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Shine Movie

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1996 | Bruce Newman, Bruce Newman is an occasional contributor to Calendar
David says: Yes, got to stop talking, got to stop, got to stop, it's a problem isn't it? Is it a problem? It's all right David; just tell Sylvia why you're here. Ahhhh! Well it's a mystery, a mystery, a mystery-- Are you lost? Am I lost? Perhaps that's it. I'm lost, I'm lost, I'm lost. How does that sound?
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some summer movie seasons are front-loaded, with all the big-ticket movies debuting before Memorial Day. Some are back-loaded to take advantage of the period from late June through August, when kids are out of school and adults are on vacation. This year it's both. Films such as "The Mummy Returns" and "Pearl Harbor" will kick off the lucrative season in May.
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NEWS
March 5, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He raced onto the stage with no introduction, because after the movie "Shine," David Helfgott needed none. So familiar was the story of the troubled Australian pianist, in fact, that many among the sold-out crowd that packed Symphony Hall for the debut concert of his North American tour Tuesday night said they felt as if they knew him personally. "I've seen the movie five times," said Gary Burnham, a labor union official from South Boston.
NEWS
March 5, 1997 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He raced onto the stage with no introduction, because after the movie "Shine," David Helfgott needed none. So familiar was the story of the troubled Australian pianist, in fact, that many among the sold-out crowd that packed Symphony Hall for the debut concert of his North American tour Tuesday night said they felt as if they knew him personally. "I've seen the movie five times," said Gary Burnham, a labor union official from South Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1997 | STEPHEN WIGLER, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The movie "Shine" has created a phenomenon that suggests a new low in standards for classical music--something to which I am no doubt contributing by writing about the film for the second time in two weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1987 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Amos Manuel has spent more than four decades stooped at people's feet, smearing shoe polish with hands as black and rough as emery, and buffing it in quick, rhythmic strokes that say he has done one thing most of his life: shoeshine man. One fine January day in the twilight of Manuel's life, fortune called. Cinewest, a production company, asked to use Amos' Shoeshine for a few scenes in "Break of Dawn," a film being shot in San Diego. He agreed, and was offered a bit part.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | RICHARD NATALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Some summer movie seasons are front-loaded, with all the big-ticket movies debuting before Memorial Day. Some are back-loaded to take advantage of the period from late June through August, when kids are out of school and adults are on vacation. This year it's both. Films such as "The Mummy Returns" and "Pearl Harbor" will kick off the lucrative season in May.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1997
Bravo! to The Times' Mark Swed and fellow music critics who have the courage to expose the "Shine" recital tour for the cynical exploitation that it is ("The Reality of 'Shine': An Image Distorted," March 22). The critics are doing their job, harsh as they may be. "Shine" (the movie) is an extraordinary film about the human spirit. That it is based on a true story is incidental to its power as a work of art, just as the musical ability of pianist David Helfgott is incidental to his brave struggle to overcome a devastating mental illness.
OPINION
November 2, 1997 | MOSHE ADLER, Moshe Adler is an associate professor of economics at the Graduate School of Management, Rutgers University
What is lost in the current debate about the National Endowment for the Arts and tax-supported funding in general for the arts is the fact that not just path-breaking, public-alienating artists go hungry these days. Many first-rate artists whose work probably wouldn't offend a soul--and whose talent is just as great as that of the stars of their field--also have to give up their art for lack of patronage. Why are so many artists unable to find work or, if they do, at only meager wages?
BUSINESS
March 4, 1997 | CLAUDIA ELLER
Australian producer Jane Scott still has the "hit list" of 39 movie companies, agents, distributors and other potential investors that turned her down in the pursuit of financing for a modestly budgeted movie nobody wanted to make. None of the industry's leading independents who pride themselves on offbeat fare, including Miramax, Fine Line, Samuel Goldwyn Co. and Sony Classics, were willing to take a risk on making the $4.5-million "Shine."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 1997 | STEPHEN WIGLER, THE BALTIMORE SUN
The movie "Shine" has created a phenomenon that suggests a new low in standards for classical music--something to which I am no doubt contributing by writing about the film for the second time in two weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1996 | Ron Banks, Ron Banks is arts editor of the West Australian
Meeting David Helfgott is an intriguing experience for those unaware of his need for tactile expression. Everyone he encounters is hugged and kissed, and there is much hand-holding and even attempts at cuddling. When I meet him in the office of my newspaper, the West Australian in Perth--a city of 1.2 million on the western coast of Australia, where Helfgott grew up--he immediately kisses me on both cheeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1987 | LEONARD BERNSTEIN, Times Staff Writer
Amos Manuel has spent more than four decades stooped at people's feet, smearing shoe polish with hands as black and rough as emery, and buffing it in quick, rhythmic strokes that say he has done one thing most of his life: shoeshine man. One fine January day in the twilight of Manuel's life, fortune called. Cinewest, a production company, asked to use Amos' Shoeshine for a few scenes in "Break of Dawn," a film being shot in San Diego. He agreed, and was offered a bit part.
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