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Ship Accidents

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NEWS
November 2, 1989 | From Associated Press
Nine sailors were injured by smoke inhalation and four of them suffered burns in a fire Wednesday aboard the oiler Monongahela in the eastern Atlantic, the fifth incident this week involving Navy vessels. One civilian specialist on industrial hazards warned that cutbacks in Navy training could lead to more such accidents. "Congress is always trying to cut training budgets. But, if a pilot can't practice flying, those on the deck don't get trained either. . . .
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 21, 2012 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
With a wrecked cruise ship still half submerged off the coast of Italy and Europe mired in economic troubles, the world's cruise line industry has been navigating turbulent waters. Industry leaders and analysts say the $37-billion industry is slowly rebounding from the crash of the Costa Concordia on rocks near the Tuscan island of Giglio in January and Europe's economic woes. With the peak cruise booking period set to begin in January, industry executives say cruise trip reservations seem to be on the rise.
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WORLD
November 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
As the death toll from the gangway collapse on the Queen Mary 2 cruise ship rose to 15, French President Jacques Chirac urged a rapid investigation into what he called "an incomprehensible tragedy." Prosecutors launched a judicial inquiry against "unknown persons" on charges of manslaughter and involuntary injury in Saturday's accident, which sent visitors to the world's largest cruise ship plunging at least 50 feet to the bottom of a dry dock in the town of Saint Nazaire.
WORLD
January 15, 2012 | Sarah Delaney
Divers scoured the water for survivors and passengers told of Titanic-style pandemonium and being abandoned by crew members Saturday after a luxury cruise liner was ripped open by rocks off the Italian coast. At least three people died and 40 were injured in the accident near Tuscany, which forced more than 4,200 passengers and crew members to abandon the ship Costa Concordia on Friday evening. Dramatic photos taken Saturday showed the jumbo liner tipped over in the water, a long gash in its hull, near the small island of Giglio.
NEWS
February 15, 1988 | ANN WIENER, Times Staff Writer
A honeymooner who told authorities that a strong wind blew his wife over the side of a ship cruising 30 miles southwest of San Diego was being held without bail Sunday on suspicion of murder, officials said. Scott Robin Roston, 36, of Santa Monica, was arrested in Long Beach when the luxury liner, Star Dancer, docked Saturday afternoon. He was being held by federal authorities at the Terminal Island detention center and is awaiting a hearing with the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1996 | PETER HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Circling the world for three months on an ocean liner while earning a semester's worth of college credits has been a life-changing adventure for thousands of students who have joined the University of Pittsburgh's Semester at Sea program. But a recent handful of accidental deaths has some Southern California parents contending that the experience should come with a warning label.
NEWS
March 4, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
A Danish cargo ship loaded with 400 tons of dynamite and detonators and abandoned by its crew after a fire drifted in the English Channel on Tuesday. Coast guard officials warned vessels in the busy international waterway to steer clear of the ship for fear that the fire may be continuing and could trigger a huge explosion. The crew of two men and three women abandoned the 1,000-ton, 136-foot Hornestrand on Tuesday morning after Capt. Niels Bach Kristensen saw smoke coming from a hold.
NEWS
October 24, 2001 | Associated Press
The families of nine Japanese men and teenage boys who were killed Feb. 9 when a U.S. submarine sank the Ehime Maru visited the area Tuesday where Navy divers are working to recover the victims' remains. Twenty members of the nine families were taken out to sea on a catamaran to view the recovery area. They stayed for 30 minutes and threw flowers into the ocean. They ended their visit by waving goodbye to the divers and crew members aboard a giant diving barge.
NEWS
December 10, 1992 | DOUGLAS BIRCH, THE BALTIMORE SUN
They roar up suddenly out of the sea, giant waves up to six stories tall that can smash oil tankers, swallow ocean liners or sweep across the decks of aircraft carriers. Now, a Johns Hopkins University scientist and his former student have begun to describe the shapes these waves can take, work that ship designers may one day use to anticipate the worst the sea can toss at them.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New York City's director of ferries pleaded not guilty to 11 counts of manslaughter in the October wreck of a Staten Island ferry. Patrick Ryan left the federal courthouse without speaking to reporters. His attorney, Tom Fitzpatrick, said he and Ryan were taken aback by the harshness of the charges. Eleven people died and dozens were hurt when the ferry's pilot blacked out and the craft slammed into a maintenance pier.
NATIONAL
February 10, 2009
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2008 | By the Associated Press
The Navy has punished six sailors for their roles in a fire that caused $70 million in damage to the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier George Washington, a newspaper reported Monday. U.S. Pacific Fleet officials say the six were given nonjudicial punishments, meaning no sailor was discharged from the Navy, according to the Navy Times. The Navy did not release the names or ranks of those punished. The punishments come two months after the Navy relieved the carrier's commanding officer and executive officer of duty over the May 22 fire.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2008 | Pervaiz Shallwani, Newsday
A federal appeals court ruled Thursday that because of its "negligent acts," the city cannot limit its liability to $14.4 million, the value of the Staten Island ferry that crashed in October 2003, killing 11 people and injuring more than 70. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the city "did not act with reasonable care" when it allowed assistant Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2008 | John M. Glionna, Times Staff Writer
The pilot of the cargo ship that sideswiped the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in November and spilled 58,000 gallons of fuel oil was charged Monday with criminal negligence and violating two federal environmental laws. Capt. John J. Cota, 60, was charged in federal court in San Francisco with one count each of violating the Clean Water Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, both misdemeanors. Cota was at the helm Nov.
NATIONAL
January 11, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Improper training and bad steering by a Princess Cruises ship's second officer caused the vessel to tilt suddenly in 2006, injuring almost 300 people, the National Transportation Safety Board determined. The NTSB said the Crown Princess' captain and crew failed to realize how fast they were going in shallow water, which threw the ship off course. The second officer disengaged the autopilot to correct it, then steered the wrong way, the board determined in Orlando. Princess Cruises apologized to passengers and said it had already made changes requiring further navigation training for crews and better oversight for deck officers.
WORLD
May 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A ship carrying 4,000 cars sank after colliding with an oil tanker south of Singapore, authorities said. The four Korean and 16 Filipino crew members on car carrier MV Hyundai No. 105 were rescued, Maritime and Port Authority spokeswoman Theresa Pong said. There was no immediate leak from the Panama-registered tanker MT Kaminesan, despite some damage, she said. The tanker, carrying 279,949 tons of crude oil, was being towed into Singapore's port for damage assessment.
NEWS
May 30, 2000 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maxwell Bhikham and Alan George gave their lives for $5 a day. Or $13, if you include tips. Bhikham was a Guyanese deckhand, age 28. George, 23, was a steward from Grenada. On Oct. 27, 1998, they were two of 31 worried crew members aboard the schooner Fantome in the waters off Honduras. The Fantome was not a typical cruise ship.
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