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NEWS
February 11, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The nuclear-powered U.S. submarine that struck a Japanese fishing vessel filled with teenagers was apparently conducting an emergency surfacing exercise in choppy waters, Navy officials said Saturday. Details of the accident, however, remain unclear.
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NEWS
October 9, 2001 | From Associated Press
After overcoming a series of technical setbacks, the Navy hopes to complete recovery of a sunken Japanese fishing vessel this week. If all goes as planned, the Ehime Maru will be towed underwater from the 2,000-foot-deep waters where it lies to a shallow recovery site off Honolulu International Airport, the Navy said Sunday. There, divers will search for the bodies of nine men and teenage boys who died when the fishing high school training vessel from Uwajima, Japan, was rammed by the U.S.
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NEWS
February 10, 2001 | PAUL RICHTER and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A nuclear-powered U.S. submarine surfacing during routine operations Friday off the coast of Hawaii struck and sank a Japanese fishing vessel carrying 35 people, including 13 students from a fisheries high school, authorities here said. Coast Guard teams rescued 26 of those who had been aboard the 150-foot fishing boat, identified as the Ehime Maru, but nine people were still missing as rescue efforts continued into the evening.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | From the Washington Post
The Navy plans to try in August to recover a Japanese fishing vessel that sank after being hit by a U.S. nuclear submarine, moving it to shallow water in hopes of retrieving the bodies of nine Japanese sailors and high school students. In a statement released late Friday night, Navy officials said the $40-million salvage operation off the coast of Honolulu would not pose a significant threat to the environment, even though the ship is carrying thousands of gallons of fuel.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Residents of Uwajima, a town in western Japan that saw nine of its own killed when a U.S. submarine surfaced under a fishing school vessel in February, reacted with anger Friday as it became increasingly clear that the warship's commander will not face criminal charges under U.S. military law. "People here feel that without a court-martial we're never going to know who was really responsible," said Kayoko Yoneda, head of the Uwajima Victims Support Group. "That's why there's such frustration."
NEWS
March 16, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If granted "testimonial immunity," the captain of the attack submarine Greeneville promised Thursday to persuasively refute assertions that he hastily ignored safety procedures in the moments before the sub's deadly collision with a Japanese fishing vessel. Through his attorney, Cmdr. Scott D. Waddle offered to provide a court of inquiry with details about the Feb. 9 accident that "no other witness is able to testify to." In a letter to Adm.
NEWS
March 13, 2001 | From Reuters
The captain of the nuclear submarine Greeneville was to blame for its collision with a Japanese fishing boat that killed nine people because he spent too little time searching the surface with a periscope, a top U.S. Navy submarine official testified Monday. "This is the meat of the matter," Rear Adm. Albert Konetzni, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet's submarine forces, said, adding that sub commanders "have an unbelievable obligation to make sure there's nobody in the area.
NEWS
March 9, 2001 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The captain of a nuclear submarine that crashed into a Japanese fishing boat is not criminally negligent in the accident, which killed nine and caused international outrage, the chief Navy investigator into the incident said Thursday. Even though Cmdr. Scott Waddle, skipper of the Greeneville when it struck the Ehime Maru, bears ultimate responsibility for his crew's actions, that does "not necessarily equate" with criminal liability, said Rear Adm. Charles H. Griffiths Jr.
NEWS
February 13, 2001 | MARIA L. LaGANGA and SUSAN ESSOYAN and TONY PERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As tearful relatives of those missing at sea visited the site of the collision between a U.S. submarine and a Japanese fishing trawler, the Navy dispatched two high-tech undersea vehicles Monday to scour the ocean floor for wreckage--and possibly to recover bodies. Nine crew members, students and teachers who were aboard the trawler when it sank nine miles off Diamond Head on Friday still are unaccounted for.
NEWS
February 19, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The Navy's efforts to scan the wreckage of a Japanese boat sunk by a U.S. submarine were set back when a deep-sea robot was removed from the sea for repairs. The Navy is using the robot to evaluate the feasibility of raising the 190-foot Ehime Maru, which sank minutes after the Greeneville surfaced underneath it Feb. 9.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The four remaining crewmen implicated in the Navy submarine Greeneville's fatal collision with a Japanese fishing vessel have been disciplined. The four were "admonished" by Capt. Tony Cortese, the Greeneville's interim commander, ending the disciplinary action against those held responsible for the Feb. 9 collision that killed nine Japanese. The four are Lt. Cmdr.
NEWS
April 27, 2001 | Associated Press
Former Greeneville skipper Cmdr. Scott D. Waddle said Thursday that the Navy was right to end his 20-year career after his submarine sank a Japanese fishing vessel and killed nine people. "They were absolutely fair," said Waddle, appearing on CNN's "Larry King Live." "If I were in their position, I would take the same stance," he said. Wearing his dress white uniform, Waddle discussed for an hour the Feb. 9 sinking of the Ehime Maru.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The skipper of the U.S. submarine that sank a Japanese fishing vessel was forced into retirement Monday by the Pacific Fleet's top admiral, who accused him of dereliction of duty in the collision that killed nine crew members and students on the trawler. Adm. Thomas Fargo told Cmdr. Scott D. Waddle that he could either retire--with full pension benefits--or face a "show-cause" hearing in which he would have to explain why he should not be booted out of the Navy because of the Feb.
NEWS
April 23, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The commander of the U.S. attack submarine that collided with a Japanese trawler, killing nine people, will be formally asked to quit the Navy, an official said. Cmdr. Scott Waddle has been ordered to report to an "admiral's mast" administrative hearing today, the official said. Adm. Thomas Fargo, commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet, will discuss the findings of a court of inquiry--which urged Fargo to choose an administrative punishment--and Waddle's exit from the Navy.
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | MARK MAGNIER and TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Residents of Uwajima, a town in western Japan that saw nine of its own killed when a U.S. submarine surfaced under a fishing school vessel in February, reacted with anger Friday as it became increasingly clear that the warship's commander will not face criminal charges under U.S. military law. "People here feel that without a court-martial we're never going to know who was really responsible," said Kayoko Yoneda, head of the Uwajima Victims Support Group. "That's why there's such frustration."
NEWS
April 16, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The captain of the U.S. submarine that collided with a Japanese fishing trawler has changed his mind on the politically sensitive issue of whether the presence of civilians on the sub contributed to the deadly crash. Cmdr. Scott Waddle, after constantly reviewing details of the Feb. 9 collision, now believes the presence of 16 civilians in the crowded control room broke the crew's concentration at a critical time, said Waddle's attorney, Charles Gittins.
NEWS
February 22, 2001 | SUSAN ESSOYAN and TONY PERRY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal investigators probing the deadly collision between a U.S. submarine and a Japanese fishing trawler said Wednesday that they now have the information from the sub's "black box," which should help determine how the crew failed to realize that the trawler was virtually overhead. The data recorder should show what sonar information was available to the crew about other ships in the area when the Greeneville's commanding officer gave the order for a rapid ascent, called an "emergency blow."
NEWS
February 26, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The commander of the U.S. submarine that struck and sank a Japanese trawler off Hawaii expressed his "most sincere regret"--but stopped short of an apology. "It is with a heavy heart that I express my most sincere regret" for the accident, Cmdr. Scott Waddle said in a statement sent by his lawyer to Japan's NHK public television network and broadcast to a national audience. Waddle was commanding the Greeneville when it rammed the Ehime Maru on Feb. 9.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Navy spokesman at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, declined to comment Saturday on reports in Japan and the United States that the court of inquiry has not recommended a court-martial against the commander of the U.S. submarine that sank a Japanese fishing trawler. A panel of three admirals delivered Friday its findings and recommendations for discipline to Adm. Thomas Fargo, commander of the Pacific Fleet and a former submarine captain.
NEWS
April 14, 2001 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving the Greeneville disaster closer to conclusion, the admirals who presided over a court of inquiry into the deadly collision between the submarine and a Japanese fishing trawler turned over their report Friday to the commander of the Pacific Fleet. A Navy spokesman at Pearl Harbor said that Adm. Thomas Fargo plans a decision within 30 days on what, if any, punishment to mete out to the submarine's captain, Cmdr. Scott Waddle, and crew.
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