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Ship Accidents Florida

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NEWS
December 5, 1989 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The U.S. Navy successfully launched a Trident 2 missile from a submarine submerged off the coast of Florida on Monday, but not before ramming a hole in the side of a Greenpeace vessel and towing away protesters who sought to stop the test. Navy spokesmen say the launch of the $26.5-million missile from the submarine Tennessee put the troubled Trident program back on track after its last two test shots blew up seconds after they broke water.
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NEWS
May 2, 2001 | Reuters
Unauthorized welding on laundry room equipment ignited a fire aboard the cruise ship Ecstasy off Miami in 1998, injuring 22 people and causing more than $17 million in damage, U.S. safety investigators concluded Tuesday. The National Transportation Safety Board said that sparks from the welding caused a fire that ignited a large accumulation of lint in the laundry room ventilation ducts. Owned by Carnival Corp.
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NEWS
July 21, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,500 passengers who boarded Carnival Cruise Lines' luxury ship Ecstasy for a four-day "Fun Ship" vacation quickly found themselves strapped into life jackets, huddled on the top deck and having no fun at all Monday after a shipboard fire stopped the vessel dead in the water just 1 1/2 miles off shore.
NEWS
March 8, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long list of Caribbean migrants who have perished at sea while trying to reach Florida grew by at least 36 on Sunday as the U.S. Coast Guard abandoned the search for survivors from two boatloads of Haitians that sank in the Gulf Stream. Three men were rescued early Saturday and two bodies were recovered after the small, overloaded fishing vessels went down about 30 miles east of Palm Beach. Survivors told U.S.
NEWS
March 8, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The long list of Caribbean migrants who have perished at sea while trying to reach Florida grew by at least 36 on Sunday as the U.S. Coast Guard abandoned the search for survivors from two boatloads of Haitians that sank in the Gulf Stream. Three men were rescued early Saturday and two bodies were recovered after the small, overloaded fishing vessels went down about 30 miles east of Palm Beach. Survivors told U.S.
NEWS
August 28, 1988
Citing a projected $100-million repair cost, Navy investigators have recommended scrapping the fire-damaged submarine Bonefish, the Norfolk Virginian-Pilot and Ledger-Star reported. Three sailors were killed and 23 injured in April when the diesel-powered vessel caught fire off the Florida coast. A report suggests scrapping the 30-year-old sub but does not suggest how to do it.
NEWS
December 8, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two brothers aboard a ship that rammed a fragile coral reef pleaded innocent in Miami to federal charges of operating the vessel recklessly and while intoxicated. A grand jury Wednesday indicted Michael Anthony Bishop, 43, who was at the helm, and crew member Jerry Alan Bishop, 40. State and federal investigators say the empty freighter cut a 200-foot swath through a reef. The Oct.
NEWS
November 2, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 473-foot cargo ship that ran aground in the Dry Tortugas on Monday has caused "massive and extensive" damage to Florida's sensitive coral formations, some of which are 200 years old, Randy Lewis, a spokesman for the state's Department of Natural Resources, said. Lewis said state officials believe the ship destroyed tens of millions of dollars worth of coral. The damage extends along the length of the ship, and about 75 feet beyond the stern, he said.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 600-foot cargo ship ran aground on a sandy shoal in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and the Coast Guard sent divers to check for any damage to the hull and fragile coral reefs. There were no reports of injuries or fuel spills from the grounding of the vessel Houston on Maryland Shoal, 12 miles southeast of Key West, said Petty Officer Jeff Hall. The Liberian-registered ship was bound for Spain from Texas and was off course.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
A 400-foot luxury liner attempting to dock in the Port of Palm Beach Wednesday night hit an anchored Navy ship and tore several holes in the 110-foot vessel, the Coast Guard said. The accident involving the Viking Princess and the unnamed naval cargo loading craft caused no serious injuries to passengers or crew, Coast Guard Petty Officer Jerry Snyder said. "It's a very small harbor," with only two shipping channels and a small area where the cruise liners have to turn around, Snyder said.
NEWS
July 22, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As cruise industry officials hurried to assure millions of potential customers that sea travel is safe, federal inspectors began poking through the blackened stern of the luxury liner Ecstasy on Tuesday to check out a theory that a welding torch may have ignited the raging fire that scuttled a Caribbean vacation for more than 2,500 passengers.
NEWS
July 21, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 2,500 passengers who boarded Carnival Cruise Lines' luxury ship Ecstasy for a four-day "Fun Ship" vacation quickly found themselves strapped into life jackets, huddled on the top deck and having no fun at all Monday after a shipboard fire stopped the vessel dead in the water just 1 1/2 miles off shore.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Salvage experts successfully floated the 600-foot container ship Houston off a patch of sand and coral, where it had been stuck for nearly six days, a Coast Guard spokesman said. None of the freighter's 810,000 gallons of fuel was spilled, according to the Coast Guard. The ship, which ran aground 13 miles southeast of Key West in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, was being towed to a safe anchorage site less than 2 miles away.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Legal wrangling delayed efforts to free a 600-foot container ship grounded on a patch of coral and sand in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, officials said. Salvage experts were scheduled to transfer 540,000 gallons of fuel to a specially equipped barge. The plan was to make the Mexican-flagged ship lighter so a tugboat could drag it free at high tide. But the effort was delayed as two salvage companies argued over responsibility in the event of a fuel spill.
NEWS
February 4, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 600-foot cargo ship ran aground on a sandy shoal in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary and the Coast Guard sent divers to check for any damage to the hull and fragile coral reefs. There were no reports of injuries or fuel spills from the grounding of the vessel Houston on Maryland Shoal, 12 miles southeast of Key West, said Petty Officer Jeff Hall. The Liberian-registered ship was bound for Spain from Texas and was off course.
NEWS
August 5, 1995 | Reuters
Searchers found a body floating inside a life raft from the gambling cruise ship Club Royale, which sank earlier this week in the dangerous seas whipped up by Hurricane Erin, a Coast Guard spokesman said Friday. "We have not yet identified the body," the spokesman said. The raft, which was identified as belonging to the 235-foot ship, was spotted about 200 miles off the Florida-Georgia border, he said.
NEWS
June 21, 1995 | Associated Press
The 1,760 cruise ship passengers who saw their vacation disrupted by a fire that left them adrift were finally moved Tuesday to a newer liner, one with air conditioning and an open bar. The passengers and 800 crew members of the Celebration were taking a mini-cruise through the Bahamas aboard the Ecstasy before returning to Miami on Thursday, said the president of Carnival Cruise Lines, Bob Dickinson. The Celebration had left Miami on Saturday for a weeklong Caribbean cruise to Puerto Rico, St.
NEWS
August 11, 1993 | Associated Press
Two fuel-laden barges and a freighter collided Tuesday in Tampa Bay, touching off explosions and a huge fire and spilling heavy oil that threatened a wildlife refuge. No one was badly hurt. "I heard an explosion, followed by another explosion . . . there was one towering inferno that reached up to the heavens," said Bob Lartz, assistant supervisor at Ft. DeSoto park at the entrance to Tampa Bay.
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