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March 18, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
If the old distinctions between reggae, rap and pop are tumbling down, you can give a lot of the credit to Shinehead. The reggae/rap vocalist, who was born in Jamaica and has lived in New York since 1976, created a stir last year with his category-defying "Unity" album, which blended the Beatles' "Come Together" with snippets of "We Shall Overcome," Bob Marley and Sam Cooke, and radically revamped contemporary reggae hits and old soul material.
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NEWS
November 29, 1990 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not exactly like "Stinky" or "Fatso," but reggae/rap artist Carl Aiken, who perhaps shares barbers with Sinead O'Connor, has an alias he would rather do without, or so he says. So is he Carl or Shinehead? His record company, Elektra, says he prefers the latter. But more on that later. Shinehead was born in London and raised in Jamaica but has lived in New York City since 1976. So his eclectic set of influences is understandable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
If the Greek was an indoor theater, Shinehead's opening reggae-rap-rock salvo "Unity" would have torn the roof off at Saturday's "Reggae Sunsplash" concert. The lanky New Yorker electrified the crowd's spirit of amiable anarchy by strolling through the audience (unescorted by security guards) during a sparkling set that again confirmed his enormous potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
Shinehead's 1988 debut album "Unity" placed the Jamaican-born, New York City-bred reggae rapper in the forefront of reggae's new generation and established him as one of the freshest young artists in any genre. His pastiches blended a wide array of sources and stances without slipping into forced eclecticism. "The Real Rock" is a mystifying follow-up because Shinehead has abandoned the panoramic sweep for a one-dimensional, electronic reggae/rap groove.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Too bad only 100 people showed up at the John Anson Ford Theatre on Saturday afternoon, because a Jamaican-born, New York-bred toaster/rapper who goes by the name of Shinehead served notice that his brand of reggae spiced with rap is a future force to be reckoned with.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's not exactly like "Stinky" or "Fatso," but reggae/rap artist Carl Aiken, who perhaps shares barbers with Sinead O'Connor, has an alias he would rather do without, or so he says. So is he Carl or Shinehead? His record company, Elektra, says he prefers the latter. But more on that later. Shinehead was born in London and raised in Jamaica but has lived in New York City since 1976. So his eclectic set of influences is understandable.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
Shinehead's 1988 debut album "Unity" placed the Jamaican-born, New York City-bred reggae rapper in the forefront of reggae's new generation and established him as one of the freshest young artists in any genre. His pastiches blended a wide array of sources and stances without slipping into forced eclecticism. "The Real Rock" is a mystifying follow-up because Shinehead has abandoned the panoramic sweep for a one-dimensional, electronic reggae/rap groove.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN
This year's Reggae Sunsplash festival tour could be subtitled "One Old Dog and Some New Tricks." And though reggae has long been in dire need of some new tricks, when Sunsplash opened its three-day stay at the Greek Theatre on Friday it was the old dog--Jamaican singer Dennis Brown--who with the most traditional set gave the best performance. Brown isn't actually that old, but having started as a reggae prodigy more than two decades ago, he has developed a masterful command of the style.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This year's Reggae Sunsplash festival tour, which comesto the Pacific Amphitheatre in Costa Mesa Sunday, could be subtitled "One Old Dog and Some New Tricks." And though reggae has long been in dire need of some new tricks, when Sunsplash opened its three-day stay at the Greek Theatre on Friday it was the old dog--Jamaican singer Dennis Brown--who with the most traditional set gave the best performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
If the Greek was an indoor theater, Shinehead's opening reggae-rap-rock salvo "Unity" would have torn the roof off at Saturday's "Reggae Sunsplash" concert. The lanky New Yorker electrified the crowd's spirit of amiable anarchy by strolling through the audience (unescorted by security guards) during a sparkling set that again confirmed his enormous potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1989 | DON SNOWDEN
If the old distinctions between reggae, rap and pop are tumbling down, you can give a lot of the credit to Shinehead. The reggae/rap vocalist, who was born in Jamaica and has lived in New York since 1976, created a stir last year with his category-defying "Unity" album, which blended the Beatles' "Come Together" with snippets of "We Shall Overcome," Bob Marley and Sam Cooke, and radically revamped contemporary reggae hits and old soul material.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
Too bad only 100 people showed up at the John Anson Ford Theatre on Saturday afternoon, because a Jamaican-born, New York-bred toaster/rapper who goes by the name of Shinehead served notice that his brand of reggae spiced with rap is a future force to be reckoned with.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 1989 | Robert Hilburn
Anita Baker, whose latest Elektra album spent a month at No. 1 on the Billboard magazine charts and who is widely hailed as one of the most gifted singers of the '80s. Tracy Chapman, whose debut album has sold more than 2 million copies in the United States and earned her six Grammy nominations. Metallica, the critically acclaimed metal band whose Elektra album ". . . And Justice for All" has gone platinum (1 million copies) and brought new standing to the can't-get-no-respect heavy-metal genre.
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