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Shintaro Abe

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May 16, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Shintaro Abe, Japan's foreign minister at the height of the nation's transformation into a global economic power, the diplomat credited with smoothing relations with the United States and most recently a leading candidate for the post of prime minister, died Wednesday of liver failure. He was 67. Abe had been hospitalized since January and died clasping his wife's hand at Juntendo University Hospital, Liberal Democratic Party officials said.
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NEWS
May 16, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Shintaro Abe, Japan's foreign minister at the height of the nation's transformation into a global economic power, the diplomat credited with smoothing relations with the United States and most recently a leading candidate for the post of prime minister, died Wednesday of liver failure. He was 67. Abe had been hospitalized since January and died clasping his wife's hand at Juntendo University Hospital, Liberal Democratic Party officials said.
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NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From United Press International
The politician viewed as the likely successor to Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita acknowledged Friday that his wife received a monthly consultant's fee from the company at the center of Japan's political scandal. Shintaro Abe, 64, secretary general of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, called a news conference to confirm a report that his wife, Yoko Abe, received $2,300 a month as a consultant for Recruit Co. from February, 1986, to September, 1988. Takeshita acknowledged Tuesday that he and close aides accepted $1.15 million in donations and discounted stock from Recruit Co.
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corruption is out of fashion as an issue in Japanese politics these days, and cries for political reform have given way to an adage: It's better for a politician to be a little dirty and get the job done than to be very clean but incompetent.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Japan's former Foreign Minister, Shintaro Abe, said Friday on the eve of departing for Washington that he will take with him proposals aimed at settling a series of trade disputes. "They will be appreciated," Abe told reporters. He said he will tell President Reagan and other U.S. officials that "neither retaliation nor protectionism" will redress the imbalance in U.S. trade with Japan. "Rather," Abe said, "we must seek a solution by continuing calm and dispassionate discussions."
NEWS
February 3, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Corruption is out of fashion as an issue in Japanese politics these days, and cries for political reform have given way to an adage: It's better for a politician to be a little dirty and get the job done than to be very clean but incompetent.
NEWS
May 30, 1986 | United Press International
Japanese Foreign Minister Shintaro Abe arrived in Moscow on Thursday for an official visit that includes talks with his Soviet counterpart on ways to speed the thaw in relations between the two countries.
NEWS
June 13, 1985 | United Press International
Japanese Foreign Minister Shintaro Abe conferred Wednesday with East German leader Erich Honecker and Foreign Minister Oskar Fischer. Abe, who arrived in East Berlin on Tuesday night, met Fischer at the Foreign Ministry and later conferred with Honecker, the president and Communist Party general secretary, at the State Council building in the presence of Fischer.
NEWS
October 23, 1985 | Associated Press
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze is expected here in mid-January to resume consultations broken off in 1978, a Japanese Foreign Ministry official said Tuesday. The unnamed official said that Soviet Ambassador Pyotr Abrasimov met Monday with Foreign Minister Shintaro Abe and discussed the timing of Shevardnadze's visit.
NEWS
July 2, 1986
Japanese Foreign Minister Shintaro Abe said he will seek the leadership of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party this year. Abe, campaigning for Sunday's general election, told a press conference that the public wants a new generation of leaders. Abe was the first of Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone's three main rivals to announce his bid for the party post.
NEWS
April 15, 1989 | From United Press International
The politician viewed as the likely successor to Prime Minister Noboru Takeshita acknowledged Friday that his wife received a monthly consultant's fee from the company at the center of Japan's political scandal. Shintaro Abe, 64, secretary general of the ruling Liberal Democratic Party, called a news conference to confirm a report that his wife, Yoko Abe, received $2,300 a month as a consultant for Recruit Co. from February, 1986, to September, 1988. Takeshita acknowledged Tuesday that he and close aides accepted $1.15 million in donations and discounted stock from Recruit Co.
NEWS
April 18, 1987 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
Japan's former Foreign Minister, Shintaro Abe, said Friday on the eve of departing for Washington that he will take with him proposals aimed at settling a series of trade disputes. "They will be appreciated," Abe told reporters. He said he will tell President Reagan and other U.S. officials that "neither retaliation nor protectionism" will redress the imbalance in U.S. trade with Japan. "Rather," Abe said, "we must seek a solution by continuing calm and dispassionate discussions."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1985 | Associated Press
Foreign Minister Shintaro Abe will meet Secretary of State George P. Shultz on April 14 to discuss contents of a package of trade measures that the Japanese government is preparing, the Kyodo news service reported Saturday. Kyodo said Abe will explain progress made in opening up its markets to foreign companies in the fields of telecommunications, electronics, pharmaceuticals and medical equipment and forest products.
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