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NEWS
June 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Coast Guard reopened the Kill Van Kull waterway between Bayonne, N. J., and Staten Island, N. Y. Coast Guard spokesman Jim McGranachan said ships using the waterway have been ordered to keep their speeds low enough to avoid creating wakes that would interfere with crews bagging more than 260,000 gallons of the gooey No. 6 heating oil dumped when the British tanker BT Nautilus ran aground last week. The cleanup is expected to last at least eight more weeks.
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NEWS
June 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Coast Guard reopened the Kill Van Kull waterway between Bayonne, N. J., and Staten Island, N. Y. Coast Guard spokesman Jim McGranachan said ships using the waterway have been ordered to keep their speeds low enough to avoid creating wakes that would interfere with crews bagging more than 260,000 gallons of the gooey No. 6 heating oil dumped when the British tanker BT Nautilus ran aground last week. The cleanup is expected to last at least eight more weeks.
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NEWS
March 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cleanup crews mopped up 30,000 gallons of heavy oil that leaked from a damaged tank on a barge at an Exxon terminal, briefly closing the main entrance to New Jersey's chief port area, and a second but much smaller spill occurred nearby. Coast Guard officials in New York said they had reopened the Kill Van Kull waterway, between Staten Island, N.Y., and New Jersey, after Wednesday's spill.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
It may take two months to clean up 260,000 gallons of heavy heating oil that leaked from a grounded British tanker into a commercial waterway between New York and New Jersey, the Coast Guard said. Authorities said they had received reports of grapefruit-size tar balls coming ashore as far as 15 miles away, along Sandy Hook and Breezy Point, the points that flank the mouth of New York Harbor.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A barge carrying 4.2 million gallons of fuel exploded and burned in a waterway that has been plagued by three oil spills this year. The barge blew up after leaving a Citgo petroleum facility at Linden, N. J., at which it had been loaded, split in two and drifted across the Arthur Kill waterway toward Staten Island, N.Y. One crewman was injured. The Coast Guard reported that the barge contained gasoline, but a Citgo spokesman said it carried heating oil.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Corp. suspended all tanker and barge operations at its massive Bayway Refinery and Bayonne Terminal pending an investigation into the second major oil spill in three months in a busy waterway separating New York and New Jersey. Cleanup crews finished mopping up a spill of 3,500 gallons of heavy oil into the Arthur Kill waterway, and Capt. Robert North, Coast Guard captain of the Port of New York, reported there was "no free-floating oil seen anywhere in the harbor or in Arthur Kill."
NEWS
March 16, 1987
A listing Soviet freighter sank 210 miles off the New Jersey shore, leaving behind only an oil slick and some floating sacks of flour, while its 37 crew members got a taste of American hospitality ashore after a dramatic helicopter rescue by the Coast Guard. The group spent the night at a Philadelphia-area motel before traveling to a Soviet Embassy compound in Washington.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
It may take two months to clean up 260,000 gallons of heavy heating oil that leaked from a grounded British tanker into a commercial waterway between New York and New Jersey, the Coast Guard said. Authorities said they had received reports of grapefruit-size tar balls coming ashore as far as 15 miles away, along Sandy Hook and Breezy Point, the points that flank the mouth of New York Harbor.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
An oil tanker ran aground Thursday, spilling 260,000 gallons of heating oil into a busy shipping channel between New Jersey and New York, and the first mate was arrested on a charge of substance abuse. It was the fifth major oil spill in the area since January. Football-size globs of oil washed ashore on both sides of the Kill Van Kull waterway, which was closed to ships after the tanker BT Nautilus hit bottom while docking.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | Associated Press
A Soviet freighter carrying flour to Cuba rolled onto its side in rough seas more than 200 miles off the New Jersey coast Saturday, and Coast Guard helicopters plucked all 37 people off the ship in a dramatic rescue, officials said. The mission, 210 miles out in the Atlantic Ocean, was "wet and dangerous," said Coast Guard Lt. Keith Comer, who directed the rescue in 45-m.p.h. winds as 25-foot waves crashed over the ship.
NEWS
June 8, 1990 | From Associated Press
An oil tanker ran aground Thursday, spilling 260,000 gallons of heating oil into a busy shipping channel between New Jersey and New York, and the first mate was arrested on a charge of substance abuse. It was the fifth major oil spill in the area since January. Football-size globs of oil washed ashore on both sides of the Kill Van Kull waterway, which was closed to ships after the tanker BT Nautilus hit bottom while docking.
NEWS
March 7, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A barge carrying 4.2 million gallons of fuel exploded and burned in a waterway that has been plagued by three oil spills this year. The barge blew up after leaving a Citgo petroleum facility at Linden, N. J., at which it had been loaded, split in two and drifted across the Arthur Kill waterway toward Staten Island, N.Y. One crewman was injured. The Coast Guard reported that the barge contained gasoline, but a Citgo spokesman said it carried heating oil.
NEWS
March 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Exxon Corp. suspended all tanker and barge operations at its massive Bayway Refinery and Bayonne Terminal pending an investigation into the second major oil spill in three months in a busy waterway separating New York and New Jersey. Cleanup crews finished mopping up a spill of 3,500 gallons of heavy oil into the Arthur Kill waterway, and Capt. Robert North, Coast Guard captain of the Port of New York, reported there was "no free-floating oil seen anywhere in the harbor or in Arthur Kill."
NEWS
March 2, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cleanup crews mopped up 30,000 gallons of heavy oil that leaked from a damaged tank on a barge at an Exxon terminal, briefly closing the main entrance to New Jersey's chief port area, and a second but much smaller spill occurred nearby. Coast Guard officials in New York said they had reopened the Kill Van Kull waterway, between Staten Island, N.Y., and New Jersey, after Wednesday's spill.
NEWS
March 16, 1987
A listing Soviet freighter sank 210 miles off the New Jersey shore, leaving behind only an oil slick and some floating sacks of flour, while its 37 crew members got a taste of American hospitality ashore after a dramatic helicopter rescue by the Coast Guard. The group spent the night at a Philadelphia-area motel before traveling to a Soviet Embassy compound in Washington.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | Associated Press
A Soviet freighter carrying flour to Cuba rolled onto its side in rough seas more than 200 miles off the New Jersey coast Saturday, and Coast Guard helicopters plucked all 37 people off the ship in a dramatic rescue, officials said. The mission, 210 miles out in the Atlantic Ocean, was "wet and dangerous," said Coast Guard Lt. Keith Comer, who directed the rescue in 45-m.p.h. winds as 25-foot waves crashed over the ship.
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