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Shingles Disease

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NEWS
August 19, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers are on the brink of perfecting a vaccine that may prevent shingles--a disease that most often afflicts the elderly and can produce blisters so painful that it has driven some to suicide. The last phase of research, launched in June, could produce a marketable vaccine within five years--just in time for the first wave of baby boomers entering their 60s.
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NEWS
August 19, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Researchers are on the brink of perfecting a vaccine that may prevent shingles--a disease that most often afflicts the elderly and can produce blisters so painful that it has driven some to suicide. The last phase of research, launched in June, could produce a marketable vaccine within five years--just in time for the first wave of baby boomers entering their 60s.
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BOOKS
June 3, 1990 | KAREN STABINER
Thanks to an odd (and, for the author, unfortunate) set of circumstances, there now exists a refreshingly clear and accessible book on a subject few of us think about: shingles, a disease that, according to Thomas Thomsen, will afflict one in five people in the course of a 70-year lifetime. To Thomsen's bad luck, he came down with the painful disorder, a virus related to chicken pox, in 1986. The other 1.2 million people who suffer an attack every year will benefit from his suffering.
HEALTH
May 3, 2004 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Before the introduction of a vaccine to prevent chickenpox, the fever, blistering rash and severe itching associated with the disease were considered a childhood rite of passage. Although the symptoms generally faded quickly, the potential consequences for those who had this infection extend well into adulthood. The virus responsible for chickenpox -- varicella-zoster -- doesn't disappear when the blisters heal.
SPORTS
March 10, 2005 | Bill Dwyre, Times Staff Writer
It was not as if Robby Ginepri had expected to see anything like this in his athletic career. He is, after all, a tennis player, not a boxer or race driver, where life-threatening situations are part of the sport. But there, on a dreary, drizzly day in Rome last May, was his friend, James Blake, not moving and face down on a clay court where they had been practicing. "I knew it was bad," Ginepri said recently. "I was shocked." Each had lost in the first round of the Italian Open.
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