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Ship Accidents Oregon

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NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
Three hundred miles offshore, the wrecked bow of the New Carissa finally sank Thursday after a Navy destroyer fired 70 shells into the oil-laden hulk and a submarine drilled it with a torpedo. First, remote-controlled explosive charges blew holes in the hull of the wreck, which has plagued the Oregon coast for more than a month, fouling miles of beaches. When that failed to sink the ship, the destroyer David R.
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NEWS
October 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
For the last eight months, the New Carissa has been the shipwreck that would not die. Now, with winter weather looming, salvage crews hope to finally haul the freighter's cracked and charred stern off the beach to join the broken bow in a burial at sea. But like everything else in this star-crossed salvage operation, nothing is coming easily.
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NEWS
February 28, 1999 | From Reuters
A 440-foot section of the freighter New Carissa, which has been grounded off the coast of Oregon for more than three weeks, began to ease its way off the beach Saturday, and crews prepared to scuttle it at sea. "In time, she'll just walk off the beach, like we were hoping for and planning for," Coast Guard Capt. Mike Hall told reporters. "There has been some movement, not a lot, not enough," said Alan Hoffmeister, a Federal Bureau of Land Management officer.
NEWS
March 12, 1999 | From Associated Press
Three hundred miles offshore, the wrecked bow of the New Carissa finally sank Thursday after a Navy destroyer fired 70 shells into the oil-laden hulk and a submarine drilled it with a torpedo. First, remote-controlled explosive charges blew holes in the hull of the wreck, which has plagued the Oregon coast for more than a month, fouling miles of beaches. When that failed to sink the ship, the destroyer David R.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
A grounded cargo ship that had been set ablaze to prevent a disastrous oil spill broke apart, but the strategy appeared to be working Friday, with most of the fuel being consumed before it could reach the shoreline. "We did the right thing," said Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Gene Maestas. "By burning the oil, we prevented it from spilling into the ocean." Coast Guard Capt. Mike Hall added: "Every gallon that is burned means one less gallon in the environment and the coastal habitat."
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | Associated Press
Fighting gusty winds, a helicopter ferried a cable to the broken bow of the grounded cargo ship New Carissa on Thursday in preparation for hauling it out to sea. But the winds and pounding surf again kept salvage crews from hooking the 1,100-yard cable between the bow and a tug boat. Just before nightfall, they decided to quit for the day.
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | From Associated Press
For the last eight months, the New Carissa has been the shipwreck that would not die. Now, with winter weather looming, salvage crews hope to finally haul the freighter's cracked and charred stern off the beach to join the broken bow in a burial at sea. But like everything else in this star-crossed salvage operation, nothing is coming easily.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
A Japanese ship that sank off the northwest U.S. coast, spilling oil that washed up on Washington and Oregon beaches, was ripped nearly in two after its collision with a Chinese freighter, a videotape shows. The wreck of the Tenyo Maru, a fish-processing vessel, lies in 500 feet of water 25 miles northwest of Cape Flattery, the northwestern tip of the contiguous United States. Oil from the wreck has killed more than 1,900 birds, and hundreds more oiled birds are being cleaned and treated.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | Associated Press
The broken bow of the cargo ship New Carissa washed back onto the Oregon beach Wednesday after attempts over the last month to firebomb it, pump out its fuel and tow it out to sea failed to make the oil-laden menace go away. The bow nosed onto the beach at dawn after a storm 50 miles out in the Pacific ripped the hulk free from the tug that was towing it to be sunk at sea. Just hours earlier, Coast Guard Capt.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Oregon Department of Agriculture has closed the commercial harvest of Coos Bay oysters, saying spilled fuel from the grounded freighter New Carissa has pushed into a sensitive estuary. Friday's closure affects four large oyster farms, which have about $10 million worth of young oysters seeded into a bay that ranks as the richest oyster-farming area in Oregon.
NEWS
March 4, 1999 | Associated Press
The broken bow of the cargo ship New Carissa washed back onto the Oregon beach Wednesday after attempts over the last month to firebomb it, pump out its fuel and tow it out to sea failed to make the oil-laden menace go away. The bow nosed onto the beach at dawn after a storm 50 miles out in the Pacific ripped the hulk free from the tug that was towing it to be sunk at sea. Just hours earlier, Coast Guard Capt.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | From Reuters
A 440-foot section of the freighter New Carissa, which has been grounded off the coast of Oregon for more than three weeks, began to ease its way off the beach Saturday, and crews prepared to scuttle it at sea. "In time, she'll just walk off the beach, like we were hoping for and planning for," Coast Guard Capt. Mike Hall told reporters. "There has been some movement, not a lot, not enough," said Alan Hoffmeister, a Federal Bureau of Land Management officer.
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | Associated Press
Fighting gusty winds, a helicopter ferried a cable to the broken bow of the grounded cargo ship New Carissa on Thursday in preparation for hauling it out to sea. But the winds and pounding surf again kept salvage crews from hooking the 1,100-yard cable between the bow and a tug boat. Just before nightfall, they decided to quit for the day.
NEWS
February 14, 1999 | From Associated Press
The Oregon Department of Agriculture has closed the commercial harvest of Coos Bay oysters, saying spilled fuel from the grounded freighter New Carissa has pushed into a sensitive estuary. Friday's closure affects four large oyster farms, which have about $10 million worth of young oysters seeded into a bay that ranks as the richest oyster-farming area in Oregon.
NEWS
February 13, 1999 | From Associated Press
A grounded cargo ship that had been set ablaze to prevent a disastrous oil spill broke apart, but the strategy appeared to be working Friday, with most of the fuel being consumed before it could reach the shoreline. "We did the right thing," said Coast Guard Chief Petty Officer Gene Maestas. "By burning the oil, we prevented it from spilling into the ocean." Coast Guard Capt. Mike Hall added: "Every gallon that is burned means one less gallon in the environment and the coastal habitat."
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
A Japanese ship that sank off the northwest U.S. coast, spilling oil that washed up on Washington and Oregon beaches, was ripped nearly in two after its collision with a Chinese freighter, a videotape shows. The wreck of the Tenyo Maru, a fish-processing vessel, lies in 500 feet of water 25 miles northwest of Cape Flattery, the northwestern tip of the contiguous United States. Oil from the wreck has killed more than 1,900 birds, and hundreds more oiled birds are being cleaned and treated.
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