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Ship Accidents

WORLD
January 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea allowed a South Korean police ship to pass through its waters on a rescue mission for 14 missing crewmen after a cargo vessel sank. It was the first time the North had given such permission. The South Korean ship Pioneer sank in international waters about 185 miles off North Korea's eastern coast. Four of the ship's 18 crewmen were rescued, but the others remained missing.
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NATIONAL
January 18, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The Bering Sea had calmed slightly as the Coast Guard resumed its search for three people missing from a crab boat that sank in stormy weather. A man lost overboard from another boat was presumed dead and the search for him was suspended. Three crew members of the 92-foot Big Valley were found by the Coast Guard after the boat sank -- all wearing bulky survival suits -- but only one was alive. Three other crewmen remain missing.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Salvagers have removed the first oil from a freighter broken in two off the coast. The salvage team used a heavy-lift helicopter to remove three oil tanks from the stern of the Selendang Ayu, which grounded and broke apart Dec. 8 off Unalaska Island.
NATIONAL
January 3, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Five fishermen killed when their boat, Northern Edge, capsized in a December storm were honored at a memorial service. About 300 friends, family and politicians, including Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.), filled the 173-year-old Seamen's Bethel in New Bedford, home port to 280 fishing vessels. "Five more men of courage and determination have gone from our midst and will not return to shore," said the Rev. Kenneth Garrett, the church's chaplain.
NATIONAL
December 12, 2004 | From Associated Press
With 24-foot seas and 50-knot winds continuing to pound the Aleutian island where a soybean freighter cracked in half, officials Saturday could take only a few small steps toward cleaning up the massive oil spill left behind.
WORLD
December 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of boats worked to clean up a 14-mile-long oil spill in the South China Sea caused by a collision between two container ships, after divers were sent to patch the hull of the leaking vessel, Chinese state television reported. The oil tank on the German-registered Ilona was punctured in a collision Tuesday with the Panama-registered Hyundai Advance near the mouth of the Pearl River, northwest of Hong Kong. No injuries have been reported.
NATIONAL
November 6, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A 355-foot freighter slammed into an unmanned natural gas platform in the Gulf of Mexico and sparked a fire on the platform, the Coast Guard said. No pollution was reported, though the platform 17 miles off Galveston sustained significant damage. None of the 16 Russians aboard the freighter was injured.
WORLD
October 11, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Canada said it was convinced that a submarine bought from Britain was seaworthy at the start of a disastrous voyage during which a fire injured nine crewmen, one fatally, and left the vessel adrift in the Atlantic. The Chicoutimi was towed to Scotland's Faslane naval base Sunday, five days after the blaze. The sub is one of four that Canada bought from Britain in 1998 but that needed major repairs before they could safely put to sea.
WORLD
September 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Of all the perils of owning a seaside home, Haruo Abe never thought he'd have to deal with a cargo ship in his living room. But that's exactly what he was facing at 2:30 a.m. after the captain of a 550-ton tanker fell asleep. Abe suffered a bruised shoulder when the ship hit his house on Osakikami island, 400 miles southwest of Tokyo. Six crew members were not hurt. "I heard a boom and within three seconds the second floor came falling down," Abe, 76, told Japan's public broadcaster NHK.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New York City's director of ferries pleaded not guilty to 11 counts of manslaughter in the October wreck of a Staten Island ferry. Patrick Ryan left the federal courthouse without speaking to reporters. His attorney, Tom Fitzpatrick, said he and Ryan were taken aback by the harshness of the charges. Eleven people died and dozens were hurt when the ferry's pilot blacked out and the craft slammed into a maintenance pier.
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