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Ship Accidents Washington State

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NEWS
January 1, 1989 | United Press International
In its first official estimate, the Coast Guard said Saturday that at least 168,000 gallons of heavy black crude oil leaked from a ruptured barge last week, soiling 150 miles of Washington beaches and killing more than 2,000 sea birds.
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NEWS
August 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Crews set up equipment to trap fuel leaking from a Japanese ship that sank in about 500 feet of water 25 miles off the northwest tip of Washington state. The oozing oil formed an 80-mile slick fouling pristine Pacific Northwest beaches, killing sea birds and depositing tar balls on the shore, officials said. Boats towing 600-foot-long booms will collect the slick in a smaller area so skimmers can lap it up, a U.S. Coast Guard spokesman said.
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NEWS
January 3, 1989
Nearly two weeks after one of the Pacific Northwest's worst oil spills, cleanup crews using helicopters lifted oil off wilderness beaches and volunteers continued cleaning oil-coated birds. Oil from the spill has been found along almost 300 miles of Pacific beaches, reaching as far north as Canada's Vancouver Island and south as far as Newport, Ore. More than half of an estimated 4,500 sea birds that have been covered with oil have died.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | Reuters
More than 400 birds, including two bald eagles, and three sea otters were mired in oil Monday as Canadian authorities commissioned a submarine to see if the leak from a sunken Japanese ship could be controlled. The birds, mostly murres, were recovered by rescue workers; 139 of them were dead, but the bald eagles and 302 others survived and may be saved.
NEWS
July 30, 1991 | Reuters
More than 400 birds, including two bald eagles, and three sea otters were mired in oil Monday as Canadian authorities commissioned a submarine to see if the leak from a sunken Japanese ship could be controlled. The birds, mostly murres, were recovered by rescue workers; 139 of them were dead, but the bald eagles and 302 others survived and may be saved.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | United Press International
Divers will try to salvage a sunken barge laden with 300,000 gallons of fuel by lifting it off the sea bed with a crane, turning it right side up underwater, and pumping out the fuel so the vessel can be refloated, the Coast Guard said Tuesday. Authorities said salvage operations would begin today when a derrick barge arrives, and the operation will take several days to complete.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 364-foot fish processing ship collided with a freighter and sank in calm waters off the Olympic Peninsula. The Coast Guard said 84 crew members were pulled from the water after the Japanese-registered Tenyo Maru went to the bottom. One was missing. The collision with the 593-foot, Chinese-registered Tuo Hai, on the opening day of Washington's halibut season, was being investigated. The freighter escaped major damage.
NEWS
December 27, 1988
The toll of sea birds coated with oil spilled from a damaged barge near Ocean Shores, Wash., has topped 1,100 and rescue workers expect more as the week goes on. Pam Miller, a biologist for the state Department of Ecology, said 300 gulls, murres, grebes and scoters--their feathers and skin suffocated by the gooey, tar-like oil--have died.
NEWS
August 3, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Crews set up equipment to trap fuel leaking from a Japanese ship that sank in about 500 feet of water 25 miles off the northwest tip of Washington state. The oozing oil formed an 80-mile slick fouling pristine Pacific Northwest beaches, killing sea birds and depositing tar balls on the shore, officials said. Boats towing 600-foot-long booms will collect the slick in a smaller area so skimmers can lap it up, a U.S. Coast Guard spokesman said.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cleanup crews scrambled to a contaminated beach in Olympic National Park as oil from a sunken Japanese ship continued to slosh ashore, threatening thousands of sea birds and mammals. Globs of oil mixed with kelp began washing ashore four days after the Tenyo Maru collided with another ship and sank off Washington's northwest tip.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cleanup crews scrambled to a contaminated beach in Olympic National Park as oil from a sunken Japanese ship continued to slosh ashore, threatening thousands of sea birds and mammals. Globs of oil mixed with kelp began washing ashore four days after the Tenyo Maru collided with another ship and sank off Washington's northwest tip.
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 364-foot fish processing ship collided with a freighter and sank in calm waters off the Olympic Peninsula. The Coast Guard said 84 crew members were pulled from the water after the Japanese-registered Tenyo Maru went to the bottom. One was missing. The collision with the 593-foot, Chinese-registered Tuo Hai, on the opening day of Washington's halibut season, was being investigated. The freighter escaped major damage.
NEWS
January 3, 1989
Nearly two weeks after one of the Pacific Northwest's worst oil spills, cleanup crews using helicopters lifted oil off wilderness beaches and volunteers continued cleaning oil-coated birds. Oil from the spill has been found along almost 300 miles of Pacific beaches, reaching as far north as Canada's Vancouver Island and south as far as Newport, Ore. More than half of an estimated 4,500 sea birds that have been covered with oil have died.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | United Press International
In its first official estimate, the Coast Guard said Saturday that at least 168,000 gallons of heavy black crude oil leaked from a ruptured barge last week, soiling 150 miles of Washington beaches and killing more than 2,000 sea birds.
NEWS
December 27, 1988
The toll of sea birds coated with oil spilled from a damaged barge near Ocean Shores, Wash., has topped 1,100 and rescue workers expect more as the week goes on. Pam Miller, a biologist for the state Department of Ecology, said 300 gulls, murres, grebes and scoters--their feathers and skin suffocated by the gooey, tar-like oil--have died.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | United Press International
Divers will try to salvage a sunken barge laden with 300,000 gallons of fuel by lifting it off the sea bed with a crane, turning it right side up underwater, and pumping out the fuel so the vessel can be refloated, the Coast Guard said Tuesday. Authorities said salvage operations would begin today when a derrick barge arrives, and the operation will take several days to complete.
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