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NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seafood-rich Galveston Bay opened to shrimpers for the first time in eight days, but officials warned against fishing in waters stained with residue from a 700,000-gallon oil spill. The Coast Guard said it hoped to fully open the Houston Ship Channel, which courses through the bay, to all traffic for the first time since a tanker collided with two barges on July 28. A sunken barge is obstructing the waterway.
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NEWS
September 30, 1990 | United Press International
A 538-foot Norwegian tanker lost power and collided with a tugboat and two barges, dumping more than 100,000 gallons of light crude oil into Houston's ship channel, officials said. The crash occurred late Friday 3 1/2 miles east of Texas City, piercing the hull of one of the barges and spilling the oil into the water, said Petty Officer Mike Sams of the Coast Guard's Marine Safety Office in Galveston.
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NEWS
June 16, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Microbes began eating their way through an oil slick Friday as officials counted on an experimental method to help with the cleanup from the wrecked Norwegian tanker Mega Borg. "If it works in the sea like it works in (the) laboratory, we're going to solve the problem of oil spills in this country," said Texas Land Commissioner Garry Mauro, who has promoted the use of microbes. However, the concept is receiving mixed reviews in the scientific community.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seafood-rich Galveston Bay opened to shrimpers for the first time in eight days, but officials warned against fishing in waters stained with residue from a 700,000-gallon oil spill. The Coast Guard said it hoped to fully open the Houston Ship Channel, which courses through the bay, to all traffic for the first time since a tanker collided with two barges on July 28. A sunken barge is obstructing the waterway.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | Associated Press
An oil tanker collided Saturday with two barges in the Houston Ship Channel, sinking one barge and causing an undetermined amount of fuel to spill, Coast Guard officials said.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | United Press International
A 538-foot Norwegian tanker lost power and collided with a tugboat and two barges, dumping more than 100,000 gallons of light crude oil into Houston's ship channel, officials said. The crash occurred late Friday 3 1/2 miles east of Texas City, piercing the hull of one of the barges and spilling the oil into the water, said Petty Officer Mike Sams of the Coast Guard's Marine Safety Office in Galveston.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | From United Press International
Gov. Bill Clements declared Galveston Bay a disaster area Wednesday as crews worked to clean up the 500,000 gallons of spilled heavy oil that threatened commercial fishing grounds and sensitive marshlands. The No. 2 fuel oil spilled Saturday from one of three barges that collided with a Greek tanker, and by Wednesday the slick covered a 17-mile-wide area and was washing up on shore.
NEWS
June 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Shifting winds pushed an oil slick from the supertanker Mega Borg northeastward Sunday, buying officials a little more time to prepare for when it reaches shore, the Coast Guard said. Officials alerted communities north of Galveston to Louisiana that the tar balls may not be far away. They predicted late Sunday that tar balls from the spill would hit land Tuesday.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A 50,000-gallon, five-mile-long slick of oil from two damaged barges in Galveston Bay was moving away from shore as cleanup crews worked to deflect it from environmentally sensitive waterfowl habitats, the Coast Guard said. Other vessels were backed up in the Houston Ship Channel, closed since the barges collided Saturday with the Liberian tanker Shinoussa.
NEWS
June 13, 1990 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For three tense days, many feared that the crippled Norwegian tanker Mega Borg could leave a wake of oil three times larger than last year's 11-million-gallon Exxon Valdez spill. Now those fears are easing, but the political fallout is just beginning. From the Galveston City Council to environmentalists in Washington, the Mega Borg explosion has added yet more fuel to the controversy over offshore oil operations and development.
NEWS
August 5, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Galveston Bay reopened to fishing Saturday, a week after a tanker-barge collision in the environmentally sensitive waterway that authorities now concede spilled far more oil than previously thought. The state health department declared the entire bay open for taking of fin fish but, concerned about the continuing effects of the spill, maintained a ban on shellfish harvesting across much of the bay.
NEWS
August 4, 1990 | From Associated Press
Coast Guard officials said Friday a barge that collided with a tanker in the Houston Ship Channel may have spilled 700,000 gallons, or nearly all of its cargo, into Galveston Bay. The Coast Guard had said earlier that 500,000 gallons of oil spewed into the bay after the accident. But officials considered adjusting that estimate after salvage crews found nothing in a once-submerged cargo tank they expected to contain about 200,000 gallons of oil.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | From United Press International
Gov. Bill Clements declared Galveston Bay a disaster area Wednesday as crews worked to clean up the 500,000 gallons of spilled heavy oil that threatened commercial fishing grounds and sensitive marshlands. The No. 2 fuel oil spilled Saturday from one of three barges that collided with a Greek tanker, and by Wednesday the slick covered a 17-mile-wide area and was washing up on shore.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oil from a huge spill in Galveston Bay began washing ashore Tuesday, threatening an environmentally sensitive shoreline that is the nesting place for thousands of birds and also one of the prime fisheries along the Texas coast. More than 500,000 gallons of oil have escaped into the bay since a tanker-barge collision Saturday, and one state parks and wildlife official said the danger was such that the marshlands could be devastated.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Coast Guard estimated Monday that 500,000 gallons of oil leaked into Galveston Bay from two barges, 10 times its original estimate of the weekend spill that has killed fish and stalled marine traffic. "We have upgraded the spill to a major spill," said Coast Guard Capt. Thomas Greene. A patchy sheen of oil was heading through the Bolivar Pass from the bay into the Gulf of Mexico, threatening to make the cleanup more difficult, Coast Guard Petty Officer Gene Maestas said Monday night.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
A 50,000-gallon, five-mile-long slick of oil from two damaged barges in Galveston Bay was moving away from shore as cleanup crews worked to deflect it from environmentally sensitive waterfowl habitats, the Coast Guard said. Other vessels were backed up in the Houston Ship Channel, closed since the barges collided Saturday with the Liberian tanker Shinoussa.
NEWS
January 7, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Two ships collided in fog 20 miles off Galveston, Tex., in the Gulf of Mexico, but no one was injured, the Coast Guard reported. Fuel oil from the Margaret Lykes, a New Orleans-based container ship, was leaking slowly from a hole in the 618-foot vessel. The bow of the Shoun Emperor, a 323-foot Panamanian tanker, sustained considerable damage, but none of its cargo had spilled. Coast Guard inspectors said they believed the situation posed no threat to the environment.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | From United Press International
Booms were set out Monday to protect sensitive coastal marshlands that lay in the path of oil from the fire-scarred tanker Mega Borg, and volunteers worked to clear trash from a 40-mile stretch of beach that could be fouled. Tar balls that washed ashore near Sabine Pass at the Texas-Louisiana border were being analyzed but Coast Guard Petty Officer Mark Sedwick said that they were not believed to have come from the tanker spill. The Mega Borg lost at least 3.
NEWS
July 29, 1990 | Associated Press
An oil tanker collided Saturday with two barges in the Houston Ship Channel, sinking one barge and causing an undetermined amount of fuel to spill, Coast Guard officials said.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The fire-scarred remains of the tanker Mega Borg were towed from the spot near Galveston, Tex., where the Norwegian vessel was rocked by explosions last month that killed four men and dumped 3.9 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Officials estimated it would take two months to tow the 885-foot tanker to Karachi, Pakistan, where it will be broken up for scrap metal.
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