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Ship Accidents Alaska

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NEWS
October 8, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unpublished studies by state and federal researchers contend that the true cost of environmental damage from the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska could be as high as $15 billion, according to experts familiar with the secret reports. The figure stands in dramatic contrast to the $1.125-billion settlement that Exxon Corp. agreed to last week to settle criminal and civil complaints brought by the state of Alaska and the federal government. Alaska Gov. Walter J.
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NEWS
April 4, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
As the search for the crew of a missing fishing vessel continued for a second day, the Coast Guard began preliminary work to determine why the Arctic Rose sank so suddenly, without even enough time for the crew to radio for help. Fifteen crew members were aboard the 92-foot vessel when it went down in the Bering Sea, about 775 miles southwest of Anchorage. The only sign of trouble was a signal from the vessel's emergency beacon at 3:30 a.m. Monday.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 1990 | PATRICK LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Refinery worker Walter Blusewicz has noticed a change in Exxon Corp.'s attitude in the year since one of its tankers disgorged 10.9 million gallons of crude oil into the waters off Alaska. From the highest corporate levels to the smallest detail, Exxon is scrutinizing every operation with an eye toward improving its environmental and safety record to prevent additional accidents, he said.
NEWS
April 3, 2001 | From Times wire services
Two crewmen were dead and 13 were missing after a U.S. fishing vessel vanished in the icy Bering Sea in what could be Alaska's worst fishing disaster, the Coast Guard said. The Arctic Rose, a 92-foot boat harvesting rock sole, sank in rough seas about 200 miles northwest of St. Paul Island, about 850 miles southwest of Anchorage. The Coast Guard received emergency signals from the vessel at 3:30 a.m. and sent a search plane, a helicopter and rescue ships. The C-130 aircraft arrived at 8:30 a.m.
NEWS
February 15, 1990 | From United Press International
Exxon Valdez Third Mate Gregory Cousins testified Wednesday in his former skipper's trial that the tanker ran aground for one reason--the helmsman failed to execute steering orders given by Cousins. Cousins said he is convinced that the Exxon Valdez would have missed Bligh Reef by 2 miles if the orders of Capt. Joseph Hazelwood, who has since been fired, had been carried out.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | Associated Press
Exxon Corp. and its shipping subsidiary pleaded guilty Friday to misdemeanor violations in the nation's worst oil spill under a plea agreement with the federal government. U.S. District Judge Russel Holland allowed the pleas but delayed sentencing until he gathers public comment on the plea agreement. He set sentencing for April 24. If Holland rejects the agreement, the corporation can withdraw its pleas. If he accepts it, federal felony charges against the oil company will be dropped.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | Associated Press
Coast Guard on Friday suspended its search for the bodies of nine men presumed drowned after their fishing trawler capsized and sank in the frigid Bering Sea. Fishing vessels rescued 22 crew members who had abandoned the sinking ship on lifeboats. They were reported in good condition aboard a trawler that was taking them to Dutch Harbor, about 250 miles southeast of the accident site.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The final prosecution witnesses in the Joseph Hazelwood trial in Anchorage testified that the Exxon Valdez skipper drank enough vodka to impair judgment before the tanker sailed, and that he risked capsizing by rocking the ship back and forth after the helmsman drove it onto a reef. Alaska Superior Court Judge Karl Johnstone refused to allow testimony from a state investigator assigned to guard Hazelwood after the March 24 grounding.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A defense request to sequester the jury in the Anchorage trial of the captain of the Exxon Valdez to shield them from publicity of the approaching anniversary of the nation's worst oil spill was rejected by state Superior Court Judge Karl Johnstone. But Johnstone granted the defense what it called a "major victory" in ruling that Joseph Hazelwood could not be considered guilty of acting recklessly for attempting to dislodge the grounded tanker from Bligh Reef.
NEWS
June 15, 1999 | Associated Press
Salvage boats and workers kept close watch on a grounded cruise ship Monday, looking for fuel spills and preparing for an attempt to float the vessel free on Tuesday's high tide. The 156-foot Wilderness Adventurer ran aground Saturday afternoon on rocks in Dundas Bay, a scenic inlet in Glacier Bay National Park. The impact cracked the vessel's hull and it began taking on water, but the 56 passengers and 24 crew were evacuated safely.
NEWS
January 28, 1997 | Associated Press
A 400-foot barge overturned, possibly spilling its cargo and fuel into Alaska's lower Cook Inlet. Officials believed the barge Oregon lost its cargo of 12,500 tons of a chemical fertilizer and 1,600 gallons of diesel fuel. But high seas and wind gusts of up to 50 mph frustrated efforts to anchor the vessel and judge the damage. The vessel capsized Saturday after colliding with a tugboat. It was towed to a nearby bay Sunday.
NEWS
January 4, 1995 | DAVID HULEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the frigid, stormy waters of the Gulf of Alaska, amid the killer whales and sea lions and king salmon, researchers have discovered a new species of Pacific wildlife that is yielding mounds of scientific data about the marine environment. Rubber duckies. Molded plastic duckies, actually. Thousands of them. And not just ducks--frogs, turtles and beavers too.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1994 | DAVID HULEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a verdict that could cost Exxon Corp. billions of dollars, a jury found Monday that company executives and the skipper of the Exxon Valdez acted recklessly in the events leading to America's worst oil spill. The verdict came in a massive civil lawsuit brought by some 10,000 commercial fishermen, Native Americans, landowners and others harmed by the 1989 spill in Prince William Sound. The plaintiffs are seeking $1.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After all the millions of gallons of oil sloshed into the sea, after all those tears, the dead and suffering animals, poisoned shellfish, drowned otters, uncaught fish, defiled beaches, economic dislocation, finger-pointing and excuse-making--after all of that, now a pot of gold tantalizes Alaska at the end of disaster's rainbow. The tortured tale of the Exxon Valdez lives on.
NEWS
July 11, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Alaska Court of Appeals on Friday overturned a misdemeanor conviction against the captain of an Exxon Corp. tanker that ran aground in the spring of 1989, causing the nation's worst oil spill. The state used tainted evidence against Joseph Hazelwood, who was immune from prosecution under federal law, the court ruled in throwing out his conviction on a charge of negligent discharge of oil. The state said it will appeal the ruling to the Alaska Supreme Court.
NEWS
January 29, 1990 | United Press International
Fired Capt. Joseph Hazelwood goes on trial today on criminal charges arising from the wreck of the Exxon Valdez, which spilled about 11 million gallons of oil. A jury will be selected to decide whether the skipper, who was not at the helm when his tanker ran aground March 24, bears criminal responsibility for the wreck, which ruined fishing and killed thousands of birds and otters.
NEWS
November 27, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Alaska, noting that crude oil remains on hundreds of its beaches, said Exxon Corp.'s cleanup task will not be finished until the state says it is. With release of its 1991 Exxon Valdez oil spill response plan, Alaska gave the company one more year to remove oil lost when the tanker hit a reef in Prince William Sound 20 months ago. Although the Coast Guard is directing the cleanup, the plan asserts Alaska's right to exact a higher standard for state beaches.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Valdez Trials Set for 1993: A judge in Anchorage has ordered civil trials over the Exxon Valdez oil spill to begin in April, 1993. Superior Court Judge Brian Shortell divided the cases into requests for punitive damages and lawsuits filed for other compensation. Exxon Corp. lawyers have said they expect to turn over about 30 million pages of documents for the trials and face about 19,000 lawsuits over the nation's worst oil spill.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unpublished studies by state and federal researchers contend that the true cost of environmental damage from the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska could be as high as $15 billion, according to experts familiar with the secret reports. The figure stands in dramatic contrast to the $1.125-billion settlement that Exxon Corp. agreed to last week to settle criminal and civil complaints brought by the state of Alaska and the federal government. Alaska Gov. Walter J.
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