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Ship Seizures

NEWS
February 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Backing away from its controversial policy of "zero tolerance," the government will no longer seize commercial fishing boats found to be carrying small quantities of illegal drugs, the Coast Guard and Customs Service said Wednesday. The change took effect immediately after the announcement by Coast Guard Adm. Paul Yost and Customs Service Commissioner William Von Raab.
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NEWS
February 10, 1989 | From United Press International
Federal authorities had hoped for a hefty sum Thursday when they auctioned off a 65-foot fishing trawler seized in an international drug-smuggling case. They got $10. "As far as I know, it is lowest bid for a ship in Rhode Island since the state entered the Union in 1790," U.S. Marshal Donald Wyatt said.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | From Reuters
The mother and brother-in-law of Frenchwoman Jacqueline Valente, kidnaped more than a year ago by Palestinian radicals, said Saturday that they will spend Christmas in Beirut as a gesture of support. Valente was one of eight Europeans on board the yacht Silco when it was seized by Abu Nidal's Fatah Revolutionary Council off the Israeli-occupied Gaza Strip in November, 1987.
NEWS
November 7, 1988 | CHARLES J. STEPHENS, Charles J. Stephens is a media fellow at the Hoover Institution.
"We, the People . . . . " What has been called the first liberty, the precious right to vote, will once again be exercised by the American people. Tuesday, "we, the people" will say either "yes" or "no" to candidates George Bush and Michael S.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | RICH ROBERTS, Times Staff Writer
Cuban officials Wednesday released a small American vessel carrying strange cargo--New Zealand's America's Cup sailboat--after holding it for 23 1/2 hours. A Cuban gunboat had intercepted the offshore oil supply vessel Tampa Seahorse on Tuesday, alleging it had penetrated the island's claimed 12-mile territorial limit en route from San Diego to New York, via the Panama Canal. The United States generally recognizes only 3-mile limits for international waters.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | United Press International
Panama's military, faced with a show of force by American troops, returned a shipment of U.S. military equipment it had seized, the State Department said Friday. The equipment, meant for the Southern Command, the U.S. military headquarters in Panama, had been seized Thursday from a U.S.-registered ship by the Panama Defense Forces, officials said. The equipment included a gun barrel for an M-1 Abrams tank.
NEWS
September 30, 1988
Panama seized a shipment of military equipment bound for the U.S. Southern Command and the ship carrying it, saying that the shipment violated the Panama Canal Treaties. Atty. Gen. Carlos Villalaz said the equipment may have been destined for groups opposed to the regime of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega. A spokesman for the Southern Command, which is headquartered in Panama, denied the allegation, saying that Panama had acted illegally and that the United States has "vigorously protested."
NEWS
September 19, 1988 | Associated Press
U.S. Customs Service agents seized 1,000 pounds of cocaine worth about $12 million wholesale and arrested eight men during a raid on a 38-foot fishing boat named "What's Up," an agency spokesman said. Also seized Saturday were the boat and five vehicles.
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