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Ship Accidents Norway

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April 8, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER and MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writers
An advanced Soviet attack submarine caught fire and sank in the Norwegian Sea on Friday, U.S. and Norwegian government sources reported. A Soviet official in Oslo confirmed that it had sunk. The nuclear-powered Mike-class submarine, which can carry a crew of 95, suffered a catastrophic accident involving "major loss of life," one U.S. government official said. An American monitoring reports on the incident said the vessel surfaced briefly, then sank.
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NEWS
December 2, 1999 | From Associated Press
The high-speed Norwegian ferry Sleipner may have sunk to the bottom of the North Sea with some of its life rafts in place, leading to fears Wednesday of a possible defect in an automatic release system used by a sister ship. The sister ship, the Draupner, was ordered held at port for tests of its life-raft system, said Magne Roedland, a Bergen district official of Norway's Maritime Directorate. The 138-foot catamaran Sleipner ran aground Friday night and sank near Norway's west coast.
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NEWS
April 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Exhausted firefighters Sunday braved intense heat and poisonous smoke from a burning North Sea ferry to begin removing the bodies of up to 147 victims while Norwegian police began the hunt for a suspected arsonist. The fire aboard the Danish-owned Scandinavian Star ferry was so intense that it melted aluminum on the ship's bridge, according to rescue workers. By late Sunday night, the blaze was reported extinguished.
NEWS
November 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The search for nine people still missing after a ferry sank in icy waters off Norway's west coast was called off nearly 24 hours after the disaster, as the death toll stood at 20. Rescuers launched a massive operation Friday when the catamaran Sleipner, with 89 people aboard, sank after hitting a rock in rough seas. Sixty-nine people were rescued. The wreck of the ferry has not been found. Police said the bodies of some of the missing might be inside.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police and firefighters late Saturday launched what was expected to be a grisly all-night search through the still-smoking hull of a North Sea ferry, looking for the bodies of victims who died in a possible arson attack on the ship during a voyage from Norway to Denmark. Firefighters reported finding at least 110 bodies as the stricken Danish-operated Scandinavian Star was towed from a point about 30 miles from the mouth of the Oslo Fiord to Lysekil, a small port on the west coast of Sweden.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A Cyprus-registered freighter sank in heavy seas off the Norwegian coast, and all 20 Polish crewmen were missing and feared dead. Ships and a helicopter searching the waters in near-gale conditions spotted air bubbles from the sunken ship, debris, two empty life rafts, life preservers and the ship's nameplate, said Anders Bang-Andersen of the Norwegian rescue center. The 22,000-ton Leros Strength had been bound for Poland with a load of ore from Russia.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | Reuters
An expedition to monitor seas near an experimental Soviet atomic submarine, which sank off Norway nearly four years ago, has found no radiation leaks, Itar-Tass news agency said on Saturday.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | United Press International
A ferry carrying 495 people erupted in flames off the coast of southern Norway, but the passengers evacuated the vessel in lifeboats and were picked up by another ship, Denmark's rescue service said early today. Officials said the 10,000-ton Scandinavian Star was on its way from Oslo to Frederikshavn, Denmark, with 395 passengers and 100 crew aboard when the fire began.
NEWS
November 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The search for nine people still missing after a ferry sank in icy waters off Norway's west coast was called off nearly 24 hours after the disaster, as the death toll stood at 20. Rescuers launched a massive operation Friday when the catamaran Sleipner, with 89 people aboard, sank after hitting a rock in rough seas. Sixty-nine people were rescued. The wreck of the ferry has not been found. Police said the bodies of some of the missing might be inside.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Swedish police reached the midship cabins of a burned-out ferry and found families who died together at the heart of the fire, the bodies of parents lying over children in a desperate attempt to save them. Inspector Leif Skoglund raised the estimated death toll to 170 in the suspicious weekend blaze that swept the Norwegian North Sea ferry Scandinavian Star. He said one victim in every four may have been a child.
NEWS
November 27, 1999 | From Reuters
Rescue workers searched the North Sea off Norway today after a high-speed ferry sank in rough weather, leaving at least 11 people dead and 12 missing. Chances of finding additional survivors in the chilly waters were slim after the ultra-modern Sleipner catamaran hit rocks and sank Friday evening near Haugesund in western Norway with 88 passengers and crew members. Some of the 65 survivors plucked from the sea or from life rafts were hospitalized in serious condition.
NEWS
February 9, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A Cyprus-registered freighter sank in heavy seas off the Norwegian coast, and all 20 Polish crewmen were missing and feared dead. Ships and a helicopter searching the waters in near-gale conditions spotted air bubbles from the sunken ship, debris, two empty life rafts, life preservers and the ship's nameplate, said Anders Bang-Andersen of the Norwegian rescue center. The 22,000-ton Leros Strength had been bound for Poland with a load of ore from Russia.
NEWS
February 14, 1993 | Reuters
An expedition to monitor seas near an experimental Soviet atomic submarine, which sank off Norway nearly four years ago, has found no radiation leaks, Itar-Tass news agency said on Saturday.
NEWS
April 10, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Swedish police reached the midship cabins of a burned-out ferry and found families who died together at the heart of the fire, the bodies of parents lying over children in a desperate attempt to save them. Inspector Leif Skoglund raised the estimated death toll to 170 in the suspicious weekend blaze that swept the Norwegian North Sea ferry Scandinavian Star. He said one victim in every four may have been a child.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Exhausted firefighters Sunday braved intense heat and poisonous smoke from a burning North Sea ferry to begin removing the bodies of up to 147 victims while Norwegian police began the hunt for a suspected arsonist. The fire aboard the Danish-owned Scandinavian Star ferry was so intense that it melted aluminum on the ship's bridge, according to rescue workers. By late Sunday night, the blaze was reported extinguished.
NEWS
April 8, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police and firefighters late Saturday launched what was expected to be a grisly all-night search through the still-smoking hull of a North Sea ferry, looking for the bodies of victims who died in a possible arson attack on the ship during a voyage from Norway to Denmark. Firefighters reported finding at least 110 bodies as the stricken Danish-operated Scandinavian Star was towed from a point about 30 miles from the mouth of the Oslo Fiord to Lysekil, a small port on the west coast of Sweden.
NEWS
July 17, 1989 | From Reuters
Norway said Sunday that a fire had broken out aboard a Soviet nuclear-powered submarine, but Norwegian radio quoted a Soviet official as saying the reported blaze was part of a military exercise. It was the third incident involving Moscow's underwater fleet in the area in four months. The Oslo Defense Ministry said a Norwegian vessel had spotted the Soviet Alpha-class attack submarine on the surface, smoke billowing from its conning tower and under tow by a Soviet vessel Sunday morning.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | Reuters
Oil from a Brazilian ship that ran aground and broke in two off Norway is polluting the coast and killing birds, Norway's State Pollution Board said Tuesday. The 38,000-ton bulk ship Mercantile Marica ran aground Saturday in an area of great natural beauty where there are many fish farms. Its fuel tanks hold about 2,500 barrels of heavy fuel oil.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | United Press International
A ferry carrying 495 people erupted in flames off the coast of southern Norway, but the passengers evacuated the vessel in lifeboats and were picked up by another ship, Denmark's rescue service said early today. Officials said the 10,000-ton Scandinavian Star was on its way from Oslo to Frederikshavn, Denmark, with 395 passengers and 100 crew aboard when the fire began.
NEWS
October 25, 1989 | Reuters
Oil from a Brazilian ship that ran aground and broke in two off Norway is polluting the coast and killing birds, Norway's State Pollution Board said Tuesday. The 38,000-ton bulk ship Mercantile Marica ran aground Saturday in an area of great natural beauty where there are many fish farms. Its fuel tanks hold about 2,500 barrels of heavy fuel oil.
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