicago-based Sram Corp. Shimano said it will appeal. Sram contended that Shimano and its U.S. unit, Shimano America Corp.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sports equipment giant Shimano American Corp. will pay a $150,000 fine to settle allegations that it failed to report defects in bicycle cranks soon enough, federal regulators said Wednesday. Shimano, the Irvine-based subsidiary of Japan's Shimano Inc., recalled 2.5 million bike cranks in July 1997, including 1 million in North America.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1997 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is being called the bicycle industry's largest-ever safety action, Shimano American Corp. and its Japanese parent company said Wednesday that they are recalling more than 2.5 million bicycle cranks installed on two-wheelers worldwide. The voluntary recall, prompted by reports of rider injuries from broken cranks, includes 1 million bicycles in North America, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which will monitor those returns.
NEWS
July 12, 2005 | Paul Whitefield
"Convenient design. Fits in your glove compartment. Attaches to your belt. Contained in the handle are: hook, line, sinker and bobber.... It's the best gift you can give to any kid or adult." That's the longtime pitch for the Pocket Fisherman, a sort of retro-cool mini pole for the not-so-serious fisherman. Sure, it's plastic and small -- about 10 inches folded, 18 inches unfolded -- and its shape bears a disturbing resemblance to the electric carving knife dad got for Christmas in the 1970s.
SPORTS
August 13, 2001 | Chris Dufresne
We have subtitled today's column "What they really meant" to honor the countless sporting quotes over the years that have been nothing more than Cincinnati Red herrings. One reason sportswriters are cynical is because we are fed lies in packs and get spun more often than Shimano reels. In turn, we pass these shams and half-truths to you, the consumer.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury, ruling that the world's leading maker of bicycle parts priced products below cost to destroy competition, has ordered Japan-based Shimano Inc. and its U.S. subsidiary in Irvine to pay about $9 million in damages. The jury reached its verdict Monday in Santa Ana, capping a four-year legal dispute that pitted Shimano against a much smaller competitor, Chicago-based Sram Corp. Shimano said it will appeal. Sram contended that Shimano and its U.S. unit, Shimano America Corp.
BUSINESS
July 8, 1999 | ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sports equipment giant Shimano American Corp. will pay a $150,000 fine to settle allegations that it failed to report defects in bicycle cranks soon enough, federal regulators said Wednesday. Shimano, the Irvine-based subsidiary of Japan's Shimano Inc., recalled 2.5 million bike cranks in July 1997, including 1 million in North America.
BUSINESS
July 10, 1997 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what is being called the bicycle industry's largest-ever safety action, Shimano American Corp. and its Japanese parent company said Wednesday that they are recalling more than 2.5 million bicycle cranks installed on two-wheelers worldwide. The voluntary recall, prompted by reports of rider injuries from broken cranks, includes 1 million bicycles in North America, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, which will monitor those returns.
BUSINESS
January 13, 1987 | LESLIE BERKMAN, Times Staff Writer
Shimano American Corp., the U.S. subsidiary of a leading Japanese manufacturer of bicycle parts and fishing rods and reels, has consolidated its U.S operations in a new 125,000-square-foot corporate headquarters, warehouse and distribution facility in Irvine. In the consolidation, the company has closed its former headquarters in Parsippany, N.J., and shut down a sales and warehouse facility in Chatsworth.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2009 | Alison Bell
A plaque near the entrance on the sprawling grounds of the Santa Anita racetrack is the sole reminder of the track's place in World War II history as the nation's largest assembly center for Japanese Americans on their way to internment camps. Although the prestigious Breeders' Cup World Championships unfolded Friday and Saturday at the landmark racetrack, 67 years ago a darker chapter unfolded at the site. The horses were moved out, the track was shut down and the park's extensive grounds provided the massive space needed by the War Department to temporarily house thousands of people of Japanese decent.
BUSINESS
December 15, 1999 | LESLIE EARNEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal jury, ruling that the world's leading maker of bicycle parts priced products below cost to destroy competition, has ordered Japan-based Shimano Inc. and its U.S. subsidiary in Irvine to pay about $9 million in damages. The jury reached its verdict Monday in Santa Ana, capping a four-year legal dispute that pitted Shimano against a much smaller competitor, Chicago-based Sram Corp. Shimano said it will appeal. Sram contended that Shimano and its U.S. unit, Shimano America Corp.
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