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Ship Accidents Thailand

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NEWS
November 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
A U.S.-owned oil-drilling ship with 97 people aboard capsized early today after a typhoon swept through the Gulf of Thailand with 100-m.p.h. winds. Carol Scott, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles-based Unocal, which owns the ship, said in Bangkok that a company helicopter spotted a small overturned boat with a number of people clinging to it. She did not say how many people were seen.
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NEWS
February 14, 1994 | Reuters
About 200 Myanmar workers, many of them women and children, were feared dead Sunday after a boat taking them home capsized off Thailand, police and rescue workers said. Rescue workers said that by late Sunday they had recovered 38 bodies, all but three of them women, off the southern Thai province of Ranong. All the victims appeared to be illegal workers who were returning home, officials said. Provincial Gov. Chamnong Chalerm-rat said few details about the incident were available.
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NEWS
November 6, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Thai fishermen rescued four crew members from an oil and gas drilling ship that capsized in a typhoon Saturday in the Gulf of Thailand. Officials of Unocal Thailand, a subsidiary of Los Angeles-based Unocal, the ship's owner, said in Bangkok that three Thais and one Indonesian from the overturned Seacrest were picked up. The bodies of two others were found inside the ship. The other 91 crew members, including seven Americans, are still missing.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 129 people were feared drowned when a Thai ferry collided with an oil tanker and sank in coastal waters southeast of Bangkok. Eighty-nine ferry passengers were confirmed dead, and at least 40 more were missing, officials said. At least 21 were rescued. Survivors were taken to hospitals in the town of Si Racha, and the bodies of victims were placed in a Buddhist temple. The accident occurred in a busy channel used by tankers and cargo vessels off Si Racha.
NEWS
March 8, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 129 people were feared drowned when a Thai ferry collided with an oil tanker and sank in coastal waters southeast of Bangkok. Eighty-nine ferry passengers were confirmed dead, and at least 40 more were missing, officials said. At least 21 were rescued. Survivors were taken to hospitals in the town of Si Racha, and the bodies of victims were placed in a Buddhist temple. The accident occurred in a busy channel used by tankers and cargo vessels off Si Racha.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Rescuers suspended their search late Saturday for 97 crewmen of a U.S.-owned oil drilling ship that capsized in the worst typhoon to hit Thailand in more than three decades. A helicopter spotted the upside-down hull of the 351-foot Seacrest, but a search covering 600 square miles in the Gulf of Thailand failed to find survivors, lifeboats or debris from the vessel.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | Reuters
About 200 Myanmar workers, many of them women and children, were feared dead Sunday after a boat taking them home capsized off Thailand, police and rescue workers said. Rescue workers said that by late Sunday they had recovered 38 bodies, all but three of them women, off the southern Thai province of Ranong. All the victims appeared to be illegal workers who were returning home, officials said. Provincial Gov. Chamnong Chalerm-rat said few details about the incident were available.
NEWS
November 6, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Thai fishermen rescued four crew members from an oil and gas drilling ship that capsized in a typhoon Saturday in the Gulf of Thailand. Officials of Unocal Thailand, a subsidiary of Los Angeles-based Unocal, the ship's owner, said in Bangkok that three Thais and one Indonesian from the overturned Seacrest were picked up. The bodies of two others were found inside the ship. The other 91 crew members, including seven Americans, are still missing.
NEWS
November 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Rescuers suspended their search late Saturday for 97 crewmen of a U.S.-owned oil drilling ship that capsized in the worst typhoon to hit Thailand in more than three decades. A helicopter spotted the upside-down hull of the 351-foot Seacrest, but a search covering 600 square miles in the Gulf of Thailand failed to find survivors, lifeboats or debris from the vessel.
NEWS
November 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
A U.S.-owned oil-drilling ship with 97 people aboard capsized early today after a typhoon swept through the Gulf of Thailand with 100-m.p.h. winds. Carol Scott, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles-based Unocal, which owns the ship, said in Bangkok that a company helicopter spotted a small overturned boat with a number of people clinging to it. She did not say how many people were seen.
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