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Shin Kanemaru

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NEWS
March 28, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Shin Kanemaru, for years one of Japan's most powerful politicians and later at the center of one of its biggest corruption scandals, died today. He was 81. Kanemaru died at a hospital in his hometown in the central Japanese prefecture of Yamanashi, according to a Liberal Democratic Party official. Media reports said he died after a stroke. It quoted family members as saying Kanemaru was well until Wednesday.
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NEWS
March 28, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Shin Kanemaru, for years one of Japan's most powerful politicians and later at the center of one of its biggest corruption scandals, died today. He was 81. Kanemaru died at a hospital in his hometown in the central Japanese prefecture of Yamanashi, according to a Liberal Democratic Party official. Media reports said he died after a stroke. It quoted family members as saying Kanemaru was well until Wednesday.
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MAGAZINE
August 9, 1992 | JEFF SHEAR, Jeff Shear is a Washington-based writer who is working on a book about the FSX fighter deal with Japan. It will be published in fall, 1993, by St. Martin's Press.
LAST MARCH, IN A PREFECTURE NORTH OF TOKYO, A GUNMAN CHARGED OUT of the audience just as the aged politician the Japanese call "the shadow shogun" finished his speech. Security men assumed he was a photographer hurrying past. He opened fire within 15 feet of his target. Three rapid shots rang out.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shin Kanemaru, once the most powerful figure in Japanese politics, pleaded not guilty Thursday to tax evasion in the start of a spectacular trial that could further rock Japan's political world and expose the corrupt ties between politicians and the construction industry. He is charged with evading nearly $10 million in taxes on $17 million of unreported income.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | Reuters
Japanese prosecutors, slammed for their lenient treatment of top politician Shin Kanemaru, have apparently decided to reopen the inquiry into his role in a gangster-linked money scandal, Asahi Shimbun reported today. Kanemaru was the powerful "kingmaker" of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) until he resigned from Parliament this week in disgrace.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Call for Cut in Interest Rates Rejected: Some members of the Japanese parliament from the ruling party called for another cut in interest rates last week, and prominent party member Shin Kanemaru publicly endorsed a half-point cut, but Bank of Japan Gov. Yasushi Mieno rejected the idea. Mieno insisted that there is no sharp economic downturn in sight and no need to stimulate the economy.
NEWS
September 26, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shin Kanemaru, the ruling party kingpin, submitted a written admission of guilt on Friday that will let prosecutors impose a summary conviction against him and fine him up to $1,600 for receiving a $4.1-million donation in violation of Japan's political contributions law. The conviction will be the first time that any politician has been found guilty of violating the law, which forbids politicians to take any single donation exceeding $12,200.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa pledged Wednesday to "take the lead in carrying out political reform," but his statement failed to quiet the widening uproar over Japan's latest scandal. Although Shin Kanemaru, Japan's political kingpin, announced that he was ending a 38-year career, new demands arose for the resignation of yet another ruling Liberal Democratic Party powerbroker.
NEWS
October 14, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under rising criticism for associating with gangsters and receiving only a slap on the wrist for accepting an illegal $4.1-million political donation, Shin Kanemaru resigned his Parliament seat today, ending a 38-year career that made him the kingpin of Japanese politics. The parliamentary resignation of Kanemaru, 78, also marked the end of his stewardship of the 111-member dominant faction of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing an unprecedented drive against a political kingpin, prosecutors Saturday indicted the man credited with picking three of Japan's last four prime ministers on tax-evasion charges that could subject him to $18.3 million in fines if convicted.
NEWS
May 2, 1993 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A shadow looms behind the tranquillity of the Riviera Country Club, the historic golf course that sprawls across a verdant bluff overlooking the ocean in Pacific Palisades: The club's Japanese owners are suspected of laundering money tainted by corruption back home. U.S.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Climaxing an unprecedented drive against a political kingpin, prosecutors Saturday indicted the man credited with picking three of Japan's last four prime ministers on tax-evasion charges that could subject him to $18.3 million in fines if convicted.
NEWS
March 14, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shin Kanemaru, the fallen kingmaker who once anointed prime ministers and manipulated the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, was indicted Saturday on charges of evading $1 million in taxes on $1.7 million of concealed income. Kanemaru, 78, faces further indictments in connection with an additional $5.1 million in concealed income, but Tokyo prosecutors filed only partial charges in order to beat Saturday's deadline for the statute of limitations on his 1987-related activity.
NEWS
March 10, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jolt after jolt, shock after shock, the seamy accounts of Shin Kanemaru's corruption keep surfacing: Reports Tuesday that Japan's onetime political kingmaker stashed away hundreds of pounds of gold, cash and bonds totaling as much as $50 million were eclipsed by reports today that his son had hidden a safe filled with another $34 million in loot. The first cache of gold was seized by prosecutors as Kanemaru aides tried to relocate it, apparently to evade authorities.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shin Kanemaru, once the most powerful man in Japanese politics before resigning in disgrace last year in a corruption scandal, was arrested and jailed Saturday on charges of evading hundreds of thousands of dollars in income taxes. Kanemaru's secretary, Masahisa Haibara, was also arrested on charges that could send the onetime political kingmaker and his aide to jail for up to five years, the Tokyo District Public Prosecutor's Office announced.
NEWS
October 17, 1992 | Reuters
Japanese prosecutors, slammed for their lenient treatment of top politician Shin Kanemaru, have apparently decided to reopen the inquiry into his role in a gangster-linked money scandal, Asahi Shimbun reported today. Kanemaru was the powerful "kingmaker" of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) until he resigned from Parliament this week in disgrace.
NEWS
July 23, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shin Kanemaru, once the most powerful figure in Japanese politics, pleaded not guilty Thursday to tax evasion in the start of a spectacular trial that could further rock Japan's political world and expose the corrupt ties between politicians and the construction industry. He is charged with evading nearly $10 million in taxes on $17 million of unreported income.
NEWS
March 7, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shin Kanemaru, once the most powerful man in Japanese politics before resigning in disgrace last year in a corruption scandal, was arrested and jailed Saturday on charges of evading hundreds of thousands of dollars in income taxes. Kanemaru's secretary, Masahisa Haibara, was also arrested on charges that could send the onetime political kingmaker and his aide to jail for up to five years, the Tokyo District Public Prosecutor's Office announced.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa pledged Wednesday to "take the lead in carrying out political reform," but his statement failed to quiet the widening uproar over Japan's latest scandal. Although Shin Kanemaru, Japan's political kingpin, announced that he was ending a 38-year career, new demands arose for the resignation of yet another ruling Liberal Democratic Party powerbroker.
NEWS
October 15, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first, it looked like just another political scandal in what seems to be a never-ending saga of corruption in Japan. The nation's most powerful politician admitted publicly in August that he had taken $4.1 million in illegal campaign contributions from a business with links to gangsters.
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