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NEWS
August 22, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When divers finally pried open the hatch of the Kursk on Monday and discovered the submarine full of water, they raised anew perhaps the most painful question concerning the deep-sea disaster: Was it ever possible to rescue the crew? The answer, in all probability, is no. Most of those aboard probably died within minutes of the blasts that ruptured the sub's double hull and flooded the forward sections where they were stationed.
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NEWS
October 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Russian-Norwegian mission to recover bodies from the sunken nuclear submarine Kursk was put on hold because high winds tossed the ships involved in the effort so hard that divers risked being jerked about on their tethers. Northern Fleet commander Adm. Vyacheslav Popov told reporters that he had little hope the divers would be able to recover all the bodies from the stern compartment, where a note found on one of the sailors said 23 had gathered after the disabling blasts.
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NEWS
August 20, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For families of crewmen aboard the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk, the train trip from their hometown of Kursk in central Russia to Murmansk on the nation's northern shore was a rattling, fatiguing journey from hope to despair. The trip took two days, and the train arrived one week after the catastrophic accident that sent the vessel named after their town plunging to the ocean floor.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In May, a group of officers from Russia's Northern Fleet participated in an exercise that they hoped never would be needed: a submarine rescue operation. An old, decommissioned submarine was sunk on an even keel, and Russia's rescue submersibles went to work. Four attempts to dock with the submarine failed, but the official report on the exercise said that it had been a success. The rescue operation for the sunken nuclear submarine Kursk this month was more demanding.
NEWS
October 28, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Russian-Norwegian mission to recover bodies from the sunken nuclear submarine Kursk was put on hold because high winds tossed the ships involved in the effort so hard that divers risked being jerked about on their tethers. Northern Fleet commander Adm. Vyacheslav Popov told reporters that he had little hope the divers would be able to recover all the bodies from the stern compartment, where a note found on one of the sailors said 23 had gathered after the disabling blasts.
NEWS
February 19, 1992 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first publicly acknowledged incident of its kind since the breakup of the Soviet Union, two attack submarines--one American, the other from the Commonwealth of Independent States--collided last week in the icy waters off the Russian naval port of Murmansk, Pentagon officials said Tuesday. The incident prompted Russian charges that the American vessel, apparently on a spying mission, illegally encroached on Russian territorial waters.
NEWS
October 28, 1992 | Associated Press
The Russian navy rescued all the estimated 290 people--mostly refugees from the fighting in Georgia's separatist region of Abkhazia--aboard a ship that had been swamped by a storm in the Black Sea, Russian media reports said Tuesday.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON and ALEXEI V. KUZNETSOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The crew members of the Kursk nuclear submarine felt true pride and honor to be serving in the Russian navy, according to those who knew and loved them, but the catastrophe that took their lives has left surviving navy comrades with a profound sense of shame and horror. While the rescue effort was in progress during the past week, Russia's navy struggled to stand united.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russia turned to the task of retrieving 118 seamen's bodies and twin nuclear reactors from a sunken submarine Monday after a bumbling weeklong search for survivors that left the government chastened by charges of ineptitude. "Our worst fears are confirmed," Vice Adm. Mikhail Motsak, chief of staff of Russia's Northern Fleet, announced to a nation still stunned by its deadliest peacetime naval disaster. "All compartments of the submarine are flooded with water. None of the crew is still alive."
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Grieving relatives of the 118 seamen who died aboard the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk poured out their rage and pain in a heated meeting Tuesday night with President Vladimir V. Putin at a closed military base near the site of the tragedy. Putin, struggling to recover from his worst political crisis since he was sworn in last May, took the desperate step of confronting the fury of the bereaved--a rare move for a Russian political leader.
NEWS
August 23, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Grieving relatives of the 118 seamen who died aboard the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk poured out their rage and pain in a heated meeting Tuesday night with President Vladimir V. Putin at a closed military base near the site of the tragedy. Putin, struggling to recover from his worst political crisis since he was sworn in last May, took the desperate step of confronting the fury of the bereaved--a rare move for a Russian political leader.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When divers finally pried open the hatch of the Kursk on Monday and discovered the submarine full of water, they raised anew perhaps the most painful question concerning the deep-sea disaster: Was it ever possible to rescue the crew? The answer, in all probability, is no. Most of those aboard probably died within minutes of the blasts that ruptured the sub's double hull and flooded the forward sections where they were stationed.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON and ALEXEI V. KUZNETSOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The crew members of the Kursk nuclear submarine felt true pride and honor to be serving in the Russian navy, according to those who knew and loved them, but the catastrophe that took their lives has left surviving navy comrades with a profound sense of shame and horror. While the rescue effort was in progress during the past week, Russia's navy struggled to stand united.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Russia turned to the task of retrieving 118 seamen's bodies and twin nuclear reactors from a sunken submarine Monday after a bumbling weeklong search for survivors that left the government chastened by charges of ineptitude. "Our worst fears are confirmed," Vice Adm. Mikhail Motsak, chief of staff of Russia's Northern Fleet, announced to a nation still stunned by its deadliest peacetime naval disaster. "All compartments of the submarine are flooded with water. None of the crew is still alive."
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nine days after it exploded and crashed to the bottom of the Barents Sea, divers opened an escape hatch to the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk today and found no immediate signs of life on the vessel that went down with 118 crew members aboard. Norwegian divers who opened the hatch's outer door found no bodies inside, but could not immediately determine what may lie on the other side of the inner door or offer information about the chain of events that turned the submarine into an Arctic tomb.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For families of crewmen aboard the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk, the train trip from their hometown of Kursk in central Russia to Murmansk on the nation's northern shore was a rattling, fatiguing journey from hope to despair. The trip took two days, and the train arrived one week after the catastrophic accident that sent the vessel named after their town plunging to the ocean floor.
NEWS
August 21, 2000 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Nine days after it exploded and crashed to the bottom of the Barents Sea, divers opened an escape hatch to the Russian nuclear submarine Kursk today and found no immediate signs of life on the vessel that went down with 118 crew members aboard. Norwegian divers who opened the hatch's outer door found no bodies inside, but could not immediately determine what may lie on the other side of the inner door or offer information about the chain of events that turned the submarine into an Arctic tomb.
NEWS
August 27, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In May, a group of officers from Russia's Northern Fleet participated in an exercise that they hoped never would be needed: a submarine rescue operation. An old, decommissioned submarine was sunk on an even keel, and Russia's rescue submersibles went to work. Four attempts to dock with the submarine failed, but the official report on the exercise said that it had been a success. The rescue operation for the sunken nuclear submarine Kursk this month was more demanding.
NEWS
August 20, 2000 | ROBYN DIXON and RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A senior Russian navy officer told his despairing nation Saturday that all 118 men trapped for a week in a nuclear submarine were probably dead because Arctic seawater had flooded compartments in the rear of the stricken vessel as well as the front. The somber announcement all but confirmed Russia's worst peacetime naval disaster and appeared to shatter any hope that British and Norwegian teams who joined Russian rescue efforts today will succeed.
NEWS
October 28, 1992 | Associated Press
The Russian navy rescued all the estimated 290 people--mostly refugees from the fighting in Georgia's separatist region of Abkhazia--aboard a ship that had been swamped by a storm in the Black Sea, Russian media reports said Tuesday.
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