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Ship Accidents Antarctica

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NEWS
February 1, 1989
A Greenpeace ship and a Japanese whaling vessel collided off Antarctica in the most serious incident since the environmental group began a campaign a week ago to stop the whale hunt. The Japanese ship Nisshin Maru No. 3 sustained minor damage to its handrails, but the Greenpeace ship Gondwana was not damaged and there were no injuries, Greenpeace spokesman Peter Wilkinson said via radio telephone from the Gondwana to Sydney, Australia.
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NEWS
April 5, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The upturned hull of a sunken Argentine tourist ship has nearly slipped from sight, barely breaking the surface now like one of the playful whales that swim these frigid but plentiful waters. Yet the somber memories of the wreck last year, and the oil it spilled within sight of a premier U.S. research station, endure as forceful symbols of the hazards posed by the growing human presence in Antarctica.
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NEWS
January 31, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
An Argentine ship carrying supplies and tourists has run aground two miles from a U.S. research base in Antarctica, leaking diesel fuel and posing a major environmental threat, according to the U.S. National Science Foundation. NSF officials said the ship is in imminent danger of breaking up and releasing its 250,000 gallons of diesel fuel, as well as the gasoline and jet fuel it is carrying.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The British ice patrol ship Endurance on Monday rescued 65 scientists and sailors from a Peruvian ocean research vessel that ran aground in an Antarctic storm, the Defense Ministry said. The 1,980-ton Humboldt was taking on water after hitting rocks Sunday night off King George Island, about 500 miles south of the tip of South America, the ministry said.
NEWS
February 28, 1989 | From Associated Press
The British ice patrol ship Endurance on Monday rescued 65 scientists and sailors from a Peruvian ocean research vessel that ran aground in an Antarctic storm, the Defense Ministry said. The 1,980-ton Humboldt was taking on water after hitting rocks Sunday night off King George Island, about 500 miles south of the tip of South America, the ministry said.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Foul weather off the tip of South America on Thursday forced one Argentine ship to abandon its effort to reach a stricken vessel that is leaking oil into the pristine waters off Antarctica, and scientists warned that as winter approaches in the Southern Hemisphere, storms could soon cut off any hopes of salvaging the ship and containing the spill.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
U.S. and Argentine divers have staunched the flow of oil leaking from an Argentine supply vessel that ran aground in the Antarctic and have begun offloading barrels of oil and gasoline, a process that could take a month or longer, National Science Foundation officials said Friday. An estimated 500 to 600 metric tons of diesel fuel escaped from the ship, but researchers said most of the oil that is not vacuumed up by skimmers flown in for the clean-up will evaporate in 10 days.
NEWS
April 5, 1990 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The upturned hull of a sunken Argentine tourist ship has nearly slipped from sight, barely breaking the surface now like one of the playful whales that swim these frigid but plentiful waters. Yet the somber memories of the wreck last year, and the oil it spilled within sight of a premier U.S. research station, endure as forceful symbols of the hazards posed by the growing human presence in Antarctica.
NEWS
February 11, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
U.S. and Argentine divers have staunched the flow of oil leaking from an Argentine supply vessel that ran aground in the Antarctic and have begun offloading barrels of oil and gasoline, a process that could take a month or longer, National Science Foundation officials said Friday. An estimated 500 to 600 metric tons of diesel fuel escaped from the ship, but researchers said most of the oil that is not vacuumed up by skimmers flown in for the clean-up will evaporate in 10 days.
NEWS
February 9, 1989
A three-nation effort continued to try to clean up a fuel oil spill from a grounded Argentine supply ship that has been threatening wildlife in the ecologically fragile Antarctic since late last month. A Chilean crew surrounded the submerged ship with floating barriers in an attempt to contain the spill, while a U.S. team, using a special boat, skimmed the waters to collect the oil, officials said.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | LEE DYE, Times Science Writer
Foul weather off the tip of South America on Thursday forced one Argentine ship to abandon its effort to reach a stricken vessel that is leaking oil into the pristine waters off Antarctica, and scientists warned that as winter approaches in the Southern Hemisphere, storms could soon cut off any hopes of salvaging the ship and containing the spill.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Science Writer
An Argentine ship carrying supplies and tourists has run aground two miles from a U.S. research base in Antarctica, leaking diesel fuel and posing a major environmental threat, according to the U.S. National Science Foundation. NSF officials said the ship is in imminent danger of breaking up and releasing its 250,000 gallons of diesel fuel, as well as the gasoline and jet fuel it is carrying.
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