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Ship Accidents Morocco

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NEWS
January 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Cleanup experts Monday tried to patch a crippled Iranian supertanker and protect a sensitive coastline from 37 million gallons of spilled crude oil that has formed a huge slick over the Atlantic Ocean. A tug secured a line to the half-sunken Kharg 5 and began towing the 1,837-foot vessel out to sea, 13 days after an explosion ripped its hull about 400 miles north of Las Palmas, in the Canary Islands. Moroccan technicians struggled to repair a gash in the hull that continued streaming crude oil.
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NEWS
January 5, 1990 | From Reuters
Calm weather has lifted a two-week-old threat of massive oil damage to Morocco from a crippled Iranian supertanker after storms dispersed much of a huge slick drifting near the coast, pollution experts said Thursday. "Even if some oil comes ashore, it will be in isolated patches and easily cleaned up," two French experts said in a report to their government. Damage to oyster beds, rich fishing grounds, nature reserves and miles of tourist beaches is now expected to be minimal.
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NEWS
January 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Cleanup crews spraying more than 15,000 gallons of detergent Tuesday battled a massive oil spill inching toward the Moroccan coastline, and a second leak in the region threatened the Canary Islands. Atlantic winds in the next 24 hours could sweep 20 million gallons of crude oil from a disabled Iranian tanker onto Morocco's coast in a major ecological disaster, navy officers said Tuesday.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
With winds gusting up to 40 m.p.h., heavy sea swells pushed a 100-square-mile oil slick to within 12 miles of Morocco's Atlantic coastline Wednesday, hampering a cleanup operation and raising fears that the vessel could break up in the storm. Meteorologists said weather conditions deteriorated sharply Wednesday and pushed the oil oozing from the 283,632-ton Iranian tanker Kharg 5 toward the port of Oualidia, about 80 miles south of Casablanca.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
With winds gusting up to 40 m.p.h., heavy sea swells pushed a 100-square-mile oil slick to within 12 miles of Morocco's Atlantic coastline Wednesday, hampering a cleanup operation and raising fears that the vessel could break up in the storm. Meteorologists said weather conditions deteriorated sharply Wednesday and pushed the oil oozing from the 283,632-ton Iranian tanker Kharg 5 toward the port of Oualidia, about 80 miles south of Casablanca.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | From Reuters
Calm weather has lifted a two-week-old threat of massive oil damage to Morocco from a crippled Iranian supertanker after storms dispersed much of a huge slick drifting near the coast, pollution experts said Thursday. "Even if some oil comes ashore, it will be in isolated patches and easily cleaned up," two French experts said in a report to their government. Damage to oyster beds, rich fishing grounds, nature reserves and miles of tourist beaches is now expected to be minimal.
NEWS
January 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Cleanup crews spraying more than 15,000 gallons of detergent Tuesday battled a massive oil spill inching toward the Moroccan coastline, and a second leak in the region threatened the Canary Islands. Atlantic winds in the next 24 hours could sweep 20 million gallons of crude oil from a disabled Iranian tanker onto Morocco's coast in a major ecological disaster, navy officers said Tuesday.
NEWS
January 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Cleanup experts Monday tried to patch a crippled Iranian supertanker and protect a sensitive coastline from 37 million gallons of spilled crude oil that has formed a huge slick over the Atlantic Ocean. A tug secured a line to the half-sunken Kharg 5 and began towing the 1,837-foot vessel out to sea, 13 days after an explosion ripped its hull about 400 miles north of Las Palmas, in the Canary Islands. Moroccan technicians struggled to repair a gash in the hull that continued streaming crude oil.
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