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Shinichi Suzuki

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shinichi Suzuki, who pioneered a method for teaching toddlers to play musical instruments the same way they learn to speak--through imitation and constant repetition--died Monday. He was 99. Suzuki, whose approach popularized musical instruction for the very young, died of heart failure at his home in Matsumoto in central Japan, said Hiroko Yamada of Suzuki's Talent Education Research Institute.
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February 28, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
It's no surprise that a conversation with Alice Schoenfeld would go deep into the traditions and legacies of classical music. She has been teaching the violin at USC's Thornton School of Music since 1960, having played her first recital more than 30 years earlier, at age 5. What's astonishing, as one sits in the large studio of her home in La Canada Flintridge, listening to her talk about her life in music in a clear, lilting, German-accented speaking...
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February 28, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
It's no surprise that a conversation with Alice Schoenfeld would go deep into the traditions and legacies of classical music. She has been teaching the violin at USC's Thornton School of Music since 1960, having played her first recital more than 30 years earlier, at age 5. What's astonishing, as one sits in the large studio of her home in La Canada Flintridge, listening to her talk about her life in music in a clear, lilting, German-accented speaking...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shinichi Suzuki, who pioneered a method for teaching toddlers to play musical instruments the same way they learn to speak--through imitation and constant repetition--died Monday. He was 99. Suzuki, whose approach popularized musical instruction for the very young, died of heart failure at his home in Matsumoto in central Japan, said Hiroko Yamada of Suzuki's Talent Education Research Institute.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1992
Re "World-Class Welcome Home for Ozawa" (Sept. 7): Readers need to be informed of the facts, which Teresa Watanabe's article does not do. Watanabe conveys that Seiji Ozawa returned to Japan for the first time in 30 years. She also stresses that this is the first "world-class classical music festival" in Japan. First, Ozawa has been music director and conductor of the New Japan Philharmonic Orchestra in Tokyo since 1972. He has been a national hero for decades, which is why he has both the corporate support to start the Saito Kinen Orchestra and the admiration of the Empress of Japan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1996 | YVONNE MILOSEVIC, Special to The Times
Back in the 1930s, Dr. Shinichi Suzuki had an idea. Students could learn music, he suggested, just the way children learn to speak, by listening and imitating those around them. Today, his method is known around the world, and children barely old enough to steer tricycles work with pint-sized violins to make some beautiful music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2002 | Janet Wilson, Times Staff Writer
All the children were above average in Newport Beach on Sunday. Perfect, in fact, to their adoring audience. Three hundred and nine violins, cellos and violas strong, they bowed and plucked in the afternoon sunlight, sending ribbon candies of sound through the big auditorium at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Ages 6 to 17, they arrived in their parents' SUVs and sedans from across Orange County for the 32nd Suzuki Festival Concert.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, Corinne Flocken is a free-lance writer who regularly covers Kid Stuff for The Times Orange County Edition.
Take a child barely out of diapers, plunk him down in front of a piano and watch those little hands fly. Granted, the tune may sound more like coins in the Cuisinart than Beethoven's Fifth. But to his ears, it's fine music. Merle Valdez understands that. Director of the Merle Valdez Studio of Music since the mid-1950s, she has spent her career channeling youthful passion into a lifelong appreciation of music.
FOOD
September 29, 1994 | MICHELLE HUNEVEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On special occasions, my family ate at Robaire's on La Brea. For us, dining out was a luxury, and while we ate dinner once a week at a family restaurant in Altadena and often started camping trips with coffee-shop eggs, we followed a strict restaurant protocol.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 1989 | KENNETH HERMAN
La Jolla's Sherwood Auditorium, which usually plays host to chamber music and an occasional visit from the UC San Diego avant-gardists, will take on a decidedly Oriental cast on the afternoon of June 25. Members of Masazumi Kai, a local organization devoted to teaching and performing Japanese traditional music, will present koto master Shinichi Yuize and Yasuko Nakashima in concert. According to Masazumi Mizuno, founder of the 18-year-old Masazumi Kai, Yuize is one of Japan's leading virtuoso koto players.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 2003 | Constance Meyer, Special to The Times
Growing up in South Korea, Connie Paik took music lessons for granted. "Every child learned the piano," she recalls. "It was a basic, just part of the curriculum: math, science, piano, etc. If your parents didn't start you on piano, then there was something wrong with your parents." Paik, now a homemaker in Torrance, has observed that "many American mothers think music is something special, that they can only do it when the kid is 'talented' or 'gifted.'
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 2008 | Diane Haithman, Times Staff Writer
The Suzuki method of music instruction, developed in the 1940s by Japanese violinist Shinichi Suzuki, offers an entry point into learning an instrument for children as young as 2 and calls for parents to attend lessons and be hands-on when it comes to at-home practice.
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