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February 23, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
A 50-year-old grudge against Emperor Hirohito brought the Rev. Young Chang Park to Tokyo this week, as royalty and heads of state and government from around the world gathered to honor the late Japanese monarch in funeral ceremonies Friday.
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NEWS
February 23, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer
A 50-year-old grudge against Emperor Hirohito brought the Rev. Young Chang Park to Tokyo this week, as royalty and heads of state and government from around the world gathered to honor the late Japanese monarch in funeral ceremonies Friday.
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NEWS
February 24, 1989 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, Times Staff Writer and
Emperor Hirohito, a man once despised by much of the world as the symbol of ruthless Japanese military aggression, was honored by the international community today as kings, presidents and other representatives of 163 countries attended his elaborate state funeral.
NEWS
July 14, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
When five teenage girls take their places to play bells aboard the parade floats in the Gion Festival in Kyoto, Japan, next week, they will be the first to do so in 300 years. Since the 18th century, the upper deck of the floats, considered a sacred stage for court musicians, has been off limits to women. "Times have changed," said Shigeru Fukami, head of the organizing association. "We can no longer find a convincing reason to keep rejecting women from participating."
NEWS
January 9, 1989 | Associated Press
Japan's new emperor said today he will help safeguard the democratic constitution, and leftist politicians urged vigilance against any government effort to use the monarchy for "reactionary" ends. One Communist and five Socialist legislators boycotted the ceremony at which Emperor Akihito pledged himself to the constitution imposed by the United States after World War II, but two Socialists did attend.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1993
In the arcane world of Japan's sumo wrestling, history has been made. The first foreigner, or gaijin, has become grand champion of a sport unique to Japan. And he is an American, at that. Chad Rowan, 23, whose professional name is Akebono, was unanimously recommended to become the grand champion, or yokozuna, by an advisory panel to sumo's ruling body.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1991
The 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor can serve as a step toward building a world filled with more understanding and harmony. It may help the American public to know that there were some in Japan 50 years ago who not only opposed the war against the United States, but even one who gave his life for his beliefs, Tsunesaburo Makiguchi. Makiguchi, who founded the Buddhist lay persons' organization now known as the Soka Gakkai (value-creation society), opposed the war and the Japanese military government's attempts to unite all religions behind the war effort.
NEWS
January 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
Despite outward differences, common threads connected New Year's celebrations around the world: jubilation, libation, thronging crowds, fireworks and attempts to replace the old with the new. Millions visited churches, temples or shrines. Others partied to everything from songs to explosives. Greeks hit the gaming tables. Parisians feasted on home-delivered gourmet meals. In one Pakistani state, however, authorities took the opposite approach and banned fun.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | S.L. BACHMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Some pretty weird stuff is on display in Japan. There are, for example, a 29-foot tapeworm, a collection of ruined laundry and a very big, bright-red sock made for pro wrestler Giant Baba. This is a land of obsessive collectors and odd museums. "If Japanese are rich, they collect paintings; if they are not rich, they collect whatever they can," said Hideo Nishioka, director of a museum of Tokyo's history. He collects toilet paper, ashtrays and cookbooks.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this era of Japan bashing, it's easy to forget that a couple years ago almost all things Japanese--design, technical innovation, fashion, sushi, workaholism--were practically worshiped in this country. But there was one aspect of Japanese life that never found much acceptance in the West--the Japanese bath. That's a pity. Indeed, there are other activities that are as relaxing, sensual or cleansing.
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