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Ship Accidents Northern California

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January 28, 2002 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since it exploded and sank in 1984, the oil tanker Puerto Rican has languished on the ocean floor like a submerged sphinx, guarding its secrets beneath 1,476 feet of frigid Pacific waters. Now the forlorn vessel has resurfaced at the center of a deep-sea mystery: The Puerto Rican may be responsible for an elusive offshore oil trail that has haunted authorities for as long as a decade--so far killing and injuring 1,300 seabirds this winter alone.
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NEWS
January 28, 2002 | JOHN M. GLIONNA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since it exploded and sank in 1984, the oil tanker Puerto Rican has languished on the ocean floor like a submerged sphinx, guarding its secrets beneath 1,476 feet of frigid Pacific waters. Now the forlorn vessel has resurfaced at the center of a deep-sea mystery: The Puerto Rican may be responsible for an elusive offshore oil trail that has haunted authorities for as long as a decade--so far killing and injuring 1,300 seabirds this winter alone.
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NEWS
February 16, 1993 | From Associated Press
A sudden, sharp swell rocked a whale-watching boat as it headed out to sea, tossing four passengers overboard and injuring at least nine people. Those pitched overboard were rescued, including a 3-year-old boy who was saved by a deckhand after the swell lifted the 55-foot Big Mama 1 and dropped it hard. "An exact feeling would be (like) an elevator dropping, but more so," said Harbor Patrol Officer Tom Kellerman, who helped pluck passengers from the water.
NEWS
February 16, 1993 | From Associated Press
A sudden, sharp swell rocked a whale-watching boat as it headed out to sea, tossing four passengers overboard and injuring at least nine people. Those pitched overboard were rescued, including a 3-year-old boy who was saved by a deckhand after the swell lifted the 55-foot Big Mama 1 and dropped it hard. "An exact feeling would be (like) an elevator dropping, but more so," said Harbor Patrol Officer Tom Kellerman, who helped pluck passengers from the water.
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