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Shintaro Ishihara

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January 20, 1991 | Michael Lewis, Lewis is the author of "Liar's Poker" (W. W. Norton).
An early version of "A Japan That Can Say No" was pirated by the Pentagon from the Japanese original, and appeared in the summer of 1989. Lord knows why they bothered. Perhaps they were blinded by the seeming importance of its authors: Shintaro Ishihara, a senior Japanese politician, and Aiko Morita, the chairman of Sony.
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WORLD
February 6, 2011 | By Yuriko Nagano, Los Angeles Times
Japanese public high school teacher Sawa Kawamura used to smile on her way to work. But in recent years, this quiet woman has come to dread the classroom. In 2004, Kawamura, a slender fiftysomething teacher with long black hair, refused to stand and sing while the national anthem was played. She was given a formal warning that she had defied instructions from her superiors. The notice remains on her record and could haunt her when she is up for rehiring. "It's only twice a year, during formal school ceremonies, that we're ordered to sing the anthem," Kawamura said, "but it has changed relations at work.
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WORLD
April 14, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Tokyo's governor won reelection in a race seen as a test of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's economic policies and support for the war in Iraq. Shintaro Ishihara, 70, defeated four other candidates to win another four-year term, public TV broadcaster NHK said. Ishihara, considered a potential candidate for prime minister, ran as an independent but was endorsed by Koizumi's party.
WORLD
December 16, 2010 | By Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
The titles in one corner of Kinokuniya bookstore in Tokyo's Shinjuku district suggest the kind of themes that manga comics fans crave: romance, feudal-era adventure, betrayal. But above the packed bookshelves a sign reads, "Adult manga. " It's the hard-core content within this genre of comics or cartoons, depicting rape, incest and sex crimes, that lawmakers in Tokyo want to keep out of the hands of minors. The Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly on Wednesday approved an ordinance that makes it illegal to sell or rent sexually explicit manga and anime that "unjustifiably glorifies" violent sexual acts to anyone younger than 18. The law, which goes into effect next year, also bans images of fictional characters that appear to be underage and are engaging in sexual acts.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | CLAYTON JONES, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
A year ago, Japan's Parliament approved a resolution to move the nation's capital out of Tokyo. But as one prominent politician, Shintaro Ishihara, said afterward, "When we voted for it, we were laughing all the way." Few Japanese seriously believe their government will help decongest Tokyo by transplanting itself to another site. The plan's opponents--bureaucrats, the Tokyo government and national legislators from the city--have so far blocked a national consensus to carry out the idea.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | From Associated Press
American business managers are "inferior" and U.S. leaders do not understand either their own country or Japan, a Japanese lawmaker was quoted Saturday as saying. The comments by Shintaro Ishihara, a former transportation minister, reported by the Kyodo News Service, come a week after House Speaker Yoshio Sakurauchi said American workers are lazy and illiterate and that the United States had become a "subcontractor" for Japan. Those remarks sparked a storm of criticism in the United States.
NEWS
April 15, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prize-winning novelist who 27 years ago plunged into politics hoping to reinvigorate a national pride lost in war--even if it meant standing up to the United States--suddenly resigned his seat in Parliament on Friday. Japanese politics is "despised by the people, and all politicians, myself included, are responsible," declared Shintaro Ishihara, 62, co-author of a 1989 book that urged Japan to reject unreasonable U.S. trade and security demands.
WORLD
December 16, 2010 | By Kenji Hall, Los Angeles Times
The titles in one corner of Kinokuniya bookstore in Tokyo's Shinjuku district suggest the kind of themes that manga comics fans crave: romance, feudal-era adventure, betrayal. But above the packed bookshelves a sign reads, "Adult manga. " It's the hard-core content within this genre of comics or cartoons, depicting rape, incest and sex crimes, that lawmakers in Tokyo want to keep out of the hands of minors. The Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly on Wednesday approved an ordinance that makes it illegal to sell or rent sexually explicit manga and anime that "unjustifiably glorifies" violent sexual acts to anyone younger than 18. The law, which goes into effect next year, also bans images of fictional characters that appear to be underage and are engaging in sexual acts.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shintaro Ishihara, author of the controversial book "The Japan That Can Say No," has presented his own 109 demands for American economic reform and warned that opening the Japanese market, by itself, would not eliminate the trade imbalance between the two nations. Ishihara told foreign correspondents Friday that he agrees with U.S. negotiators who are demanding that Japan dramatically increase spending on public works to improve living standards and pull in imports.
BUSINESS
October 11, 1989 | JAMES FLANIGAN
Akio Morita, the renowned founder and chairman of Sony Corp., has made an error in judgment. He has co-authored a book, with an anti-American Japanese politician, titled "The Japan That Can Say 'No' ." The book advises Japan to say no to U.S. demands on trade and investment and also on defense. "The time has come for Japan to tell the U.S. that we do not need American protection.
WORLD
April 14, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Tokyo's governor won reelection in a race seen as a test of Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi's economic policies and support for the war in Iraq. Shintaro Ishihara, 70, defeated four other candidates to win another four-year term, public TV broadcaster NHK said. Ishihara, considered a potential candidate for prime minister, ran as an independent but was endorsed by Koizumi's party.
NEWS
April 13, 2000 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lashing out at critics and the media, Tokyo's foot-in-mouth governor said Wednesday that he was misquoted, misjudged and misunderstood when he warned that foreigners could riot after Japan's next major earthquake. Gov. Shintaro Ishihara's comments earlier this week about non-Japanese Asians--along with his choice of wording--have sparked widespread criticism. The controversy has also rekindled sensitive feelings about World War II and Japan's past treatment of other Asians.
NEWS
April 12, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters in Japan's capital said yes Sunday to hawkish politician and well-known author Shintaro Ishihara, who promised to create a "Tokyo That Can Say No" if elected prefectural governor. The charismatic Ishihara, 66, best known for his largely anti-U.S. policy book, "The Japan That Can Say No," already has begun to create headaches for U.S. and Japanese officials over his vow to recover the Yokota U.S. Air Force base located on Tokyo's outskirts.
NEWS
April 15, 1995 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A prize-winning novelist who 27 years ago plunged into politics hoping to reinvigorate a national pride lost in war--even if it meant standing up to the United States--suddenly resigned his seat in Parliament on Friday. Japanese politics is "despised by the people, and all politicians, myself included, are responsible," declared Shintaro Ishihara, 62, co-author of a 1989 book that urged Japan to reject unreasonable U.S. trade and security demands.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | CLAYTON JONES, CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR
A year ago, Japan's Parliament approved a resolution to move the nation's capital out of Tokyo. But as one prominent politician, Shintaro Ishihara, said afterward, "When we voted for it, we were laughing all the way." Few Japanese seriously believe their government will help decongest Tokyo by transplanting itself to another site. The plan's opponents--bureaucrats, the Tokyo government and national legislators from the city--have so far blocked a national consensus to carry out the idea.
NEWS
January 26, 1992 | From Associated Press
American business managers are "inferior" and U.S. leaders do not understand either their own country or Japan, a Japanese lawmaker was quoted Saturday as saying. The comments by Shintaro Ishihara, a former transportation minister, reported by the Kyodo News Service, come a week after House Speaker Yoshio Sakurauchi said American workers are lazy and illiterate and that the United States had become a "subcontractor" for Japan. Those remarks sparked a storm of criticism in the United States.
NEWS
August 6, 1989 | SAM JAMESON, Times Staff Writer
The three men hoping to succeed outgoing Prime Minister Sosuke Uno offered three different solutions Saturday to Japan's economic frictions with the United States. They ranged from better explanations to Washington of actions Japan already is taking to a get-tough-with-America approach. The likely winner, former Education Minister Toshiki Kaifu, 58, suggested better explanations. He said that the United States has failed to understand the improvements Japan is achieving.
NEWS
April 12, 1999 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Voters in Japan's capital said yes Sunday to hawkish politician and well-known author Shintaro Ishihara, who promised to create a "Tokyo That Can Say No" if elected prefectural governor. The charismatic Ishihara, 66, best known for his largely anti-U.S. policy book, "The Japan That Can Say No," already has begun to create headaches for U.S. and Japanese officials over his vow to recover the Yokota U.S. Air Force base located on Tokyo's outskirts.
BOOKS
January 20, 1991 | Michael Lewis, Lewis is the author of "Liar's Poker" (W. W. Norton).
An early version of "A Japan That Can Say No" was pirated by the Pentagon from the Japanese original, and appeared in the summer of 1989. Lord knows why they bothered. Perhaps they were blinded by the seeming importance of its authors: Shintaro Ishihara, a senior Japanese politician, and Aiko Morita, the chairman of Sony.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shintaro Ishihara, author of the controversial book "The Japan That Can Say No," has presented his own 109 demands for American economic reform and warned that opening the Japanese market, by itself, would not eliminate the trade imbalance between the two nations. Ishihara told foreign correspondents Friday that he agrees with U.S. negotiators who are demanding that Japan dramatically increase spending on public works to improve living standards and pull in imports.
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