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BUSINESS
November 29, 1989 | From United Press International
The Navy announced that it has awarded a $416-million contract to Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock Co. of Newport News, Va., to build one Los Angeles-class nuclear-powered attack submarine. Work will be performed in Newport News and is expected to be completed in May, 1995, according to the Naval Sea Systems Command, the contracting authority.
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TRAVEL
January 4, 2014 | By Catharine Hamm
CHATHAM, England - Rope making? Eye rolling. But I was so wrong. I didn't come to Chatham, about 30 miles southeast of London, to find out how to make rope. I came in search of Trixie, Jenny and Chummy - or at least the hangouts of these characters and others in "Call the Midwife," another PBS series that, like "Downton Abbey," has garnered a following for the poetry in its soul. "Midwife" is set in downscale 1950s East London, and parts of the Historic Dockyard, Chatham, once an economic powerhouse from which the British Royal Navy's ships issued, stand in for some of the series' less-than-opulent locations.
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BUSINESS
February 25, 1997 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Is Litton Industries Inc. facing a sea change? Speculation is mounting that the next wave of defense mergers will involve the builders of destroyers, submarines and other U.S. naval vessels, including the Ingalls Shipbuilding division of Woodland Hills-based Litton. Pentagon officials nearly have decreed that the shipyards should merge, because there's more shipbuilding capacity than the nation needs in the post-Cold War era. There's already been one deal. In 1995, General Dynamics Corp.
WORLD
December 3, 2013 | By Henry Chu
PORTSMOUTH, England - Back when Britannia ruled the waves, few places contributed more to the domination and expansion of the British Empire than this seaside city. Its dockyard, reputedly the world's largest industrial site at the dawn of the 19th century, rang with the cries and hammer blows of thousands of workers who built the warships that flexed Britain's muscles in almost every corner of the globe. Shipwrights here traced their connection to the navy to the reign of Henry VIII.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1994 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS
ISSUE: Inspired by the numerous natural harbors along the Adriatic coastline that stretches 400 miles past 1,000 islands, Yugoslavia built an impressive network of shipyards and marine repair facilities before the federation was destroyed by nationalism and war.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1989 | ZAN DUBIN
Clyde Flowers saw it coming. Watching America's shipbuilding industry collapse around him, watching too many friends, after years of service, laid off without notice, Flowers got out before it could happen to him. "I didn't want to sit there, being on the bubble, waiting every day to see if I was the next to go. . . . I signed up for a paralegal class. They say it's a booming career. I hear people are starting off at 30 grand a year." These words are from Flowers' real world and from the stage production, "Steel-Blue Water: The Shipbuilders' Play."
BUSINESS
July 20, 1987 | ROBERT E. DALLOS, Times Staff Writer
Throughout its long history, Todd Shipyards--one of whose antecedents constructed the ironclad warship Monitor of Civil War fame--has built ships for the American and foreign navies and for commercial companies. During World War II alone, it produced more than 6 million tons of shipping, including 444 "Liberty ship" freighters, 29 tankers, 46 destroyers, 56 escort aircraft carriers and 350 landing craft.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1994 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fulfilling a campaign promise during a 1992 visit to the West Coast's only remaining private shipyard, President Clinton on Tuesday announced $1 billion worth of federally guaranteed loans designed to revitalize the shrunken U.S. shipbuilding industry. The loans, aimed at helping domestic shipbuilders compete internationally and wean themselves from military contracts, include $22.7 million for National Steel & Shipbuilding Co. of San Diego.
BUSINESS
May 7, 1999 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Litton Industries Inc., in a bold maneuver to overtake General Dynamics Corp. as the nation's largest naval shipbuilder, launched separate takeover bids Thursday for competitors Newport News Shipbuilding Inc. and Avondale Industries Inc., totaling almost $2 billion. If successful, Litton--a shipbuilding and defense-electronics concern based in Woodland Hills--also would assume Newport News' role as the nation's sole builder of nuclear-powered aircraft carriers.
BUSINESS
May 10, 2001 | PETER PAE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Northrop Grumman Corp. is headed into choppy waters in its last-minute attempt to acquire Newport News Shipbuilding Inc. and spoil a bid by archrival General Dynamics Corp. to become the nation's largest military shipbuilder. In addition to convincing federal regulators that its $2.1-billion offer would pose fewer competitive concerns than the General Dynamics deal, Northrop must persuade Newport News to abandon its $50-million breakup agreement with General Dynamics.
WORLD
November 6, 2013 | By Henry Chu
LONDON - Britain, once the world's mightiest seafaring power, announced Wednesday that it will shut down the last naval shipyard in England, eliminating nearly 1,000 jobs and closing a chapter of history stretching back hundreds of years. Workers in the southern city of Portsmouth have been building warships since the reign of King Henry VIII, including the famous Mary Rose. But citing dwindling demand, the government and defense contractor BAE Systems have agreed to cease construction there.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
YUEQING, China - A shipbuilding boom raised the fortunes of this hardscrabble industrial port. Five-star hotels sprouted along with machinery depots and metal shops. European luxury cars darted past heavy trucks on the bustling streets. But in another sign ofChina'seconomic slowdown, shipyards are now closing and half-finished vessels lie rusting in the humid haze. Prosperity is receding like the tide. Thousands of laborers have lost their jobs. Liu Danyin, a compact man with bulging forearms, found so much work in the region's shipyards over the last decade that he built a new home for his family hundreds of miles away in the countryside.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Since taking the helm of Northrop Grumman Corp. in January, Wesley G. Bush hasn't wasted any time shaking up one of the world's largest military contractors. On his first day on the job, Bush made a stunning announcement that he was moving Northrop's headquarters out of Los Angeles — where the company has been since it was founded in 1939 — to the Washington area. He then pulled Northrop out of the Pentagon's $35-billion aerial refueling tanker competition, shuffled top executives and this week announced he was looking at abandoning the company's $6-billion-a-year shipbuilding business.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
With demand from the Navy for military ships declining, Northrop Grumman Corp. said Tuesday it was closing its Avondale, La., shipyard and may get out of the shipbuilding business altogether. The site near New Orleans employs about 5,000 people. Operations there will be consolidated with the company's Pascagoula, Miss., shipyard about 125 miles away, Northrop said. Century City-based Northrop builds transport and amphibious assault ships at both locations. Consolidating ship construction on the Gulf Coast will reduce costs and increase efficiency, Wesley G. Bush, Northrop's chief executive, said in a statement.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2009 | Ronald D. White
Deep inside the nation's busiest seaport lurks the old Southwest Marine shipyard, a collection of rusting corrugated-metal buildings, broken windows and dark interiors that has appeared in more than a dozen films and television shows, including "Die Hard," "24" and "CSI: Miami." But these days, the 38-acre site at the Port of Los Angeles is the setting for another kind of high-stakes drama, this time involving competing visions of the port's future.
BUSINESS
May 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
The Coast Guard said it would temporarily stop its review and suspend its pursuit of a $96.1-million refund for faulty ships built by Lockheed Martin Corp. and Northrop Grumman Corp. pending a Justice Department investigation. The Justice Department and the Department of Homeland Security's office of the inspector general are investigating the Coast Guard's Deepwater contracts, including the eight, 123-foot patrol boats found to have structural problems.
BUSINESS
July 16, 2010 | By W.J. Hennigan, Los Angeles Times
Since taking the helm of Northrop Grumman Corp. in January, Wesley G. Bush hasn't wasted any time shaking up one of the world's largest military contractors. On his first day on the job, Bush made a stunning announcement that he was moving Northrop's headquarters out of Los Angeles — where the company has been since it was founded in 1939 — to the Washington area. He then pulled Northrop out of the Pentagon's $35-billion aerial refueling tanker competition, shuffled top executives and this week announced he was looking at abandoning the company's $6-billion-a-year shipbuilding business.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Shipbuilders Agree to Scrap Aid: Major shipbuilding nations agreed after five years of negotiations to scrap subsidies to their shipyards, but France rejected the deal, negotiators said. The deal to scrap aid to most U.S., European and Asian shipyards was struck at the Paris headquarters of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.
NEWS
September 9, 2007 | Glenn Adams, Associated Press
Pliers to planes, chisels to chain cutters, hand saws to hammers, they're all here, bins and shelves and racks brimming with them. And a pitchfork, peavey and pipe threader or two. Antique shoppers, wood crafters with keen eyes for special makes or styles, and homemakers looking for good deals all flock to Liberty Tool Co., in a four-story, white clapboard building in the center of a quiet town that long ago buzzed and clanked with mills and machine shops.
BUSINESS
November 22, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Shipbuilders Council of America, concerned about U.S. shipowners sending more vessels overseas for cheap upgrading, has sued to stop Oakland-based Matson Navigation Co. from using a Chinese shipyard. The Shipbuilders Council and Pasha Hawaii Transport Lines filed a lawsuit against the Coast Guard, the Department of Homeland Security and the National Vessel Documentation Center, arguing that a Matson plan to alter three ships was improperly approved.
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